Latest Stories

  1. Employees reach 290 years of service combined

    Employees reach 290 years of service combined

    Eleven employees at Johnsons reached 290 years of combined service in 2023, with extended services ranging from 10 years to 45 years.

    Congratulations and thanks to the employees below for their hard work, commitment, and loyalty to Johnsons during their time with us.

    45 years – Steve Strachan, Unit Manager (Container)

    40 years – Paul Lamb, Assistant Retail Sales Manager

    40 years – Graham Richardson, Group Managing Director

    35 years – Lee Cooper, Unit Manager (Amenity Operations)

    25 years – Paul Bartram, Senior Nursery Worker

    25 years – Steve Morton, Operations Manager 

    25 years – Tracey Richardson, Administrator 

    25 years – Rich Shepherdson, Unit Manager (Thornville)

    10 years – Ellie Richardson, Marketing and Office Manager

    10 years – Eric Buckby, Deputy Unit Manager (Container)

    10 years – Robert Richardson, Production Director

    To celebrate and highlight their long service at Johnsons, each employee received a certificate and vouchers valued between £450 and £100.

    Retail Sales Assistant, Paul Lamb, who joined us after leaving school, said: “Early on, it was a great job, it was active, outside, and I was working with great people, and without sounding cheesy, you turn around and 40 years have gone, and the people you have worked with have had children and Grandchildren!!! It does feel like a big family, and I couldn’t imagine having done anything else” when questioned about his length of service as Johnsons. 

    Steven Morton, Operations Manager, commented: “I have enjoyed working in different areas of the company and learning new skills to help me progress through my career at Johnsons.

    Steve Strachan, Container Unit Manager, said: ” Job security/ continuity and working with lots of great people has made me stay at Johnsons all these years.”

    While Eleanor Richardson added: ” No two days are alike; I could be out taking photos and creating content one morning, and the next I could be creating email campaigns, writing press releases, or working on the re-brand. That’s what I love most about my job, but also, seeing my family so regularly; who else can say they see their direct family members most days at this age…

     

    Posted 26th Jan 3:12pm
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  2. Beneficial bugs

    Beneficial bugs

    Following on from the recent interest in the aphid mummy found on the nursery, here is some more information about predatory bugs and how they can be used in the nursery or a garden setting.

    Biological controls such as parasitic wasps and nematodes are used by nurseries to control insect pests such as aphids and spider mites. In the garden, these beneficial bugs are less under our control, but that does not mean they are not effective. On the nursery, these predators are used in controlled areas such as in the glasshouse where the atmosphere can be controlled and all exits sealed. In these conditions, nematodes can be used to control sciarid flies, thrips and vine weevils. These microscopic worm-like creatures are supplied in a gel-like carrier and then applied to the crop in water as a drench.  The nematode then seeks out a host, enters the body and releases a bacterium, which will kill the pest. Parasitic wasps can be released into a controlled environment. They are applied to the crop as aphid mummies. The adult wasp, when it emerges, looks for an aphid to lay their eggs into and repeats the process. Different species of wasps attack different aphids, so correct identification is important.

    We all do our best to attract pollinator insects into our gardens by providing insect hotels and planting areas that suit how they feed; unfortunately, this also attracts the bugs we don’t want to see, such as aphids and midges. So, before you reach for the chemicals, think about your first line of defence being the beneficial bugs found naturally in your garden. Don’t underestimate a Ladybird; think of these as the bouncers to your flowerbeds. They are voracious beetles that can eat 5000 aphids in a lifetime. This is due to the larvae and the adult being predators, which will also munch their way through midge larvae and small caterpillars.

    Other beneficial bugs that you will come across are lacewing, the larvae, and the adults will predate on aphids. They will even go to great lengths to camouflage themselves with the carcass of dead aphids so they can sneak closer to their prey without being detected. Hoverflies, as well as being good pollinators they will predate on aphids and small prey. Another bug which will be familiar to those who work in gardens are the Flower bug (also known as the Pirate bug due to its markings) because as well as all the good work they do in the garden to feed off aphids, caterpillars and midge larvae, they do bite us too.

    This use of beneficial bugs as a line of attack against pests is a good way to reduce our reliance on chemical controls. It encourages the food chain to develop in the garden as the beneficial bugs will themselves become lunch for birds and small mammals. It is also a less discriminatory method of dealing with insect pests than just blanket spraying the whole crop or garden with chemicals.

    Posted 26th Jan 11:16am
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  3. Johnsons of Whixley Ltd rebrands to Johnsons Nurseries Ltd

    Johnsons of Whixley Ltd rebrands to Johnsons Nurseries Ltd

     

    On the 7th of November 2023, the company ‘Johnsons of Whixley Ltd’ changed its name to ‘Johnsons Nurseries Ltd.’

    Founded in 1921 by war veteran Eric Johnson before being purchased by John Richardson in 1964, the now third-generation family business achieved a record sales turnover of £18.8m in its last financial year and has big plans for growth, with the rebrand defining its intention for moving forward.

    Graham Richardson, group managing director at Johnsons Nurseries, said: “We have used the generic term ‘Nurserymen’ as part of our branding for years, and it has been an accepted historical collective term that describes the profession and not a deliberate specific reflection on gender within the workforce.

    “We are proud of the diversity of our workforce and the contributions that all of our employees make.”

    “However, we are acutely aware of this being perceived as outdated and intend to phase out the term over time as we introduce our new brand. This is also an opportunity for us to solidify our place in the market and ensure that the quality and reputation of Johnsons products are maintained for future generations of our workforce, customers and stakeholders.

    “Our values remain the same as we aim to continue the legacy of professionalism and reputation that Mr Johnson and the Richardson family have built.”

    Other than the name change to our documentation, domains, all other details for the company, and the basis on which we work together, remain the same. Please don’t hesitate to contact us if you have any questions.

    Posted 29th Nov 11:38am
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  4. Celebrating team development – first cohort complete our horticultural training course

    Celebrating team development – first cohort complete our horticultural training course

    At Johnsons, we are committed to helping our team develop, so we are thrilled to announce that the first cohort of Johnsons employees have completed the bespoke horticultural training course we have created in conjunction with Askham Bryan College.

    Fourteen team members were awarded with their certificates at a small celebration with plenty of cake!

    Celebrating our team

    Completing the course were Adam Davis, Matt Campey, Gary Hardwicke, Ashley Robinson, Tomasz Kedra, Gergo Kontos, Chris Edgar, Chris Pearce, Matthew Goodwin, Elliot Green, Katie Burlingham, Dmytro Orlov, Filippo Pellizon and Louise Roberts.

    Commenting on the course, Gary Hardwicke, said: “Attending the tailored Asakham Bryan Collage Course was a great experience. The tutor’s knowledge and passion for plants shone through and they made learning easy and enjoyable.

    I have gained knowledge useful to my role here at Johnsons, I have much more understanding of plants now.Thank you to Johnsons for setting this up, the course also increased my confidence in choosing plants for my own garden at home too.”

    Steve Bassford, Curriculum Area Manager , said: “Overall the tutors who delivered the course were very impressed with the prior knowledge of the employees that attended the course. They were fully engaged throughout and have shown the eye for quality and professionalism that any business should be proud of. Overall the course met and exceeded some expectations and the feedback was very positive from the students.

    On our part, this was a big move from a departmental at the college taking on a course that was tailored to suit and also over the summer period. The course ran smoothly and any issues were dealt with promptly.”

    Creating the course

    Having worked with Askham Bryan, our local agricultural and horticultural college, since the 1970s, we knew they would be the perfect training partner for us.

    As well as having a longstanding history with Johnsons, Askham Bryan is an Ofsted outstanding college that recently launched a new £2.7million training facility at its York site and won a prestigious Educate North Award for its innovation in digital learning and skills.

    Earlier this year, we reached out to the Askham Bryan team about working together in partnership to ensure our team can stay at the forefront of horticultural knowledge, benefiting from its specialist training and facilities.

    And so ‘An Introduction to Horticulture’, our bespoke 12-week course, was created! The course covers all key areas from plant identification and planting locations to the impact of plant choices, helping our team to boost their skills, knowledge and confidence within their horticultural careers.

    To find out more about becoming part of the Johnsons of Whixley family, head to our careers page.

    Posted 27th Oct 3:36pm
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  5. Johnsons receive Plant Healthy accreditation for the third year running

    Johnsons receive Plant Healthy accreditation for the third year running

    We are pleased to have received Plant Healthy accreditation for the third year running.

    The Plant Healthy certification shows that Johnsons is a business that trades and grows plants to a high plant health and biosecurity standard whilst reducing the risk of introducing or spreading destructive plant pests, as well as protecting the horticultural industry, other cultivated plants and natural habitats.

    Plant Health is important to Johnsons for many reasons such as protecting our woodlands from pests and diseases such as ash-dieback and oak processionary moth and safeguarding native flora and fauna from non-native pests and diseases.

    Healthy plants are fundamental for the creation of beautiful gardens and landscapes and are essential for life, making the oxygen we breathe and absorbing carbon dioxide, they are also essential for the food we eat and without them, we wouldn’t be here.

    Johnsons’ Commercial and Business Manager, Jonathan Whittemore, said: “You can help with Plant Health by buying responsibly from reputable nurseries and suppliers and avoiding buying plants that have been sourced from areas with high-risk pests and diseases, keeping your boots clean to avoid spreading diseases, looking after your plants and knowing pests when you see them.

    Want to find out more about the Plant Healthy scheme? click here https://planthealthy.org.uk/ 

     

    Posted 2nd Nov 8:50am
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  6. Creating a garden fit for the King at York Minster Refectory

    Creating a garden fit for the King at York Minster Refectory

    Earlier this year, we teamed up with York-based landscapers, Wild Landscapes, to support the firm’s landscaping project at a new restaurant in York, the York Minster Refectory.

    Our supply to the project included plants and soft landscaping for the new restaurant grounds, which were officially opened by Their Majesties The King and The Queen Consort on 6 April 2023.

    The King and Queen Consort visited York for the Royal Maundy Service at York Minster and revealed a plaque at the restaurant to celebrate their visit and the opening of the new brasserie.

    The York Minster Refectory is based in the Grade II-listed former York Minster school and provides unique views of York Minster. The new brasserie will offer evening restaurant dining, an easy-to-use kiosk for takeaway drinks and snacks as well as private dining.

    The restaurant is a joint venture between GEM Construction and The Star Group Restaurants, headed by the owner of the Starr Inn at Harome, Andrew Pern, who appointed Wild Landscapes to provide the soft landscaping for the project. Wild approached us in turn to supply the plants for the grounds in time for the royal reveal.

    Plants used in the garden design included hundreds of shrubs, herbaceous, hedging and trees. Over 170 Ilex crenata plants were used to create neat edging for shrub and herbaceous borders, while cherry tree Prunus ‘The Bride’ were used as feature trees with outstanding displays of pink flowers.

    Tom Davis, Director of Wild Landscapes said: “This was a really exciting project for us, made even more special by the official opening by Their Majesties The King and The Queen Consort.

    “We chose Johnsons to support on this project as we knew they could deliver top quality plants that would enhance the Refectory’s classic style against the backdrop of the stunning Minster building.”

    Johnsons’ Marketing Manager, Eleanor Richardson, said: “It’s an honour to have been involved in such a prestigious project located on our doorstep. We have worked with Wild Landscapes for a number of years and were pleased to help add the finishing touches to their project in time for the royal visit. I look forward to watching the plants grow and mature and hope they are enjoyed by visitors to York for many years to come.”

    Our plants have been used in a number of royal-worthy grounds over the years, including Holyrood Palace, Blenheim Palace, Kensington Gardens, Hyde Park and Seaham Hall. Get in touch with the team today if you’d like to enquire about how we can support your next project.

    Posted 18th Oct 9:17am
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  7. Mount St John Tour

    Mount St John Tour

    32 Employees recently visited The Mount St John Estate at Felixkirk, Thirsk, over two dates during the summer.

    It was great to see the plants and trees we have supplied in situ with the partnership going back fifteen years.

    On arrival, the estate provided Johnsons staff with tea, coffee and cake and gave a tremendous behind-the-scenes tour of their kitchen garden, contemporary terrace and valley garden.

    Mount St John is a private garden, and the owners commissioned Tom Stuart Smith in 2004 to create a design. He drew inspiration from the field patterns visible from the house and the main garden was completed in 2006, the valley garden commenced is still ongoing. The monastic foundations of the preceptory belonging to the Knights Hospitaller of the order of St John of Jerusalem lie in the field below the Georgian property of 1720. The Victorian kitchen garden and cut flower garden supply local restaurants with produce.

    All in attendance thoroughly enjoyed the tours and were amazed by the size and beauty of the gardens and were grateful for the opportunity to see the plants we supply in a different setting. 

    Posted 14th Aug 11:49am
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  8. Keeping it local for the replanting of York Museum Gardens

    Keeping it local for the replanting of York Museum Gardens

    We have teamed up with ATM Ltd to to supply and beautify the 12.5-acre botanical garden at York Museum Gardens.

    The gardens are located just 11 miles from our head office and were planted by Boroughbridge-based landscaping contractor ATM Ltd.

    The plants were used to refresh and update some of the beds within the Gardens as part of the recent Environment Agency flood defence improvements project. The planting design was developed by Steve Williams, Garden Manager at York Museum Trust; and consultants AECOM.

    York Museum Gardens are located along the north bank of the River Ouse and are a listed botanical garden, containing many varieties of trees, deciduous and evergreen, native and exotic.

    The Gardens were first established in the 1830s by the Yorkshire Philosophical Society and The Yorkshire Museum, situated onsite, was one of the first purpose-built museums in the country. The gardens and museum were given in trust to the City of York Council in 1960 and have been managed by the York Museums Trust since 2002.

    ATM Ltd, one of the UK’s leading landscaping, highway and maintenance contractors is located 18 miles down the road from the Gardens and was tasked with providing the soft landscaping for the project, following engineering works to raise an existing flood bank. Some planting had to be removed, whilst other areas along a woodland path were in need of rejuvenation.

    Johnsons plants used in the project include Astilbe, Astrantia, Bergenia, Brunnera, Carex, Digitalis, Euonymus, Helleborus, Hosta, Hydrangea, Pulmonaria, Viburnum, Cercis ‘Forest Pansy’ and Clerodendrum trichotomum. They were carefully selected to ensure there would be a range of flowering plants through the year to help pollinators thrive.

    Eleanor Richardson, Marketing Manager at Johnsons, said: “It’s an honour to join forces with ATM, one of our long-standing customers, to supply and beautify these local botanic gardens.

    “York Museum Gardens is on our doorstep, so it has been great to visit the site and see the hard work ATM have completed and see the plants thriving. We hope the new planting will be enjoyed by visitors to York for many years to come.”

    Daniel McClaren, Contracts Manager at ATM Ltd, said: “ ATM has been proud to complete the soft landscaping of this project. It was a pleasure to work with York Museum Gardens, AECOM and Johnsons of Whixley to refresh and update some of the beds within the gardens as part of the recent flood defence improvements. The plants were carefully selected with wildlife and seasons in mind. The gardens will be enjoyed all year round. ”

    York Museum Trust Garden Manager, Steve Williams said: “We are committed to improving the biodiversity of our city-centre gardens which welcomes over 1.3 million visitors a year. The plants have helped us to implement a new biodiverse scheme for our Riverside walk in an area which has recently undergone flood scheme alleviation. We selected plants that would flower at different times of the year, including pollinator and butterfly friendly flowers which will help insects to thrive and also support the lifecycles of wider wildlife in the area.”

    Posted 11th Aug 2:46pm
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  9. Welcome back Matt Reid

    Welcome back Matt Reid

    Welcome back to Matt Reid, a familiar face who re-joins our amenity sector, having previously run our wholesale cash & carry. See what he says about his new role below and what it’s like to be back below:

    1)How does it feel to be back?

    Great! Really good, which has only been enhanced with the lovely reception people have given me.

    2)Has much changed at Johnsons while you’ve been away?

    Whilst it’s clear the main drivers of the business come from the same and similar sectors I can only see and sense positive changes. Improvements in the systems show better organisation, plus the business has clearly increased its turnover significantly since my previous employment allowing the sales team to size up. So only positive changes.

    3)What will your new role involve?

    Being a part of the sales team in Amenity, more specially taking and looking after a chunk of some whom are currently Adams customers, covering some of the South and Wales. Which will enable us to apply ourselves to the area better as we look to increase our sales percentage.

    4) What has been a challenge so far?

    Honestly? Not much at all! Probably just trying to keep my cool in the gap between being offered the position and start work with you all.

    5) What are you most looking forward to?

    Getting back to a trade-based working environment within a sector I am passionate about working in. Working alongside some familiar faces whilst I get to know some new people will be another bonus.

    6) Something we don’t know about you?

    In the three years leading up to the pandemic lockdown I went to over 150 live music gigs.

    7) Do you have any hobbies?

    As the last answer might suggest I am a bit obsessed with music and spend as much time as I can in between whatever I’m doing listening to music. I love listening to podcasts. These days I make a point of keeping up with friends and family. Try to remain reasonably active so like to get on my bike or for a walk, and if I’m not on my feet, I like to create art, sometimes by drawing or sometimes digitally.

    8) Name one thing on your bucket list?

    To go on a trip to Mongolia!

    9) Favourite cuisine?

    Mostly something with an Asian and/or Indian type of flavour

    10) Biggest pet peeve?

    Life at the moment is a pretty good place to be; as such, I am really not sure on the spot!

    Amenity sales manager, Vicky Newell said: ” It is great to work with Matt again, he has settled in really well, like he never left! He adds another dimension to our Amenity team and has great horticultural knowledge which really helps.”

    Posted 7th Aug 9:04am
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  10. Multi-million-pound makeover for five-star Durham spa hotel

    Multi-million-pound makeover for five-star Durham spa hotel

    We have recently provided over five thousand plants to a five-star luxury spa hotel in County Durham, as part of the venue’s £8.5million expansion plans.

    We were chosen to supply a range of plants and trees to Seaham Hall Hotel’s grounds, including its bungalow lodges, 44,000sq ft spa area and hotel terrace, as a project to develop a series of new luxury suites for the hotel also gets underway.

    Johnsons worked with Richard Porter of Garden Vision Ltd, supplied the plants for the project, providing a diverse range of plants and trees, ensuring a considered approach in keeping with the property’s Georgian heritage. The supply included Allium hollandicum plants, Allium nigrum, Betula jacquemontii trees, Geranium ‘Johnson’s Blue’, Lavandula ‘Hidcote’, Magnolia ‘Susan’ and Nepeta faassenii. Garden Vision completed the designs for the outside spa area, terrace and lodges as well as providing the soft and hard landscaping for the projects.

    Our three-generation family business has an excellent reputation for supplying the hotel trade. Previous projects include Grantley Hall in Ripon, The Torridon in Scotland and The Springs Resort & Golf Club in Oxfordshire.

    Seaham Hall Hotel, which was built in 1791 in Seaham, 25 miles northeast of Durham, was converted into a luxury hotel in 2012, with its owners committed to ensuring the future of the property as the finest five-star hotel in the region. From a WWI military hospital to a secret whisky bottling facility in the Prohibition era, the Hall has a rich history which is kept alive through the character and charm of the modern-day hotel.

    Today the hotel boasts 21 guest suites, an on-site spa and two restaurant concepts for guests to enjoy and has scooped a string of prestigious awards, the most recent being gold at the VisitEngland Awards 2022, the 2022 AA Inspectors’ Choice Hotel Awards and Good Hotel Guide Editor’s Choice Spa Awards in 2021. The hotel has also been named in The Times and The Sunday Times Best Places to Stay list 2023.

    Johnsons of Whixley marketing manager, Eleanor Richardson, said: “We are thrilled to work with the Seaham Hall Hotel team as their ambitious development plans get underway, in collaboration with our customer Richard from Garden Vision Durham, who delivered the hard and soft landscaping of the project.

    “This was a really exciting project that required incredible attention to detail to ensure that the plants and trees enhanced the property’s heritage and features, while maintaining the luxury coastal feel that guests enjoy, being so close to the beautiful Durham Heritage Coastline.

    Richard Porter Director at Garden Vision Ltd said: “Garden Vision have been proud to complete the design, landscaping & planting for Seaham Hall, a client that we have a great working relationship with. Throughout the design process, I was able to call on the knowledge from Johnson’s, when needed, to ensure the planting design and implementation delivered the quality required for this historic venue.”

    Ross Grieve, Managing Director from Seaham Hall Hotel, said: “The grounds around the hotel are as stunning at the hotel itself, and it’s something which our guests really enjoy – especially being out in the coastal air . Therefore it was important for us to work alongside a business who not only understand this, but have built its reputation landscaping in County Durham and the surrounding counties.”

    Posted 26th Jul 12:00pm
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  11. July Gardening Reminders 2023

    July Gardening Reminders 2023

    Keep control of soft, fast-growing weeds such as thistles; they harbour aphids and other problems.

    Now is the time to make yourself a good big compost bin, just before you really need it!  Ideally, use four stakes as corners 1 metre apart in a square and staple wire netting (1 metre deep) around the square. This affords easy entry when you wish to empty it, or it can be made bigger or smaller at will.  If you would like a really permanent one, use pressure-treated plywood or boards instead of netting.

    Treat shrubs which were cut back in the spring with a high Sulphate of Potash feed to encourage the production of flower buds for next year. Prune shrubs grown on walls and pergolas to remove some of the top growth and further stimulate growth from the base of the plant.

    Evergreen hedges can be clipped this month (and some deciduous ones), but ensure there are no nesting birds in the hedge or bush. Cut laurel, and Eleagnus hedges with secateurs to prevent cut leaves. In hot weather, spray newly planted container-grown hedge plant foliage with water as well as ensuring that the root zone continues to be kept moist.

    Lift tulip bulbs after they have fully died down and store them in paper bags in a dry and airy place over the summer.

     Keep hydrangeas well-watered, particularly those growing in containers, as they quickly show signs of drought, and it can be difficult to get them to fully recover.

     Check the moisture level of hanging baskets every morning, and water thoroughly if dry. Feed plants with a soluble or liquid feed once per week and remove flower heads which are going over.

     Divide established clumps of bearded iris immediately after blooming and plant in the ground or in containers and keep moist. Discard the older exhausted rhizomes, and cut back the foliage of the new plants to approximately 12-15cm.

    Lawns may have turned brown in the very dry weather we had in June, but if it rains significantly in the near future, the lawn will quickly green up again. If it remains dry, leave grass mowings on the lawn to act as a mulch. Remove significant weeds, as these will quickly outgrow the surrounding grass.

    Roses will appreciate a good soak in the dry weather, remove spent flowerheads and ensure that greenflies are not becoming established on the younger shoots. Apply a summer rose feed in mid-month.

    Before hose watering during the summer, ensure that your region has not had watering restrictions imposed, as water resources appear to have become under stress much earlier in the summer than usual.

    In dry weather, an effective way of reducing moisture loss on bare ground between plants is to hoe the ground lightly to maintain a loose tilth, but don’t hoe too deeply. Another good aid in very dry conditions is to apply a 2-3cm mulch of garden compost to the soil surface.

    Prune or tie in shrubs growing on walls or pergolas to secure some of the heavy top growth and further stimulate additional growth from the lower regions of the plant.

     Give the root balls of newly purchased container-grown shrubs and trees a really good soaking before planting and again 5 or 6 days later after planting. Ensure that stakes remain secure after the wind.

    July is a good month to take Heather cuttings, choose strong, young, half-ripe, non-flowering shoots, and dip the bottom 5cm in rooting hormone. Insert around the edge of a 9cm pot.  Keep in a closed-shaded area, and don’t allow it to dry out, but don’t allow drips from covering glass to fall on them!

    Posted 11th Jul 10:59am
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  12. Getting involved with York Cares Big Community Challenge

    Getting involved with York Cares Big Community Challenge

    As a proud Yorkshire business, we were delighted to get involved with the York Cares Big Community Challenge, a remarkable initiative aimed at transforming public areas in York.

    The Big Community Challenge (BCC) is an annual event that brings together businesses, volunteers and local organisations to create lasting improvements within the city. The challenge acts as a catalyst for positive change, uniting individuals with a shared vision of enhancing York’s green spaces for the benefit of all.

    Our aim was to help with the rejuvenation of three sites across the city – Foss Walkway, Hull Road Park and Rowntree Park.

    The three sites were chosen due to their links with the city’s river heritage, with the BCC team focusing on the maintenance and restoration of the river and wetland areas in the city, as well as preserving and improving biodiversity in York.

    Our wonderful team donated a selection of plants with a total value of £1,500 to the projects, resulting in the transformation of neglected beds into vibrant, pollinator-friendly havens. Check it out below!

    Hull Park Road

    Hull Road Park was in need of some TLC, with the site being overrun by invasive weeds such as bindweed, marestail and ground elder. Recognising the park’s potential, we joined forces with the York Cares Big Community Challenge to restore these neglected areas.

    First, the existing beds were dug out to remove the invasive weeds from their root. To prevent the return of these harmful weeds, a weed membrane was installed and backfilled with fresh topsoil.

    The roses that were in the park have been replaced with new planting that will tolerate tougher conditions, such as drought, and are not as maintenance-heavy as roses.

    The planting also offers increased benefits for pollinators, helping to support the biodiversity in the area. As the plants took root and flourished, the rejuvenated beds breathed new life into the parks, adding some much-needed greenery to the area. The formal entrance to Hull Road Park is greatly improved – we are so happy with the result!

    Holly Hennell, manager of York Cares, said: “We are incredibly grateful to Johnson’s for their very generous donation of plants for the Big Community Challenge. The plants have helped to transform three public spaces in York and will be enjoyed by many for years to come. These donations enable us to make a really visible impact.”

    If you’d like to learn more about how our plants can support your projects, please get in touch with our team today.

    Posted 11th Jul 9:54am
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  13. A new role for Ed Greaves

    A new role for Ed Greaves

    Congratulations to Ed Greaves, who was recently promoted to Plant Centre Sales Assistant here’s what he had to say about his new role below:

    1) What will your new role involve?

    Quoting customer orders, responding to customer queries via both emails or over the phone, putting orders through the till and taking payment along with general front-of-house duties.

    2) What was your previous role at Johnsons?

    I was primarily an amenity lifter but spent a bit of time in the cultural and potting departments.

    3) Have you worked anywhere previously that will help you within this role?

    Working at a pub as it helped me to develop how to engage with customers both face to face and on the phone. Also working at Johnsons as it has helped to develop my plant knowledge.

    4) What do you think the challenges will be?

    Initially, it will be just getting used to the processes of completing an order from start to finish, but after that, it would be dealing with any problems that come from customers and how to deal with their problems efficiently and in a timely manner.

    5) What are you most looking forward to?

    I’m looking forward to working with new people in a new environment. Along with this, I’m looking forward to learning more about sales, from sourcing plants from suppliers to prices and margins etc. but most of all I’m most looking forward to enjoying a cup of tea while I work.

    6) Tell us something we don’t know about you:

    In 2018 I was invited to Buckingham Palace twice to steward tea parties on behalf of The Boys’ Brigade. One was the Royal Garden Party and the other was for HRH King Charles’ 70th birthday celebration.

    7) Where would we find you at the weekend?

    Either playing/coaching football or cricket or in the pub.

    8)Dream travel destination?

    New Zealand or Norway.

    9) Favourite food?

    Mexican food – I Love fajitas, enchiladas, and burritos.

    10) An Item you couldn’t live without:

    As much as I hate to say it, it would probably be my phone.

    Posted 10th Jul 4:47pm
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  14. Collaborating with Askham Bryan College to create a bespoke horticultural training course

    Collaborating with Askham Bryan College to create a bespoke horticultural training course

    We have teamed up with York Agricultural and Horticultural College, Askham Bryan to create a new bespoke 12-week horticultural training course.

    We first contacted Askham in the early spring of ’23 regarding a training partnership to ensure our employees stay at the forefront of horticultural knowledge through specialised training.

    We have worked with the college since the 1970s and have provided work placements for students and the college has provided horticultural courses for its staff. Johnsons chairman, John Richardson was also a governor at Askham for twenty years.

    The course, ‘An Introduction to Horticulture’, will offer employees from Johnsons the chance to broaden their knowledge in various aspects of horticulture, from plant identification to planting locations and the impacts of plant choices, with a mixture of practical and theoretical tests.

    The weekly sessions will be held from July – September at the college, which recently celebrated 75 years of providing specialist education. The course will be repeated for future cohorts of Johnsons employees.

    Attendees put their own names forward to attend the inaugural course and were selected by their line managers. Course attendees include Adam Davis, Matt Campey, Gary Hardwicke, Ashley Robinson, Tomasz Kedra, Gergo Kontos, Chris Edgar, Chris Pearce, Matthew Goodwin, Elliot Green, Katie Burlingham, Dmytro Orlov, Filippo Pellizon and Louise Roberts.

    Askham Bryan Curriculum area manager, Steve Bassford, said: “The college is looking forward to having the opportunity to deliver the bespoke course and building on already formed relationships. Having a positive impact on a local business such as Johnsons of Whixley enables a commercial education partnership which will be mutually beneficial to all.”

    Johnsons of Whixley marketing and office manager, Eleanor Richardson, said: “It’s important to invest in our employee’s futures, to broaden and enhance their existing knowledge. This comprehensive learning experience will equip them with essential skills in the field of horticulture and is a good opportunity to get different departments working together in collaboration with our local college again.

    Posted 6th Jul 12:03pm
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  15. Johnsons provide £100k worth of plants for a luxury holiday park development

    Johnsons provide £100k worth of plants for a luxury holiday park development

    Johnsons has provided £100k worth of plants for a luxury holiday park development by Darwin Escapes, at the new self-catering retreat which is due to open on the Blenheim Palace Estate during summer 2023.

    We were chosen as the primary supplier of plants for the project, which will see a collection of one, two and three-bedroom lodges constructed in the grounds of the historic Blenheim Palace Estate. The retreat will be the first venue of its kind on the grounds of a historic British palace.

    With a supply worth £100,000, Johnsons of Whixley has provided a diverse range of plants to enhance the outdoor areas of the Lodge Retreat, which is a blend of contemporary and traditional design in keeping with the Palace and its grounds. From Lavender, Euonymus and Hebe shrubs to vibrant Perennial plants including Rudbeckia, Geraniums, Iris and Salvia, the selection encompasses a rich variety of species, each carefully chosen to create a harmonious and captivating ambience.

    The plants are now in situ and are enhancing Darwin’s newest luxury lodge retreat.

    Johnsons of Whixley has a long-standing relationship with Darwin Escapes and has previously supplied plants for several of its notable projects, including Sandymouth, Woodside Beach, Keswick Reach Lodge Retreat, Canterbury Fields, Stratford Armouries, Norfolk Woods, and The Springs.

    Lindsey Esse, Managing Director of Darwin Escapes, added: “ Johnsons of Whixley has once again supplied us with a beautiful range of plants which perfectly enhance the landscape of our two newest luxury lodge retreats”.

     

    Posted 22nd Jun 4:53pm
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  16. Johnsons to sponsor Perennial garden at BBC Gardeners World Live

    Johnsons to sponsor Perennial garden at BBC Gardeners World Live

    We are pleased to have joined several horticultural businesses to sponsor, support and provide materials for a charity garden at BBC Gardeners World Live. The garden will support the horticultural charity Perennial and is designed to highlight nature’s seasonal influence on mental well-being.

    Other businesses sponsoring the project include Hedges Direct, Marshalls and Rolawn. The garden will be open to the public for viewing from Thursday 15th to Sunday 18th of June at the NEC, Birmingham.

    The garden, named “Escaping the Seasons of the Mind”, has been conceived by Lilidh Matthews, founder of the MicroGarden subscription Finding Roots and John Tallis, owner of landscaping and garden design specialists, Outdoor Living Gardens who will be building the garden in collaboration with Tisserand English Gardens and Utopia Landscapes.

    The garden is an artistic representation of the journey of the mind and the home into the solace of nature and aims to portray the range of emotions experienced throughout the seasons. At its core, the design encapsulates two crucial aspects: the prevalence of suicides during the autumn season and the sad reality that humans spend a staggering 90% of their lives indoors.

    The garden also features 11 Corten Steel Pillars to represent the overbearing nature of the seasons with a bench representing the 12th month of the year and the passing of time.

    The project aims to raise awareness/fundraise for the horticultural mental health charity, Perennial which supports people in the horticultural industry, including the businesses sponsoring, with health and well-being, housing and financial support and debt advice.

    For Johnsons, which recently became a Platinum Partner for the charity, mental health is a top priority. Marketing and office manager, Eleanor Richardson, said: “We are honoured to announce our contribution to this significant project, providing an array of plants that will enhance the garden’s visual impact and underscore its emotional narrative.

    “We firmly believe in the power of nature to heal, inspire, and provide solace, and this partnership with Lilidh Matthews, John Tallis, Outdoor Living Gardens, and Perennial aligns perfectly with our commitment to supporting causes that make a positive difference.”

    Victoria McIver, Brand and Communications Manager at Hedges Direct added: “Hedges Direct are proud to be sponsoring Gardeners’ World Live 2023, supplying our hedge plants, trees and shrubs for the wide array of show gardens. We are especially thrilled to be able to showcase our plants in the ‘Escaping the seasons of the mind’ garden for Perennial, in raising awareness of how our well-being can be impacted by spending time outdoors.

    We love hearing our customers tell us what joy they find in their gardens, so it’s wonderful to be able to encourage more people to take time out to notice and nurture our green spaces during each season, and in doing so nurture our mental health.”

    Posted 22nd May 11:36am
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  17. Johnsons staff achieve over 16 million steps during April for Perennial charity

    Johnsons staff achieve over 16 million steps during April for Perennial charity

    Forty employees have achieved over 16 million steps during April as part of a company challenge for Move More April to raise money for Perennial, the UK’s leading horticultural charity.

    Move More is an annual celebration that encourages individuals to move more and sit less in their daily lives.  Johnsons of Whixley employees involved in the challenge raised over £550 for Perennial and achieved 16.3 million steps in 30 days.

    The winning team, ‘Hydrangea’, achieved over 2.2 million steps and included Katie Short, Simon Harrison, Tracey Richardson and Martyn Osbourne. Martyn achieved a whopping 927,841 steps alone.

    Other employees involved in the challenge included Jack Witham, Vicky Newell, Hannah Reilly, Freya Lamacq-Wigham, Rob Forrester, Hannah Holland, Katie Burlingham, Dmytro Orlov, Adrian Price, Eleanor Richardson, Katie Rothwell, Sarah Perry, Adam Davis, Matt Campey, Lynda Pearson, Kirsten Morgan, Marcin Czajkowski, Paul Richardson, Tony Green, Sarah Greenwood, Tony Coles, Jo Goodyear, Tom Watkins, Rachael Richardson, Terry Cooper, Karl Connors, Cassie Hasslegrove, Louise Roberts, Isaac Onions, Jonathan Richardson, Anna Sibley, Mark Weatherill, Claire Horner, Catherine Cowling, Chris Edgar and Phil Georgiou.

    All staff participating in the challenge received a Johnsons water bottle and certificate, with the winning team members receiving a gift voucher each.

    Challenge organiser and marketing manager at Johnsons of Whixley, Eleanor Richardson, said: “I was overwhelmed with the number of Johnsons employees who signed up for this year’s step challenge to raise money for Perennial, it shows how keen we all are to support the UK’s only charity dedicated to helping those in our industry. Benefits from the challenge include team building and improved mental and physical well-being. Walking 10,000 steps a day can reduce the risk of illnesses such as stroke, type 2 diabetes and cancer in particular, not to mention the obvious weight loss benefits. Well done to all involved.”

    Phil Swainston, corporate partnership manager for Perennial, added: “Many thanks to all the staff at our new Perennial partner, Johnsons of Whixley, for undertaking their fantastic steps challenge throughout April. It is a great example of how the industry can support the charity, not only through partnership, but also through individual fundraising initiatives to spread our message that Perennial is here for all those working in horticulture that may need our help.“

    Posted 22nd May 10:53am
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  18. Plant donation to Leeds Mind

    Plant donation to Leeds Mind

    A garden border designed by Jo Manfredi-Hamer Garden Design for the recent Harrogate Flower Show will find a new home as it is to be donated to the charity Leeds Mind.

    The plants will be moved to the Leeds Mind Garden at Clarence House in Horsforth.

    Plants used in the urban boost border will be donated by Johnsons and are worth over £1,500 with plant varieties including Taxus, Prunus lusitanica, Malus Evereste, Viburnum tinus, Hebe ‘Green Globe’, Heathers, Choisya ‘Sundance’, Heuchera, Tiarella and more.

    Jo’s 3.6m x 1.2m design features Johnsons plants, a red willow-weaved fox and a wired hedgehog by renowned sculptor Emma Stothard. The garden design highlights that we can all do our bit to reduce pollution and feed insects in urban areas along with the mental health benefits a garden can have.

    Leeds Mind promotes positive mental health and well-being and provides help and support to anyone who needs it in and around Leeds. Services they offer include counselling, employment support, suicide bereavement, mental health training and more.

    Gemma Community Fundraiser at Leeds Mind said: “We are so grateful for the donation of plants to give some TLC to our office garden. It makes such a difference to be able to offer clients and partners a welcoming space, as the connection between green spaces and well-being is well-evidenced. A huge thank you from us to Jo and Johnsons of Whixley.”

    Jo Manfredi-Hamer said: “It’s been a tough few years for the garden at Leeds Mind because the pandemic meant the staff and volunteers couldn’t get in to give it the attention it needed. So, it’s great to be donating the gorgeous plants from Johnsons to them. I know they are delighted with the donation. To be able to highlight ways in which plants can help environmental issues at the same time is the icing on the cake.”

    Eleanor Richardson, Marketing Manager at Johnsons of Whixley said: “We are pleased to have sponsored Jo’s latest design at the Harrogate Flower Show and that we are able to donate the plants after the show to Leeds Mind.

    Johnsons have recently invested time in mental health training for all staff and now has two mental health first aiders. As a local company, we are acutely aware of the work done by the charity Mind, and the network of local Minds, so it’s great to offer our support to Leeds Mind via a plant donation which will have a positive impact on the office grounds for staff and visitors to enjoy.”

    Posted 28th Apr 11:24am
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  19. Johnsons hosts senior politicians to discuss industry challenges

    Johnsons hosts senior politicians to discuss industry challenges

    Our Group Managing Director, Graham Richardson, Commercial and Business Manager, Jonathan Whittemore and our Production Director, Robert Richardson, recently met with MP Nigel Adams and Trudy Harrison MP Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Defra) to discuss a number of challenges in the horticultural industry including the retreat from peat.  We ask that the government work with growing media manufacturers to focus on developing alternatives to the peat removed from growing media and to help the industry avoid the exposure to price inflation.

    The retreat from peat is a political ‘hot potato’ with recent announcements suggesting an accelerated timescale. It is estimated that between 1.7 and 2.0 million cubic metres of peat will have to be replaced with sustainable alternatives in the industry.

    The industry has been hit by several challenges in recent years, including Brexit, Plant Health constraints, the pandemic and now the peat ban, which have all come at significant cost to those in the industry.

    Group Managing Director Graham Richardson said, “It was an honour to host the minister and other key individuals to discuss the key Horticultural Challenges facing our sector, the importance of our sector was acknowledged, and the challenges that the ‘retreat from peat’ brings in terms of a practical growing media alternative (in sufficient volume) and the associated timings are better understood”.

    All parties who attended the meeting agreed on further dates for future discussions and consultation regarding the ‘retreat from peat’ and other challenges within the sector.

    Posted 24th Mar 9:33am
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  20. Johnsons launch 15m step challenge in support of Perennial

    Johnsons launch 15m step challenge in support of Perennial

    Johnsons has launched a 15 million step challenge as part of Move More Month in April to raise vital funds for the horticultural mental health charity, Perennial.

    Perennial supports people in the horticultural industry, including those who work at Johnsons, with health and wellbeing advice, housing and financial support and debt advice.

    We recently became a Platinum Partner for the charity, and mental health is a top priority. We have successfully delivered mental health training to our whole workforce, with 34 managers and deputies receiving additional mental health first aid training from MHFA England qualified team members.

    Marketing and office manager, Eleanor Richardson, and amenity operations unit manager, Dave Barrett, was the first to complete the mental health first aid course via MHFA England and since qualifying in October, they have been training other members of staff on how to support each other’s mental wellbeing alongside health and safety advisors.

    Speaking of the challenge, Eleanor Richardson, marketing and office manager and qualified mental health first aider at Johnsons of Whixley, said: “At Johnsons, we believe that taking care of our employees’ mental health is just as important as their physical health, so that’s why this challenge is such an important one for us.

    “Not only will we be supporting Perennial, which has helped a number of our team members in the past, but we will be getting together as a team and building bonds across departments, getting some exercise and supporting one another towards a shared goal.

    “We have seen first-hand the impact mental health issues can have, and we want to do everything we can to support our employees.”

    Li Crane, the fundraising administrator at Perennial, added: “I would like to thank the whole team at Johnson’s of Whixley for undertaking this fantastic Steps Challenge throughout the month of April. It is a great example of how our industry can support Perennial through fundraising initiatives and by finding ways of spreading our message that Perennial is here for all those working in horticulture that need our help.”

    In addition to the investment in training, Johnsons of Whixley has created a number of resources to support its staff. This includes monthly updates to notice boards and a brochure for staff on how to spot and manage negative mental health triggers. The brochure also contains information on how to support positive mental health both at work and at home, advice on how to open up about issues, and details on various support networks and helplines.

    We plan to continue our efforts to spread awareness of mental health issues and provide support throughout 2023, with support services readily available, creating a positive and supportive work environment for all employees.

    You can sponsor staff via the JustGiving page below

    https://www.justgiving.com/page/johnsons-of-whixley

    Posted 21st Apr 9:31am
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  21. March Gardening Reminders 2023

    March Gardening Reminders 2023

    With spring on the horizon and frequent sunny days increasing, theirs plenty of tasks to complete in the garden during March, from pruning to giving the lawn its first cut and removing spring bulb flowerheads when they have finished flowering.

     

    Prune strong growing Buddleias down to about 45cm. for a good show in the summer. Prune down to 60-80cm for denser but weaker overall growth.

     

    Apply a moss killer to the lawn and lightly rake over to remove debris as the moss dies off. Cut the lawn on a dry day when conditions allow, the almost certainly second half of March, with the mower blades set high. Trim the lawn edges with a half-moon or a spade.

     

    Cut back to 30-40cm., willows and dogwoods which are being grown as a bush for their bright spring and summer growth. Use some of the prunings as hardwood cuttings and root them in pots or borders.

     

    Don’t plant out tender plants yet, the wind can be extremely cold, and temperatures can get low enough to cause a significant depth of snow with 5-8cm of frozen soil. On average, the Yorkshire region can expect 90 to 100 hours of sunshine in the month, and significant winds in coastal areas.

     

    In view of the apparent increase in the number of dry spells in recent years, it could well be to advantage to provide a 5cm. a mulch of compost or leaf mould to plants such as hydrangeas and newly planted trees and shrubs which may suffer from a lack of moisture.

     

    By the middle of the month, the water pumps for deep ponds could go back into the water, and begin to feed any fish you may have in the pond.

     

    Re-seed bare patches in the lawn. It is a good time to propagate shrubs by layering low-growing branches of choice shrubs to produce a significant young plant. A very satisfying exercise!

     

    Arrange to plant summer flowering bulbs when planting conditions are good.

     

    After late heavy snowfalls, knock snow off the conifers before the branches get bent over and broken. Most plants are better under snow in a hard frost as they are well insulated.

     

    When daffodils have faded, remove the flowerheads, but not the flower stalk, in order to prevent the plant from wasting energy on bringing seed heads to maturity.

     

    Propagate heathers by layering or heel cuttings, and remove perennial weeds before planting at 30-40cm. Spacing, incorporating peat and bone meal for acid-loving varieties.

     

    Hard prune shrubby Eucalyptus to 15cm. This helps to retain the good blue foliage colour and keep the shrub compact.

     

    In bad weather, finalise plans for garden improvements and order plants and sundries to enable you to start work as soon as possible.

     

    Hard prune climbers down to 30 cm. that have got out of hand include rambling roses, ivies, honeysuckle and jasmine.

     

    Finish pruning perennials which have not yet been cut back, don’t remove new green shoots. There is still time to lift and divide large herbaceous clumps. Replant or give away outer sections of the clump and destroy the older centre of the plant.

     

    Kill weeds on paths and drives with an approved weedkiller, and keep them clean with a total weedkiller. Remove moss from paths and driveways with an approved moss killer.

     

    Lift overcrowded snowdrop clumps out of the ground with a fork when the leaf tips are turning yellow, and replants immediately in a new site at the same depth.

    Posted 2nd Mar 11:09am
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  22. Johnsons host behind-the-scenes tour for students

    Johnsons host behind-the-scenes tour for students

    We recently opened our doors to The Yorkshire School of Garden Design (YSGD) for an exclusive behind-the-scenes tour.

    Fifteen students and two lecturers from the accredited Society of Garden Designers (SGD) school visited our nursery on 22 February to gain an operational insight into a horticultural nursery, including its production and despatch functions.

    The students were given a full guided tour of two of the nursery’s sites, incorporating the potting shed, despatch yard and nursery beds. They were also given demonstrations and advice on how to shop with the trade nursery once they have completed their course.

    The visit culminated with a presentation on the history of Johnsons, which celebrated its centenary in 2021. Johnsons also provided gift bags, lunch, tea, and coffee for its guests.

    The Yorkshire School of Garden, based at Harewood House and 16 miles from our nursery, opened its doors to students in September 2022. Earlier this month it was granted ‘Educator Status’ by The Society of Garden Designers (SGD) in recognition of its high standards of garden design education and ‘best practice’ teaching. It is one of only two educational providers in the north of England to hold SGD accreditation.

    The School offers a Diploma in Garden Design, a Diploma in Planting Design from January 2024 and numerous short courses. Students at the School have access to over 100 acres of gardens filled with trees and plants from around the world.

    The School’s Founder and Principal Tutor Alistair Baldwin has lectured internationally, delivering courses in China, North America and throughout the UK. He has over 25 years of experience and an international reputation as a garden designer and educator. Alistair has worked with Johnsons throughout his career and has used their plants in numerous designs.

    Liz Rawlinson, principal tutor and garden designer at The Yorkshire School of Garden Design said: “What an amazing visitor experience the Johnsons team curated for the YSGD students! We cannot thank them enough.

    “Everything was supremely efficient, organised and professional, from our initial communication to the programming and the smooth running of the day itself. It really did feel like a tailor-made visit for the YSGD and we could tell just how much effort went into the logistics of our large group ‘interrupting’ a normal working day at an incredibly busy time of year.

    “The hospitality was very much appreciated, and we thank them for the personalised lunch boxes and gift bags. We especially loved the opportunity to pot up Pachysandra for the Peat Free Compost trial with Tom, it was a really lovely touch.

    “The students commented on the overwhelming sense of the scale of the operations at Johnsons and what a valuable and insightful visit it had been. They left feeling reassured they could approach Johnsons for potential future projects and more informed on how to go about doing so. “

    Eleanor Richardson, marketing and office manager at Johnsons, said: “It was a pleasure to host students and lecturers from The Yorkshire School of Garden Design. We gave them behind-the-scenes access to the nursery, and a better understanding of production, operations and despatch as well as knowledge of the company’s history.

    “It gave us the opportunity to sell our products and service to fifteen potential new customers. We wish them every success with their course and welcome their trade applications on completion.”

    Posted 2nd Mar 10:20am
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  23. Johnsons invest in bespoke management training programme

    Johnsons invest in bespoke management training programme

    We have invested in upskilling 12 team members through a bespoke management and leadership training programme in partnership with BHP Consulting.

    The programme, designed specifically to meet the commercial nursery’s needs, is part of Johnsons’ long-term commitment to providing opportunities for growth and progression within the horticulture industry.

    Luke Richardson, Sales Director at Johnsons of Whixley said: “As the business continues to grow and transitions to the third generation of family ownership, we believe that investing in and developing our management team is more important than ever, and we are committed to providing long-term opportunities for people in the horticulture industry.

    “As a company, we have worked closely with BHP board advisor and training provider, Mark Roberts, for four years. Mark is well-versed in our entire operation and perfectly positioned to deliver the training. “

    Johnsons also run a rising stars programme which aims to develop the skill set of existing staff members to enable them to one day take on more of a senior role within the business.

    Vicky Newell, Amenity Sales Manager at Johnsons of Whixley and leadership training delegate, said: “I have enjoyed the leadership programme, which has helped me tackle some issues within my department. I have also found a better way to manage my time to get the important tasks done when I am most effective. I have also enjoyed listening to others on the course and discussing common work issues within our breakout sessions. It has also enabled me to approach other managers within the business to solve problems which will ultimately improve the service we offer our customers.”

    Mark Roberts, training provider and board advisor at BHP Consulting, added: “We developed the programme to specifically help support the managers in their current roles. It included practical hints and tips that can be used in their daily business activities, we also had the opportunity to discuss some of the current challenges and develop some new ideas and potential solutions.

    Throughout the sessions, there has been a very high level of engagement from all participants, and it shows the business has a management team in place to support its future growth.”

    Congratulations to the following employees who completed the leadership training programme – Darren Smith, David Barrett, Eleanor Richardson, Hannah Smith, Katalin Dacre, Lee Cooper, Matt Campey, Simon Harrison, Steven Morton, Tom Watkins, Tomasz Kedra and Vicky Newell.

    Posted 27th Feb 12:02pm
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  24. Johnsons plants decorate major charity event

    Johnsons plants decorate major charity event

    Back in November, we loaned almost £20,000 worth of our stock to the Yorkshire Children’s Charity to support their landmark ‘A Night Under the Stars’ celebration event.

    Held at the prestigious Grantley Hall, our trees, topiary and shrubs were used to dress the marquee at the event, which hosted guests from Europe, including H.S.H Prince Albert II of Monaco.

    Our supply contained over 35 varieties including Betula jacquemontii, Acer plat. ‘Cleveland’, Photinia fraseri ‘Red Robin’ and Taxus baccata ‘Fastigiata’.

    The Yorkshire Children’s Charity, which was established in 2022, has a focus on helping disadvantaged children in Yorkshire living in poverty or living with a disability. With the charity raising over £500,000 in the last year to support families and children living at a disadvantage, we are proud to have supported the star-studded event to celebrate their successful year, whilst toasting to the future plans of the regional charity.

    Supported by Grantley Hall and Berry’s, the event was held on 4 November 2022 in a beautiful orangery and dressed by florist to the stars, Fulford Flowers. The plants we loaned were incorporated into the event design by the esteemed Party Architect and legendary Royal party planner, Johnny Roxburgh.

    The exclusive, invite-only event raised over £800,000 for the charity and featured a champagne reception, an exceptional four-course banquet, a fireworks display and entertainment including the Yorkshire Symphony Orchestra. The event successfully brought together some incredible highlights to achieve the charity’s goal of raising over £1,000,000 in its first year.

    Some other events the charity undertook to raise this money include the Yorkshires Residential Real Estate Awards 2022, which raised over £151,693 for children across Yorkshire, the Yorkshire Ladies Lunch, as well as other beneficiary events and fundraising events by supporting businesses.

    Johnsons has worked with Grantley Hall previously, when it was first opening up as a new five-star luxury hotel and spa in the Yorkshire Dales and was looking for our expert touch in the grounds. We were asked to provide thousands of plants to restore the grounds to their original splendour, in keeping with the hall’s rich history.

    This project saw great success, with a number of large topiaries, including Fagus (Beech) domes and Buxus (Box) balls, as well as thousands of herbaceous, shrubs and grasses for decorational borders. To complete the project there were several large hedging elements, including Hedera Hibernica (Ivy) screens that will be used to create partitions in the Hall’s gardens.

    Posted 15th Feb 4:09pm
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  25. February Gardening Reminders 2023

    February Gardening Reminders 2023

    February is a great month for gardening as spring is in sight, with bulbs starting to emerge, lighter evenings and birds starting to chirp.  Be sure to prune, tidy and look after plants that struggle in the cold this month.

    Divide and replant snowdrops as the flowers go over.

    Pot up or transplant last year’s hardwood cuttings.

    Brush snow off conifers and heathers if there is heavy snowfall in order to prevent branches and stems from being broken.

    Plant some lilies in deep pots and keep them in the greenhouse, ready for transfer to the flower border when the flowers develop.

    Prune shrub roses in late February to encourage growth from the base. Remove some old shoots, but don’t reduce height too much as they tend to flower on older wood.

    Don’t apply heavy fertiliser applications to naturalized bulbs as this will only encourage the surrounding grass.

    Make sure the hellebores have been tidied up with the removal of all the old leaves to make way for the new flowers and leaves, which will arise very shortly.

    Plant roses as soil conditions permit, and prune stems of new HT and Floribunda roses down to an outward-facing bud, 75 to 150cm above the graft. Firm the soil around the roots.

    When the weather is too cold to do much else, turn the compost heap upside down and inside out to ensure that all the outside materials will be rotted down as soon as possible.

    Cut back Clematis Jackmanii and C. Vitticella groups to about 30cm. Pyracanthas should be pruned to within two buds of the main framework except for required extensions, if not already completed last autumn.

    Continue to plant new fruit trees and bushes when conditions allow and apply a 12cm thick mulch of well-rotted compost to the root zone, allowing a 10cm space between compost and the trunk or stem to prevent future stem rot.

    Prune-established fruit trees other than damsons and cherries. Prune newly planted fruit trees to shape and reduce leading shoots by half.

    Check that house drains and other run-off areas from the garden are not choked by rotting leaves. Also applies to the lawn!

    Check stored fruits for signs of rot, and throw out partially damaged fruit for the birds.

    Check fruit trees for mummified fruits still retained in the branches, and remove and destroy them to help prevent further disease in the coming summer.

    Prune out old fruiting canes on autumn fruiting raspberries down to soil level. Remove a quarter of the old branches to the base to encourage strong new growth.

    Before you start clearing leaves or forking over bare areas, check for bulbs which have started growing and are just below the surface.

    Take hardwood cuttings of forsythia, deutzia, honeysuckle, jasmine, Virginia creeper, holly, privet, cotoneaster, poplar, willow, gooseberries etc.

    Invest in a soil thermometer. When the soil temperature exceeds 5 deg. C, start sowings of hardy crops such as carrots, lettuce, and radish direct into the ground.

    Clean out bird boxes again and sterilize them with a kettle full of boiling water before new nesting materials are introduced.

    Apply a mulch of garden compost, mushroom compost or similar, to all trees and shrubs in potentially dry sites. No need to incorporate it into the soil; worms will be pleased to do it for you!

    Don’t apply mushroom compost, which has a high lime content, to acid-loving plants such as rhododendrons and azaleas.

     

    Posted 6th Feb 10:28am
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  26. 40 years on - Tony Green

    40 years on - Tony Green

    Congratulations and a huge thank you to Tony for his hard work and commitment to the company for the past 40 years, we asked him about his time at Johnsons, here’s what he had to say below:

    1) What have you enjoyed most about your 40 years at JOW?

    I played in the Johnsons cricket team and scored my one and only goal in the 5-a-side team. It was scorcher from just inside the halfway line. Don’t let anyone tell you any different.

    2) Did you work anywhere else prior to JOW?

    I had six months on a youth opportunity scheme working on a farm. Previous to that I worked at Johnsons and other local farms during my school holidays.

    3)What roles have you had within the business?

    When I started, you did a bit of everything. I had some time doing most of the spraying on the container unit. Along with the irrigation, we had a lot of large aluminium pipes, which we moved about the beds. Then I took responsibility for lifting orders, which was probably the job I enjoyed most, the challenge of getting everything lifted for the end of the day. After that 2 – 3 years on the potting side before becoming manager of the incoming goods and getting my first experience of the bare root and root balls. That’s where I have stayed for the last 22 years.

    4) Tell us something you remember from your first ever day:

    My first day was spent lifting orders with Mandy Woolly. We had an electric milk float which we took around the beds collecting plants for orders

    5)  What has your greatest achievement been at JOW?

    Still being here after 40 years.

    6) Tell us a funny story from your time at JOW:

    There have been many. Before the days of Dave and Terry and health and safety. I thought I was the Stirling Moss of tractor driving, when coming back from the compost heap late afternoon foot to the floor on the fastest Massey Ferguson 135 we had. The trailer is attached with a wood box and a terrified passenger holding on for dear life. I took the corner just past tunnel 15, heading down to the potting shed (cash and carry office).When I got there, the c.u. manager did not look impressed. I retraced my steps and couldn’t find the trailer or passenger, only the trailer pin. On my way back to the yard, I saw my passenger, who told me what happened. As I took the corner at tunnel 15, the trailer pin jumped out, and the trailer box and passenger came to a halt by what is now H1. Thankfully, no one was hurt, and nothing was damaged. Although the passenger was probably scarred for life and never rode on the back of a trailer again when I was driving. He has gone on to be one of the directors. Should I do an incident report Terry?

    7) If you hadn’t chosen a career at Johnsons, what would you think you would have done?

    Formula one tractor driver on some farm or another.

    8) What has made you stay at Johnsons for all of these years?

    I got married and bought a house in the year I started, so back then, it was the money and security. I have had different jobs within the business to keep me on my toes. And, of course, it goes without saying all the many interesting friends, colleagues and characters I have worked with over the years.

    Posted 11th Jan 4:06pm
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  27. January Gardening Reminders 2023

    January Gardening Reminders 2023

    January is the perfect month for planning out your garden activities and planning ahead for 2023; it is also an excellent month to do your winter pruning and planting while roots remain dormant.

    Prepare the ground for planting roses; if the ground is wet or sticky, delay planting until conditions improve. ‘Heel in’ newly purchased bare root roses until conditions are suitable.

    Check stored dahlia tubers, and place them in a bucket of tepid water overnight if they have shrivelled. Cut out rotten areas of the tuber and treat wounds with a dusting of flowers of sulphur.

    Thin out dead and diseased branches from established trees and shrubs. Winter prune wisterias by cutting back young shoots to within 7.5cm of old wood.

    Continue to plant new fruit trees and bushes when conditions allow and apply a 12cm thick mulch of well-rotted compost to the root zone, allowing a 10cm space between compost and the trunk or stems to prevent future stem rot.

    Do not let ice form on the surface of concrete pools, as it may expand when thick and could damage the pool sides.

    Take root cuttings of a wide range of plant species by lifting the root system and selecting a few roots the thickness of a little finger and 8-10cm long. Cut the top horizontally and the base diagonally to prevent confusion. Plant in the compost a couple of cms below the surface and cover with approx 2 cm of sharp sand—place in a cold frame or frost-free glasshouse for the rest of the winter. New shoots should begin to appear in early spring.

    Mid-winter is the best time to take chrysanthemum cuttings as they root easily.

    Prune-established fruit trees other than damsons and cherries. Prune newly planted fruit trees to shape and reduce leading shoot leaves by half.

    Dead-head winter flowering pansies to ensure they continue to flower freely.

    If you need to move a shrub which has outgrown its space, dig around the plant with a vertical spade to a depth of 45-60cm and then use the spade to cut under the roots from all sides until the rootball is free. Ease a piece of thick polythene under the root system and drag it out of the hole to its new location. Once firmly in place, fill back the space around the rootball, firm the soil by treading it in, and water thoroughly to eliminate air pockets.

    Spray fruit trees and bushes with a tar-oil winter wash to kill overwintered aphid eggs. This also kills moss and lichen. Do not spray in frosty or windy weather, and protect evergreens or lawns in the area with ground sheets as they are subject to being burned by the spray.

    Prune out old fruiting canes on autumn fruiting raspberries down to soil level. Remove a quarter of the old branches to the base to encourage strong new growth.

    Before clearing leaves or forking over bare areas, check for bulbs that have started growing and are just below the surface.

    Check the plant labels on plants around the garden; many will have faded or broken.

    Now the garden is bare, take an objective look around from all angles and consider if an ornament, seating or a structure of some sort would add interest.

    If hard weather is forecast, wrap up tender plants such as Agapanthus in bracken or straw for added protection.

    Mark areas where bulbs come into flower with twigs so that future cultivations can be made safely. They will be easier to find if you wish to move them at a later date.

     

     

     

    Posted 11th Jan 3:45pm
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  28. The Employee Awards 2022 Winners

    The Employee Awards 2022 Winners

    In December 2022, we asked staff to vote for their colleagues for our end-of-year Employee Awards’. The winners and runners-up were announced at the Christmas party at the end of last month with ten award categories, including ‘Always In a Meeting’, ‘The Team Player’ and ‘The Bright Beginner award’.

    Each employee received a certificate and prize. below are this year’s winners.

    EMPLOYEE OF THE YEAR AWARD

    Winner: Tony Green

    Runner-up: Simon Harrison

    A huge thank you and congratulations to Tony, our Incoming Goods Manager, who was our 2022 employee of the year in his 40th year at Johnsons.

    THE BRIGHT BEGINNER AWARD

    Winner: Frances Whyte

    Runner-up: Chris Edgar, Darren Smith

    Frances joined us in February 2022 as our HR Administrator and has been an asset to the company with a bright future ahead of her.

    ———————————————————————————————–

    THE MOST LIKELY TO GO TO THE EXTRA MILE AWARD

    Winner: Martyn Osbourne

    Runner-up: Fillipo Pellizon, Vicky Newell, Kirsten Morgan, Jason Dacre

    Martyn always goes above and beyond, whether that be by starting early before the working day, staying later or completing tasks he has been asked to do with a smile.

    ———————————————————————————————–

    THE TEAM PLAYER AWARD

    Winner: Simon Harrison

    Runner-up: Katie Burlingham, Steven Morton

    Simon is very selfless and is always on hand to help other departments, putting himself forward for tasks and overtime – he is a true team player.

    ———————————————————————————————–

    THE KEY CONTRIBUTOR AWARD

    Winner: Adrian Price, Tony Green, Fillippo Pellizon

    Runners up: Steven Morton

    Three winners with equal votes, all contributing significantly to the company in 2022 and beyond.

    ———————————————————————————————–

    THE CONSIDER IT DONE AWARD

    Winner:  Marcin Czajkowski, Peter King

    Runner-up: Katalin Dacre, Terry Cooper

    You can always rely on Marcin and Peter to get the task done.

    ———————————————————————————————–

    THE ALWAYS IN MEETING AWARD

    Winner: Steven Green

    Runner-up: Jonathan Whittemore

    We asked Steve to comment on this, but he was in a meeting…

    ———————————————————————————————–

    THE SUPER SNACKER AWARD

    Winner: Matt Campey

    Runner-up: Dmytro Orlov, Simon Harrison

    Johnsons very own grazer…

    ———————————————————————————————–

    THE MULTITASKER AWARD

    Winner: Katalin Dacre, Tom Watkins

    Runner-up: Sarah Greenwood, Tony Green

    Kata juggles multiple roles and still finds time to help where needed.

    Tom does a great job of managing our Cattal site alongside Mark and will bounce from task to task.

    ———————————————————————————————–

    THE ALWAYS WITH A SMILE AWARD

    Winner: Dave Nicholls

    Runner-up: Isaac Onions, Sarah Greenwood

    Come rain or shine; Dave is rarely without a smile on the nursery.

    Posted 5th Jan 10:22am
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  29. A warm welcome to Catherine Cowling

    A warm welcome to Catherine Cowling

    A warm welcome to Catherine Cowling who joins our cash & carry team – see what she had to say about her new role below:

    1) What will your new role involve?

    Caring for the plants and their environment within the cash & carry team.

    2) Where have you worked previously to Johnsons?

    I have owned my own business for the last 22 years. Time for a change and new adventures.

    3) What makes the horticultural industry attractive to you?

    As a keen amateur gardener, I am as happy talking to the plants as I am to my colleagues, customers and inquisitive robins alike.

    4) Tell us something that you have learnt during your time at JOW that you didn’t know before?

    The plants around me have more up-to-date passports than I do.

    5) What would we find you doing at the weekend?

    Rebuilding, restoring and renovating an old cottage in the Yorkshire Dales using heritage materials and methods. A labour of love and a thief of time.

    I am also writing a novel.

    6) Favourite cuisine?

    Keralan (South Indian).

    7) Have any hidden talents?

    Many hidden talents I harbour well, but am reluctant to share, show or tell. Concealed for a reason, I’m sorry to say. You’ll have to wait for another day.

    8) Name an item you couldn’t live without:

    A camera.

    Posted 5th Dec 1:16pm
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  30. A new role for Elliot Green

    A new role for Elliot Green

    Congratulations to Elliot Green, who has been promoted to deputy amenity operations manager from Cattal senior nursery worker. Find out what he had to say about his new role below:

    1)What is your new role, and what does it involve?

    Deputy Amenity Operations manager.

    I cover for the Amenity Operations manager when he is not present. Day to day, I help train new lifters and am involved with progressing the department.

    2)How will this differ from the last role?

    At first, I thought it would be very similar to my last role deputising to Ned at Cattal, where we would organise the daily lifting of orders. Here at Newlands, the role is involved with other departments, and the role itself covers a much larger scale and a bigger team that changes regularly.

    3)What have you enjoyed from your role so far?

    The opportunity to work with two different Managers in a short time has been interesting. As the scale and complexity are much larger, I have enjoyed learning and gaining knowledge of new plants and processes.

    4)What do you think the challenges will be?

    Gaining enough knowledge to add and develop a well-run department.

    5)Do you have hobbies outside of work?

    I enjoy Gaming, music and sport.

    6)What is your favourite food?

    I like Enchiladas, Steak or Salmon.

    7)Tell us something your colleagues don’t know about you?

    Jack Witham my cousin knocked me out, I was taken to Hospital by Ambulance and had to stay overnight, I suffered concussion for a fortnight.

    8) If you could live in another country, where would it be and why?

    Australia for the outdoor lifestyle.

    Posted 5th Dec 1:10pm
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  31. Meet our management trainee - Adrian Smith

    Meet our management trainee -  Adrian Smith

    Welcome to the team, Adrian Smith, who recently joined the team as a management trainee. Adrian, like Charlotte, will work at different sites within the business and learn about how each site runs.

    1) Have you had any previous experience in horticulture?

    I have spent the last 20 years in various nurseries/garden centres starting as a nursery assistant, then as assistant manager and finally as a nursery manager involved in the production of plant stock to sell within the nursery.

    2) Did you study anywhere?

    I haven’t studied horticulture other than gaining an HTA Diploma in Garden Retail which allowed me to utilise what I learnt within the retail environment of horticulture I have come from. But carrying out the job I have for the time I have done it within different places has enabled me to learn so much.

    3) Where did you previously work?

    I started my career in horticulture after being made redundant from the Post Office. My first placement in horticulture was a year in a garden centre as a plant area assistant. Then came an opportunity to work within a retail nursery where I spent ten years and learnt a lot about growing, not just selling plants, and widened my plant knowledge considerably. During that time, I also set up my own garden design business along with a friend and would carry this out on my days off. After ten years, the company I worked for had to be sold, so I moved on to be an assistant manager in a garden centre for a couple of years, then had the opportunity to become a growing manager back at the nursery I started at after being taken over. I was then given the opportunity to become a nursery manager at a garden centre near Rutland Water, where I was able to grow many varieties of plants to sell within the shop.

    4) What will your training at Johnsons involve?

    While carrying out the management course, I will have to spend so many weeks within each department of Johnsons to enable me to understand a little of how the whole business works. This will go on for a period of 2 years, and some departments will go back for a second time. During this time, I have to complete sections of a file of work. I have to show what I have learnt about each particular job every few weeks.

    I will have meetings with my mentor Rob along with the particular manager of each department to discuss how I am getting on and any concerns I may have.

    5) What have you enjoyed so far?

    Having just spent five weeks at Roecliffe, I have been allowed to learn a variety of things that are done within the company, which has made it enjoyable. I also spent a day at Newlands with my partner Charlotte, learning Tractor and Dumper Truck driving. We had a great day with Martin teaching us despite him constantly getting my name wrong. Ha ha. Plus, it fell on the same day that we had ‘Burger Day’, so it was a good day all around.

    6. What are you looking forward to in your new role?

    I am hoping to gradually gain more confidence in my own abilities as I struggle to have self-belief in what I can do. Also, as both my partner and I are very interested in the propagation and growing plants, we hope that in time we will be able to use what experience we have in this field to get the business to look into more of this if the opportunity arose.

    7. What do you think the challenges will be?

    Having come from a smaller retail growing environment, I think for me the challenges will be working for such a large wholesale company with many different departments and separate locations that work in a completely different way than I am used to. Along with this, getting to know so many different people each time I move onto a new department and hope that they will be able to work with me. It’s always a big challenge moving to a new job, but also moving to a new area and working in a field I am not used to can sometimes become a little overwhelming.

    8. Tell us a random fact about yourself?

    In between my roles within horticulture, I took on a role within the Ambulance Service as an Emergency Care Assistant for a short time. This was quite a challenging job but one which I am glad I had a go at despite the stresses. In the end, Horticulture came calling again, and I went back to looking after plants rather than people.

    9. Do you have any hobbies?

    I haven’t done any since moving to Yorkshire, but I have done various half and full marathons and find running a great activity for clearing the mind. I also like to do quite a bit of hill walking and, in the past, have done the Yorkshire Three Peaks.

    Posted 5th Dec 1:02pm
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  32. Meet our management trainee - Charlotte Smith

    Meet our management trainee - Charlotte Smith

    A warm welcome to Charlotte Smith, who recently joined the team as a management trainee. Charlotte will be working at different sites within the business and will learn about how each site runs.

    1) Tell us about your past roles in horticulture:

    I worked as a nursery assistant and then progressed to a deputy manager at a retail nursery. I also spent time propagating at a specialist conifer nursery, learning from conifer expert Derek Spicer.

    2) What will your role as a management trainee include?

    Learning all aspects of the business and how each site runs.

    3) What have you enjoyed most about your time at Johnsons so far?

    The day spent tractor & dumper training and my time spent at Roecliffe, especially when I was put in charge of the lifting.

    4) What are you most looking forward to in your role?

    The potential to expand on my propagation trail of Mahonias and to perhaps propagate more plant varieties on site.

    5) What do you think the challenges will be?

    Understanding departments well enough to be able to assist in managing them.

    6) Favourite plant variety?

    We have quite a collection of trees at home, all currently in pots; however, my favourite would have to be Cercis ‘Ruby Falls’.

    7) What do you like to get up to outside of work?

    Going for long walks in the Yorkshire dales and along the coast. I enjoy visiting small independent nurseries to expand our plant collection. Also, spending time working on our new allotment.

    8) Tell us something your colleagues won’t know about you:

    I have just had a new tattoo, meaning I now have seven.

    Posted 5th Dec 11:53am
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  33. Ranked as Yorks 40th top business

    Ranked as Yorks 40th top business

    We are delighted to have been crowned as the region’s 40th top business.

    We have now appeared in the York Top 100 Businesses report for five consecutive editions.

    The list is compiled jointly by York Business School at the city’s St John University, Make it York and The Press newspaper.

    Placings are calculated using an algorithm devised by York Business School that includes critical performance factors such as turnover, profit, growth and staff numbers.

    Group Managing Director Graham Richardson said: ” We are extremely proud to have been crowned York’s 40th leading business, alongside so many elite businesses in our region.”

    Posted 5th Dec 11:41am
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  34. Getting into the Christmas spirit - wreath workshop

    Getting into the Christmas spirit - wreath workshop

    Twenty-four staff members recently came together for a wreath workshop hosted by Johnsons employee Rachael Richardson on the 30th of November.

    The wreath workshop was organised by Rachael and Ellie Richardson and paid for by the company.

    Rachael owns Folium Floral Design outside of work and provided the wreath workshop, where staff enjoyed making their own Christmas wreaths to take home.

    The evening was a huge success and got everyone into the Christmas spirit; the staff enjoyed mulled wine, hot chocolates and mince pies while making their wreaths.

     

    Posted 5th Dec 11:35am
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  35. December gardening reminders 2022

    December gardening reminders 2022

    Want to keep busy in the garden during December? There’s plenty to do, from clearing leaves, cutting back overgrown hedges, pruning Acers and Betulas, planting new fruit trees and bushes and more… check out our full hints and tips by our chairman and horticulturist, John Richardson below.

    After the heavy November rain, fallen leaves are becoming a congealed mass in many gardens Try and clear them to the compost heap before they begin to rot and affect many of the plants, such as herbaceous, alpines, low-growing shrubs and plants in containers.

    Ensure that outside taps and taps in unheated buildings are well insulated, and turn off the stop taps to prevent the possibility of them freezing.

    Clear leaves off the lawn and replace any damaged areas of turf with new turfs from a less obvious location on the lawn.

    Take the opportunity to cut back overgrown hedges, either mechanically on deciduous plants by the use of a saw or secateurs on large-leafed evergreens such as laurel or rhododendrons. Wait until growth starts again in the spring before pruning conifer hedges.

    Clean moss and lichen from paths and walls. There are several brands of commercial cleaners available, but bleach is equally as good. A power washer will make light work of the job, which is impressive when completed!

    If you intend to get on with early winter digging, cover a suitable area with polythene so that the ground is not waterlogged when you wish to dig.

    Lower temperatures and snow are forecast; make sure your bird feeding stations are clean and regularly refilled. The same applies to an accessible water supply. Remember, cooked food for birds instead of bird seed may attract vermin.

    If heavy snow falls, try and make some time to brush or shake it off trees and shrubs where it is likely to cause breakage to branches due to the weight of the snow.

    If rabbits are a problem in your area, protect newly planted shrubs with rabbit guards or wire netting to prevent them from damaging the stems.

    Prune Acers and Betula species before mid-December to prevent wounds from bleeding.  Do not prune Hamemellis, Chimonanthus, Forsythia etc., until after flowering.

    Plant new fruit trees and bushes in clean fertile soil and stake as appropriate for the plant and subsequent growth intention.

    Take hardwood cuttings of a range of woody trees and shrubs as recommended.

    Thoroughly clean and oil all garden tools, and sharpen those with cutting edges. Change the oil in the lawnmower to be ready for next season.

    Check stored fruits for signs of rotting and throw out damaged fruit for the birds.

    Any plants which are now too big for their location or ‘in the wrong place’ can be safely moved. The soil in December is usually warm enough to stimulate the production of new roots. Stake tall new plants to prevent wind rock until well-rooted, and reduce their size if appropriate.

    Move permanent container plants such as Camellias into the shelter in the lee of walls.

     

    Posted 5th Dec 9:45am
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  36. Welcome to the team Hannah Reilly

    Welcome to the team Hannah Reilly

    A warm welcome to Hannah Reilly, who joins the sales team as a Sales Estimator. Hannah will be responsible for the completion of plant tenders for our existing and prospective customers.

    1) Tell us one thing that has made your JOW experience enjoyable so far?

    Everyone has been so lovely and welcoming to me and helped me whenever I have needed it!

    2) Where have you previously worked?

    Before this, I was a Team Support Manager at M&S Food, so it’s been a big change for me, but I can’t say I’m missing the 3 am starts I used to do at M&S!!

    3) How did you celebrate getting your new job?

    I had an M&S Dine In for two and a bottle of prosecco to celebrate!

    4) What have the biggest challenges been so far?

    Learning all the plant names and different tree sizes! I feel like I’m getting there slowly but surely, though!

    5) What would we find you doing on an evening after work?

    You’d find me in the gym after work, it’s my fave way to switch off after a busy day and have time for myself. And then catching up on some rubbish reality tv!

    6) What is an item you couldn’t live without?

    Hmm id probably say my phone; I’m a bit addicted to it, which is bad!

    7) If you could go on holiday anywhere in the world, where would it be and why?

    Whitsunday Islands in Australia- I went in 2020 while I was away travelling, and it’s my favourite place in the world!

    8) Name one thing on your bucket list:

    To see the Northern Lights in Iceland at Christmas.

    Amenity Sales Manager Vicky Newell said: “Hannah is a great addition to the team and is fitting in well into her new role. She is a great addition to the sales team, and we wish her every success.”

    Posted 25th Nov 10:37am
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  37. Grantley Hall competition terms and conditions

    Grantley Hall competition terms and conditions

    What do I have to do?

    • Visit us at stand C22 at FutureScape between the 15th and 16th of November 2022.
    • Take a photo using our Yorkshire props and selfie frame and follow and tag us on one of our social media platforms (Instagram, Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn) and use the hashtag #FutureScape2022
    • Complete our competition form with contact details to be entered into a draw for a chance to win – https://johnsonsnurseries.co.uk/competition-form/

    What will I win?

    You will be entered into a draw to win the following:

    • A one-night fine dining in Shaun Rankin at Grantley Hall and an overnight stay for two worth £970 (Valid for 12 months)
    • The voucher entitles the guests to the 10-course tasting menu with the signature wine pairing. In addition, this voucher entitles the guests to an overnight stay for two with breakfast.

    Please read the full terms and conditions listed below before applying:

    Terms and conditions

    • The promotor is Johnsons of Whixley Ltd
    • Entrants must visit the Johnsons of Whixley Ltd stand at the FutureScape show between the 15th & 16th of November 2022 and take a photo using Johnsons props and selfie frame, tagging a Johnsons social media platform and complete their online/and or paper competition forms to be entered into the draw – https://johnsonsnurseries.co.uk/competition-form/
    • Entrants must be 18 and over
    • The prize is only open to futureScape 2022 attendees only
    • All entries must be received by 23:59 on the 16th of November, 2022
    • Entries received after the end of the prize draw period will not be valid
    • You can not enter the competition more than once
    • There is only one prize available
    • The prize is not transferable and cannot be changed or redeemed for cash.
    • The winner will be announced w/c the 21st November
    • The winner will be contacted directly via the contact information provided
    • A Social media announcement will be made on Johnsons platforms
    • The winner agrees to promotional activities such as a social media announcement
    • Entries that did not win will not be contacted
    • The prize does not include travel to and from the property
    • The promotion is not connected to and nor is it sponsored, supported or organized by Instagram, LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter or Grantley Hall
    • Employees at Johnsons of Whixley, their family members or anyone else connected in any way with the competition or setting up the competition shall not be permitted to enter the competition
    • The Promoter reserves the right to withdraw this offer or amend these Terms and Conditions at any time without notice.
    • In the event of any dispute regarding the terms and conditions, the conduct, results and any other matters relating to this prize draw, the decision of the Promoter shall be final, and no correspondence or discussion shall be entered into
    • By entering, applicants agree to the above terms and conditions

    Posted 9th Nov 3:59pm
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  38. Our Rising Stars, Tom, Ned and Kieron

    Our Rising Stars, Tom, Ned and Kieron

    Congratulations to Tom Chilton, Ned Antonov and Kieron Pattison for completing our rising stars programme earlier this year. The trio were awarded certificates, a star trophy and cake earlier this month.

    Tom, Ned and Kieron embarked on our rising stars programme back in 2020 when they were selected to participate.

    Rising stars was first introduced by the company seven years ago with the aim of developing the skillset of existing staff members to enable them to one day take on a more senior role within the business. We have made a significant financial investment in the programme to ensure its success.

    The programme focuses on horticultural sessions, operational nursery activities, technical modules and training experiences which leads to a formal qualification in team leading.

    Group managing director and Kieron Pattison.

    Rising stars was open to staff from all parts of the business and an interview process was undertaken to choose candidates.

    The programme was delivered in conjunction with external training providers and included a mixture of on-site training and external training providers.

    Group managing director and Tom Chilton.

    Ex-employee Ian Nelson mentored the growing stars and guided the delegates through the various challenges to ensure they are equipped with the skills and knowledge they will need as managers of the future.

    Group managing director and Ned Antonov.

    Group managing director Graham Richardson said: “We are delighted that Kieron, Tom and Nat have recently passed our Rising Stars programme with flying colours”. “Our aim is to identify tomorrow’s senior managers and equip them with the skills to succeed.”

    “Thanks for persevering, guys; congratulations on your success and best wishes for the future”.

    Rising star Tom Chilton said: “The rising stars was not an easy task to complete, however now it is over, I can see the reward. It helped me to grow my skills in Leadership and Management. To any people thinking of applying in the future, I would recommend it; however, it is good to consider that it isn’t an easy course to complete. COVID did make it even harder due to having to cancel tuition etc., which makes the reward even more worthwhile.”

    Posted 22nd Oct 9:16am
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  39. Working with BBC DIY SOS Children in Need 2022

    Working with BBC DIY SOS Children in Need 2022

    We were delighted to donate a large number of plants and trees to Leeds charity  Getaway Girls, who featured on the BBC One series ‘DIY SOS: The Big Build’.

    Our products were used as part of a life-changing transformation of the charity’s new headquarters for BBC Children in Need 2022.

    Each year, the DIY SOS team take on a big build for Children in Need, with this year’s recipient being Leeds-based Getaway Girls.

    The charity

    Getaway Girls, which was established in 1987, is a fantastic organisation which has been supporting and empowering young women in Leeds for more than 30 years. The charity’s mission is to ensure that all young women and girls in the city region can lead a safe, healthy and fulfilled life.

    Their team focuses on six key areas: empowerment, collaboration, compassion, equality and inclusion, creativity and innovation, and voice and influence.

    The project

    The ambitious project saw a piece of land in Seacroft transformed into a new headquarters for the charity. Fully equipped with a multi-purpose activity space, creche, music and media studio, counselling rooms, office space, a full kitchen, parking space and a garden area.

    That’s where we came in!

    The plants

    Outdoor space is key to leading a healthy life, so we were delighted to donate 148 individual pieces across seven varieties of plants and trees to the project.

    Our supply included:

    • 25 Asplenium scolopendrium
    • 3 Acer palm. diss. ‘Garnet’
    • 30 Lavandula ‘Hidcote’
    • 20 Hosta ‘Sum and Substance’
    • 30 Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’
    • 10 Camassia quamash ‘Orion’ pack’ Bulbs
    • 30 Verbena bonariensis ‘Lollypop’

    Johnsons of Whixley is a three-generation family business located in North Yorkshire, equidistant between York and Harrogate, with over 100 years’ experience in growing and supplying trees, shrubs and plants to UK-wide planting schemes. Being at the heart of Yorkshire ourselves, this project was close to our hearts.

    This opportunity to support such an incredible local organisation was incredibly rewarding and we hope that the outdoor spaces created in this project will be enjoyed for years to come.

    If you have a project that you’d like us to get involved with, please don’t hesitate to contact a member of our team today.

    Posted 18th Oct 3:35pm
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  40. New staff members for the maintenance team - Darren and Owen

    New staff members for the maintenance team - Darren and Owen

    We have recently welcomed two new employees to the Johnsons maintenance team. Darren Smith joins us as Assistant Maintenance Manager, and Owen Chappell joins us as a Maintenance Assistant. See what they had to say about their new roles below.

    Darren Smith

    1.How did you celebrate getting your new role?

    I went out and had a beer with some friends.

    2. Where did you previously work, and how will it compare to your new role?

    I worked on gas as a civil engineer, i was also previously a mechanic.

    3. Tell us about your role at JOW; what does it involve

    I am Assistant manager to John price, my role involves fixing anything that breaks, servicing vehicles, and maintaining sites, including buildings, structures, roads, car parks, drainage, production beds and windbreaks.

    4. What are looking forward to most about your new role?

    I look forward to new challenges every day, as no day is the same.

    5. What do you think the challenges will be?

    Learning my way around all of the different sites, as they are pretty big.

    6. Tell us something you have learnt since joining the team:

    I have learnt many things, but I’d probably say learning about irrigation with Wayne as its not something I’ve been involved with before.

    7. What do you like to get up to outside of work?

    I enjoy watching and playing sports and spending time with my family.

    8. Favourite football team?

    Newcastle

    9. Have any hobbies?

    Football and golf.

    10. Favourite cuisine?

    Has to be Italian

    ———————————————————————————————————

    Owen Chappell

    1.Your role at Johnsons:

    Maintenance Assistant

    2. What will your role involve?

    It will involve assisting the maintenance team and fixing everything that I can.

    3. Where did you previously work?

    I worked in retail.

    4. What has been your favourite day at JOW since starting?

    Incinerator duty

    5. What would we find you doing on a weekend?

    Chilling

    6. What’s one item you couldnt live without?

    music

    7. Favourite holiday destination?

    Canada

    8. Favourite TV series?

    How I met your mother

    9. Your go-to takeaway?

    Thai

     

    Posted 11th Oct 11:33am
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  41. Johnsons staff members become mental health first aiders

    Johnsons staff members become mental health first aiders

    Johnsons employees Dave Barrett and Eleanor Richardson recently completed a two-day mental health course and became mental health first aiders.

    Johnsons consider mental health and employee well-being in the workplace a priority, the first aiders will be the go-to contacts for anyone who is going through some form of crisis or mental health issue at work.

    All 140 Employees at Johnsons will be encouraged to speak to the mental health first aiders who will then offer a listening ear and assist in informing them of the various agencies and helping advise on the available channels.

    Dave and Eleanor are also in talks with the senior management team within the company and hope to make improvements to support their newfound course qualifications they have already implemented a specific email address where employees can contact the mental health first aiders direct.

    Just as we all have physical health, we also have mental health. Like physical health, mental health can fluctuate from good to poor. Mental health can affect any of us irrespective of age, personality or background and can be an effect of experiences in our personal and working lives, or there might not even be a reason for it. Approximately one in four people in the UK will experience a mental health problem each year.

    Johnsons retail unit manager and newly trained mental health first aider, Dave Barrett said: “ I think it’s more important than ever to make sure that everyone’s mental health is taken as seriously as their physical health. It became apparent more than ever during lockdown the fragility of everyone’s mental health and the impact this can play on our everyday lives.

    I wanted to educate myself, so I can understand not only how to care for myself but also for others around me, both at work and at home.

    The fact that 1 in 4 of us will experience a mental health issue in any given year shows that people’s need to understand and offer help is so important.”

    Johnsons office and marketing manager, Eleanor Richardson added: “Mental health is not one-size-fits-all, it can affect every walk of life at different points in someone’s life, and people shouldn’t feel ashamed of struggling with their mental health.

    I hope people will feel comfortable coming forward and talking should they want to; Dave and I now have the tools, training and knowledge to actively listen to their situations and to help them.

    It also made me think about ways in which we can make improvements in the workplace and what else we can do to support our employees – watch this space!”

    Posted 10th Oct 8:55am
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  42. Congratulations Jack Witham

    Congratulations Jack Witham

    Congratulations to Jack Witham, who has been appointed Key Accounts Manager. Jack will be looking after several key Accounts nationally. Find out about Jack and his new role below:

    1)Congratulations on your new role Jack; how will you be celebrating?

    I am moving house so I will do a joint celebration when I move in there to celebrate, probably just get a takeaway and a few beers.

    2) How will your new role differ from your previous one?

    There are a lot fewer customers to look after now, but the amount of work won’t decrease. Some of the customers have a wide range of offices throughout the UK.

    3) What are you most looking forward to in your new role?

    It is always nice getting to meet and dealing with different people. I am looking forward to getting out on the road more and seeing customers.

    4) Any challenges so far?

    Not many at the moment, I suppose one of the challenges has been getting everyone informed that Andrew has left and I am looking after them. There is a lot of customers whom I have had to tell.

    5)How will your experience on the wider nursery help in your new role?

    Having good knowledge of the nursery helps massively when working in the office, you learn about plants and also about the timings it takes things to be done. This can help when deciding how late to put orders on.

    6) Tell us something we don’t know about you: Nothing interesting really but I have a degree in Sports Journalism. I probably said that in my last Q and A.

    7) What would we find in your packed lunch?

    There is always a yoghurt and an orange. The rest varies. My main course often depends on what is still in the fridge. I don’t have the most glamorous lunches ever.

    8) What do you like to get up to on a weekend?

    Throughout summer, I play cricket for Whixley. I’m not really sure what I do in winter; I will find out. Probably take the dog for lots of walks and explore new places around Thirsk.

    9) One item you couldn’t live without?

    Tomato Ketchup

    10) What is your dream holiday?

    Barbados has to be up there, definitely. Or I wouldn’t mind watching the Ashes in Australia.

     

    Posted 16th Sep 2:45pm
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  43. Onsite apiary struggles during the summer heatwave

    Onsite apiary struggles during the summer heatwave

    The bees at our onsite apiary had a good start to the year, with the early spring bringing plenty of nectar which increased bee numbers significantly and helped produce a good amount of honey.

    The apiary is managed by Harrogate and Ripon Beekeepers Association. , located at the top of our Newlands site, houses up to 800,000 bees during the summer months, with the insects pollinating flowering plants from all of our local sites.

    The heatwave meant that many flowering plants flowered early and for a shorter period than usual; the bees also used a lot of energy to keep the hives cool they do this by fanning their wings and collecting water to help prevent brood drying out. When honeybees are exposed to temperatures over 42 C for more than a few hours they are likely to suffer from heat stress which can result in death.

    The high temperatures weren’t the only threat to the hives this summer, as wasps benefitted from the warmer weather, causing some of our hives a problem in defending themselves. Wasps typically attack honeybee hives to steal nectar stores or even take larvae to feed their own young.

    Keith Simmonds, vice president of Harrogate and Ripon Beekeepers Association said: “Despite our bees’ challenges this summer, they have come through with their usual determination to survive and are preparing well for a long winter ahead.”

    The autumn worker bees are different to those in the summer as their fat-producing gene is switched on, so they put on as much weight as possible to stay warm. In comparison, overwintering bees can live for up to six months, while their siblings born during spring and summer survive for no more than six weeks as they work so hard collecting nectar and pollen for the colony.

    Tips on how to help bees

    • Provide water during summer – shallow dishes or bird baths with water will help.
    • Keep bee-friendly plants well hydrated.
    • Include drought-tolerant plants in your planting plans
    • Include pollinator-friendly plants and trees in your planting plans – click here for our blog post
    • Choose plants for bees throughout the seasons.
    • If you have a small garden, plant up seasonal containers to encourage bees.
    • Avoid using pesticides.
    • Provide shelters for bees such as stumps or even create your own bee hotel.

    Posted 15th Sep 12:58pm
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  44. Plant donation to York dementia care home

    Plant donation to York dementia care home

    We recently teamed up with award-winning garden designer Luke Arend to donate and supply plants to a Dementia care home in York.

    St Catherine’s in Shipton by Beningbrough is a dementia specialist care home run by Wellburn Care Homes, which has recently gone through a complete transformation after months of research, development, planning and design.

    The transformation sees innovative dementia-friendly interiors, gardens and exteriors added, all of which were installed with the needs of patients with dementia in mind.

    Garden designer Luke Arend worked to a brief to tempt residents outside and enjoy the garden with family members. It included functional requirements such as wheelchair access, safe paths with no anxiety-inducing dead-ends and clear edges, safe sensory plants (no poisonous, spiky, or thorny), plants which mark seasonal change, a safe water feature, dappled shade, clear views from the building and raised beds for interaction with the planting.

    Luke created concept plans and mood boards and spoke to residents and family members about the design and considered garden features, materials, furniture, lighting and safe plants to invoke a positive, beautiful environment and memories.

    Speaking about the benefits of the garden, garden designer Luke Arend said: “ there is now a strong body of evidence of the enormous physical and mental benefits of just being in a garden and nature for patients with dementia, including evoking memories, increasing confidence and socialisation, and importantly decreasing agitation.”

    The garden is now complete and includes wet-poor rubber flexible non-slip paths, a beautiful Victorian-style central Gazebo, raised beds, a water feature, furniture, sculptures and memory-invoking plants.

    The plant donation from Johnsons of Whixley was worth over £500 and included Hydrangeas, Skimmias, Echinaceas, Geraniums, Geums, Helleborus, Hostas, Lavenders, Lupins, Nepeta, Paeonia, Roses, Pulmonaria, Salvias, Vincas, Clematis, Buddleia and fatsia.

    The aim was to include plants that residents are familiar with to help invoke positive memories, including lavenders, tulips, geraniums and roses.

    Garden designer Luke Arend said: “It’s so rewarding to see residents and family members enjoying the garden and savouring being outdoors. A huge thank you to Johnsons of Whixley for supporting this project and making it a reality.”

    Discussing the donation, Johnsons marketing manager, Eleanor Richardson, said: “It’s great to give something back to our local community; there are currently around 900,000 people with dementia in the UK so it’s great to support our local Dementia care home. We hope our plants bring joy to residents, staff and visitors of the care home for many years to come.”

    Posted 8th Sep 2:27pm
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  45. A new role for Kieron Pattison

    A new role for Kieron Pattison

    Congratulations to Kieron Pattison, who was recently promoted to Deputy Despatch Unit Manager from Deputy Amenity Operations Manager, the shift in roles will see him working with the Despatch department, ensuring that stock is checked and entered into the correct bays ready for delivery. Find out what he had to say about his new role below:

    1. Any planned celebrations for the new role?

    I might take the family out over the weekend and enjoy what is left of the summer with a few cocktails, depending on the weather.

     

    2. How will it differ from your previous deputy amenity operations position?

    I will now be contributing towards despatching orders, ensuring orders are all in the correct bays and up to our quality standards. As well as dealing with customers who come and collect

     

    3. You recently passed the rising stars programme, how will this help you in your new position?

    The rising star programme will help with managing the team most efficiently and adapting to change, which is definitely required in my new role.

     

    4. What are you looking forward to most in your new role?

    Learning and facing new challenges, I am the type of person who thrives off new challenges and learning new skills, as it gives me that sense of achievement when I learn new skills and put them into practice. Also, this new role will give me a wider view of how the company operates from our yard to the main offices

     

    5. What do you think the challenges will be?

    I would say understanding how to load wagons (especially mixed loads) in the most safe and secure way, as this is an area where I have little to no experience, but I am looking forward to it

     

    6. Tell us something we don’t know about you:

    I enjoy binge-watching true crime documentaries on Netflix late at night when everyone is in bed

     

    7. What do you like to get up to outside of work?

    I sometimes go to the gym to keep myself active but mainly spend time with family and watch football.

     

    8. Favourite cuisine?

    Has to be Chinese; Singapore chow mein every time

     

    9. What is your favourite season?

    I would say spring as it’s not too hot or too cold. It is also a good feeling when you start seeing all plants start flowering.

     

    10. Are you a morning or night person?

    If I would have to choose, I would say night as I enjoy the peace and quiet when everyone in bed and I can breathe and relax.

     

    Posted 5th Sep 2:20pm
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  46. Plants used for multi-million-pound renovation at The Springs Resort & Golf Club

    Plants used for multi-million-pound renovation at The Springs Resort & Golf Club

    We recently supplied plants to the value of over £135,000 for a multi-million-pound renovation at the 133-acre The Springs Resort & Golf Club near Wallingford in Oxfordshire.

    The renovation works started in the autumn of 2020 at the resort that boasts a beautifully restored 19th-century manor house with hotel rooms, an 18-hole, par-72 golf course, a clubhouse with restaurant and bar, a Hydrotherapy pool and spa and a collection of luxury lodges all located just 30 minutes from Oxford City Centre.

    Johnsons were appointed by Darwin Escapes which operates the resort to supply thousands of quality plants as part of the renovation of the multi-million-pound resort and golf club.

    The nursery has been Darwin Escapes’ principal plant supplier for almost ten years supplying their holiday resorts including Sandymouth Holiday Resort, Keswick Reach Lodge Retreat, Canterbury Reach Lodge Retreat, Cheddar Woods Resort & Spa and Stratford-upon-Avon Lodge Retreat.

    The plants supplied by Johnsons have been used to enhance the grounds of the Tudor-style hotel building, clubhouse, golf course and spa grounds and most recently used to landscape the modern lodges which include private outdoor areas with hot tubs and landscaped decking, some of which have stunning views across the millpond.

    Plants Johnsons supplied to the project include a large number of hedging, shrubs, herbaceous, trees and grasses with varieties including mixed native hedging elements, Choisya, Geraniums, Heleniums, Hebes, Hydrangeas, Heucheras, Ilex, Lavender, Magnolia, Prunus, Stipa, Taxus, Viburnum and more.

    Eleanor Richardson, Marketing Manager at Johnsons, said: “We are pleased to be working with Darwin Escapes once again, and are honoured to be their principal plant supplier. It’s great to see our plants adding the finishing touches to this ambitious project, the grounds look fantastic and will certainly entice people to stay.

    We hope the plants are enjoyed by resort guests, golfers, staff and of course wildlife for many years to come. “

    Posted 24th Aug 10:58am
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  47. August Gardening Reminders 2022

    August Gardening Reminders 2022

    Summer isn’t over yet… August is usually a hot one, and there’s plenty to be doing in the garden this month, from watering to trimming lavenders and deadheading flowering plants to encourage new flowers. Read our full list of reminders below put together by our chairman and horticulturist John Richardson:

    Trim Lavenders after flowers go over, but don’t cut into last season’s wood as this may prevent future re-growth.

    Maintain the water level in ponds in order to prevent stress to fish, plants, and other pond life.

    Collect and dispose of fallen apples showing signs of Brown Rot, do not compost them.

    Keep dead-heading the best flowering plants to encourage new flowers and stop them from setting seeds. Apply a liquid feed as plants will require added nutrition to counter the dry weather and heavy watering.

    Always use really sharp secateurs when cutting roses or pruning any plant. Weed between alpines and top up the surface with grit or gravel.  Take cuttings of Aubretia, dwarf  Helianthemums etc., and root them in a warm propagator.

    Do not cut back paeonies which have flowered, just remove dead flower heads, as they need to die back naturally as a part of the ripening process.

    Towards the end of the month, cut down the fruited canes of raspberries to ground level, and tie in the young canes which will carry the fruits of next year’s harvest.

    Watch out for pests and diseases, warm, dry weather encourages mildew, and aphids can rapidly increase in numbers.  Treat with specific garden chemicals.

    Damp down greenhouse floors to maintain humidity, and don’t forget to open the vents to improve air circulation.  Best to water early morning or late evening, and not in the heat of the sun. Close doors at night by the end of the month as conditions become cooler but be sure to open up again the following morning!

    Collect the seed of plants you wish to regenerate again next year. Place a brown paper bag over the seed head and shake out contents as they become free; save the seed in the fridge and sow next spring.

    Take cuttings of shrubs, heathers, hydrangeas, and fuchsias.

    Container watering will still be a high priority, placing the container in a saucer-shaped dish will be a   great help in ensuring that the majority of water you apply remains available to the plant.

    Give a final trim to fast growing hedges, and don’t forget to remove the weeds from under hedges.

    Finish pruning stone fruits such as cherries and plums by mid-month. Choose a dry day in order to prevent disease entry through the wound.  If you have peaches or apricots under protection, prune them now to prevent silver leaf disease.

    Best to leave laying or sowing a new lawn until September when the weather is cooler and there is probably more moisture in the ground.

    Propagate Rhododendrons by layering a low growing shoot into some prepared compost beneath the bush. The shoot should be non-flowering, de-leafed in the wound area, and either twisted or nicked with a knife to produce a tongue and pinned down into the prepared mound of soil. Cover the whole area with an inch of compost and water thoroughly. Rhodo layers can take 2 years to produce a good new plant.

    Remove rose blooms as they fade. Cut roses for display as short as possible. Do not feed in the autumn as soft growth would be encouraged, which could not mature before winter.

    Posted 4th Aug 10:34am
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  48. From Despatch to desk - Steve Morton

    From Despatch to desk - Steve Morton

    Congratulations to Steve Morton, our previous Despatch Manager, who has been promoted to Operations Manager and will be leaving the outside despatch environment for the office.

    1. What will your new job role include?

    My new role will involve looking after the operations team in the top yard. In the office, I will be processing and allocating orders. I will also be helping with recruitment for operation’s needs and a lot of problem-solving.

    2. How will this differ from your previous role?

    My last job in despatch was very hands-on and physical. This job is more office based.

    3. What do you think the challenges will be?

    Recruitment and interviewing as these are new challenges for me.

    4. What are you most looking forward to?

    All the new challenges ahead and staying dry and warm in the winter.

    5. Tell us a funny story from your time at JOW:

    I have a lot of funny stories at JOW but nothing PG rating.

    6. Where would we find you on a weekend?

    Spending days out with my wife and four children they all keep me busy.

    7. If you had to be stuck in a lift with a star character, who would it be and why?

    I would love to be stuck in a lift with George Lucas so I could talk Star Wars with him.

    8. Proudest moment in life?

    Having all 4 of my children with my wife, Natasha.

    9. Drink of choice:

    Apple Jack Daniels & Coke

    10. Any Hidden Talents?

    I would say very good at building Lego, but my wife will tell you it’s being a terrible snorer.

    Posted 28th Jul 8:36am
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  49. A new role for Matt Campey

    A new role for Matt Campey

    Congratulations to Matt Campey who has been promoted to Despatch Unit Manager from his previous deputy position. Matt joined Johnsons in 2016 and has worked his way up with various roles along the way. See what he had to say about being promoted below:

    1) How will you be celebrating your new position at JOW?

    Plenty of beer and enjoying the great weather we are currently having.

    2) How will it differ from your previous position?

    More responsibility in terms of managing the Despatch team, Internal Transport, Stock checking and ensuring all stock enters the correct delivery bays.

    3) What are you most looking forward to within your new role?

    I’m looking forward to the new tasks and challenges that the job role brings. Improving my overall plant knowledge and being a department manager for the first time.

    4) What do you think the challenges will be?

    The biggest challenge for me will be co-ordinating stock from all other sites (UK & Abroad) and getting the stock back to our Newlands site and into our delivery bays for loading.

    5) A most memorable day at Johnsons:

    That has to be the 20:30 finish that I had with Steve Morton and Chris Pickard. The longest and most tiring day I’ve had at JOW.

    6) What do you enjoy doing outside of work?

    I enjoy sports, especially football and watching Leeds United. I like going for walks and getting out and about. I’m not one for keeping still, and I’ve always enjoyed exploring new places.

    7) Tell us a random fact about yourself:

    I have played football for both Leeds United and Middlesborough Academies.

    8) If you were deserted on an island, what’s the one luxury item you would take with you?

    A swiss army knife or an axe.

    Posted 27th Jul 10:54am
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  50. The Growers Choice: Plants for butterflies

    The Growers Choice: Plants for butterflies

    In recognition of The Big Butterfly Count, a UK-wide citizen science survey that runs for three weeks each summer, we have put together a list of plants for butterflies to help encourage them into your next planting plan.

    Echinacea varieties such as Magnus 

    Commonly known as coneflowers, Echinaceas are a firm favourite of butterflies and bees. Butterfly species, including Monarchs and Red admirals, particularly love Echinaceas.

    Echinaceas have daisy-like flowers with prominent orange centres and generally flower from mid-late summer and are available in a range of colours from pink, white and even yellow.

    ????Position: Full sun

    ???? Flowers: July – September

    ???? Height: Up to 75cm

    ???? Soil: Most soil types, except dry or boggy conditions

    Butterflies that particularly love this plant variety: Red Admiral butterflies and Peacock Butterflies

    Buddleia varieties such as ‘Pink Delight.’ 

    Commonly known as the ‘Butterfly Bush’ and colonising railway sidings, Buddleias make a great addition to a sunny border with attractive bright foliage that will attract butterflies and other insects.

    ????Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Flowers: July – September

    ???? Height: 30cm-280cm depending on the variety

    ???? Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

    Butterflies that particularly love this plant variety: Red Admiral butterflies and Peacock Butterflies

    Verbena varieties such as bonariensis 

    Tight clusters of lilac-purple flowers appear on tall flower stems from June to September. This plant will help encourage bees and butterflies into your project right through to autumn. A great addition to any area of a border due to its transparent shape.

    ????Position: Full sun

    ???? Flowers: June – September

    ???? Height: Up to 150+cm

    ???? Soil: Fertile, moist, well-drained soil

    Butterflies that particularly love this plant variety: Red Admiral Butterflies, Painted Lady Butterflies

    Helenium varieties such as ”Moerheim Beauty’

    Blooms are available in shades of yellows, oranges and reds from mid-late summer. They look great in a mixed border and look great amongst grasses and other perennials, and are loved by bees and butterflies.

    ????Position: Full sun

    ???? Flowers: June – August

    ???? Height: 60cm +

    ???? Soil: Fertile, moist, well-drained soil

    Butterflies that particularly love this plant variety: Red Admiral Butterflies, Peacock Butterflies

    Scabiosa varieties such as ‘Butterfly Blue’

    Are full of nectar-rich flowers from June – August and looks great in cottage gardens or in a wildflower mix. Plant in a sunny position to encourage butterflies and other pollinators to feast.

    ????Position: Full sun

    ???? Flowers: June – August

    ???? Height: 0.5m +

    ???? Soil: Fertile, moist, well-drained, alkaline soil

     

    Lavender varieties such as ‘Munstead’ and ‘Hidcote’ 

    Lavender will add fragrance and colour to your garden projects and will draw in the pollinators. A great addition to a path, or border. Place in a sunny, well-drained position for best results.

    ???? Flowers: July – September

    ????Position: Full sun

    ???? Height: Dependent on variety

    ???? Soil: fertile, well-drained soil

    Butterflies that particularly love this plant variety: Cabbage white butterflies

    Escallonia varieties such as ‘pink elle’

    A beautiful flowering evergreen shrub that bloom for months throughout the summer. Flower heads are available in shades of red, pink and even white and contrast beautifully with oval glossy green leaves.

    ???? Flowers: June – July and then again in September

    ????Position: Full sun

    ???? Height: Dependent on variety

    ???? Soil: fertile, well-drained soil

    Butterflies that particularly love this plant variety: Monarch butterflies

    Other popular butterfly-friendly plant varieties include: Sedum, Echinops, Aster, Monarda, Rudbeckia, Nepeta and Salvia.

    Click here for our blog post on pollinator-friendly plants throughout the season

    Posted 1st Aug 11:15am
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  51. Welcome to the team Sarah Milana

    Welcome to the team Sarah Milana

    Earlier this summer, we welcomed Sarah Milana to our growing team. Sarah joined the Procurement team as an Administrative Assistant; find out what she had to say about her time at Johnsons so far below:

    1. Tell us about your role at JOW; what does a normal day look like?

    So, working in the purchasing department, means you are working with a lot of numbers/prices from many different suppliers. Whilst still learning many of the plants, becoming accustomed to the various names too comes in handy. You work closely with the transport team; this ensures that the product that you buy will come in on time when we are going for collections. When it comes to collection abroad. From putting orders through to go and collect from abroad to doing stock transfers from our cash and carry, you’re also working closely with the outdoor staff as well. This means you are also not always inside.

    Additionally, I help with our non-conformities, so any product that hasn’t arrived or needs sending back I will work on the paperwork for, which then we can again, in the purchasing department, work with our sales team and get the correct product for the correct time for the customer.

    2. What did you do before working at Johnsons?

    Before coming to Johnsons, I worked two separate jobs: a bartender in the evening, and during the day, I worked for a broker firm, which dealt with trade waste.

    3. What has been your favourite day at Johnsons since starting?

    I would have to say when I worked outside for the first time, understanding how the product that we buy comes in from abroad and how you unload the plants and put them on the correct beds would probably be one of my favourite days since being here. Was nice and sunny too so was nice to help out the outdoor staff and have a feel of what they do too.

    4. What do you like most about working in horticulture?

    The fact that you are working with plants alone is most of the fun part, I love plants as it is, so learning all the different types of plants, herbs and trees that there are and having them imported in still from another country as well is what I would say is most thrilling.

    5. What do you like to get up to on a weekend?

    I usually tend to stay in if it’s a bit gloomy and just sit and draw/paint. Otherwise, I will spend time with either my other half or go see friends and contemplate which tattoo to get next.

    And if I don’t go get a tattoo, then going out with my friends in town is always the next best thing.

    6. Name one item you couldn’t live without?

    Headphones for my music

    7. Favourite holiday destination:

    I would love to go to New Orleans. However, I would also like to visit Greece as well and go to Athens.

     

    Posted 15th Jul 1:40pm
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  52. Welcome to the transport team Hannah Holland

    Welcome to the transport team Hannah Holland

    A warm welcome to Hannah Holland, who joined our transport team as a Logistics Administrator earlier this summer. Find out what she had to say about her new role below:

    1) Tell us about your role and what it involves:

    I assist both Hannah and Katie in their roles. Planning, confirming EU paperwork, managing ferry bookings and communicating with drivers daily.

    2) What have you enjoyed most about working at JOW?

    The friendly, nice and kind people, alongside the week’s variety! No day is the same.

    3) Where have you worked previously?

    I have a degree in fashion buying and merchandising. I worked as an assistant merchandiser for the Baird group. And really disliked I. It was like the real-life The Devil Wears Prada. Throughout university, I worked at mint velvet and was regularly given free clothes/ shoes and accessories.

    4) Tell us something you have learnt since joining the team:

    I could now look at a postcode and, without google, have a rough idea of its location.

    5) Night in or night out?

    During summer, nights out during winter nights in watching films.

    6) What do you like to get up to outside of work?

    I spend a lot of time in the gym. I LOVE a spin class. Sometimes I knit and get my sewing machine out too!

    7) Savoury or sweet food?

    Mostly savoury, Indian, Italian and Thai. But sweets are good too, Coco Joe’s in York and Pateley Bridge have the best hot chocolate you’ll have ever tasted.

    8) City break or a beach holiday?

    Definitely, beach, when I go on holiday I want nothing other than sitting on a sun lounger worshipping the sunshine reading a book, listening to music and people watching!

    Posted 14th Jul 4:16pm
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  53. July Gardening Reminders 2022

    July Gardening Reminders 2022

    July often brings more sunshine, which in turn requires more watering and weeding, among many other jobs in the garden, from dead-heading roses to clipping evergreen hedging and quickthorn. Check out our full hints and tips below.

     Water as soon as slowing growth rate shows that soil is drying out. Sandy soil requires half the water compared to clay soil.

    Continue tying dahlias to their stakes and spraying aphids and insects as necessary.

    Trim quickthorn hedges and continue hoeing and weeding hedge bottoms.

    Dead-head roses, trim to appropriate bud in the axil of a leaf shoot with five leaflets when the blooms have gone over. This will have a strong bud growing in the leaf axil, which should point in an outward direction.

    Always use sharp secateurs when cutting roses or pruning anything.

     Feed both established and newly planted roses with a rose fertilizer at the rate of about a handful per square metre, other than for a 15cm dia. clear circle around the stem of each plant. Hoe the fertilizer into the soil surface.

     Do not cut back paeonies which have flowered; just remove dead flower heads, as they need to die back naturally as a part of the ripening process.

    Check the moisture level of hanging baskets every morning and water thoroughly if dry. Feed plants with a soluble liquid once per week and remove flower heads that are going over.

    Clear foliage from ponds and remove weeds from around the edges and excess vegetation on water lilies.

     Cut Delphiniums down to 12-15cm after flowering and keep moist. They should produce another flush of flowers in the autumn.

    Evergreen hedges can be clipped this month (and some deciduous ones) but ensure no nesting birds are in the hedge. Cut laurel and Eleagnus hedges with secateurs to prevent cut leaves.

    July is a good month to take heather cuttings. Choose young, vigorous, half-ripe, non-flowering shoots. Treat the bottom 5cm of the cuttings with rooting hormone and insert the bottom around the edge of a 9cm pot. Keep in a closed, shaded frame, ensuring that water does not drip onto the cuttings from the underside of the glass. Do not allow the cutting to dry out.

     Prune pyracanthas by cutting back side-shoots to 2-3 leaves from their base for a good show next year. Wear gloves!! When the first flush of hardy geraniums and Alchemilla is over, cut them hard back for a spectacular second flush of flowers.

     Once per week, go around the garden and remove all dead-heads from flowers and clear away all vegetables that have finished cropping.

    The first week of the month is the best time to cut lavender for drying. Cut the whole flower stalk when it begins to show colour. Tie in loose bundles and hang in a greenhouse or warm shed to dry.

    Posted 7th Jul 10:44am
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  54. Johnsons supply historic Aldwark Manor Estate

    Johnsons supply historic Aldwark Manor Estate

    We have recently supplied over £25,000 worth of plants for the historic Yorkshire-based Aldwark Manor Estate.

    Johnsons were appointed by the new owners, who purchased the historic Estate in 2019, to supply hundreds of high-quality plants as the venue undergoes a significant renovation and expansion program. The hotel is located less than 10 miles from Johnsons HQ making it an ideal partnership.

    The plants will be used across the wedding garden, fountain bed and entrance to the estate.

    Johnsons supply has included Trees, hedging, herbaceous, shrub and topiary plants so far including varieties such as Buxus balls, Lavender, Hydrangeas, Tulips, Nepeta, Astilbes, Fagus, Acers and more.

    Since the acquisition, Aldwark Manor Estate has been undergoing an ambitious multi-million pounds extension and refurbishment project, with over £8m invested into phase one of the project which includes the total refurbishment of all the bedrooms, public areas and function suites. Phase two will see the opening of Bunkers in September 2022 with 11 bedrooms, a sports bar and restaurant, a golf shop and private room.

    The overall program is set to be completed by the end of 2024 with plans for a new spa and leisure complex to include a mezzanine pool overlooking the estate’s 185 acres in the Vale of York, beauty treatment areas, a leisure pool and gym, a conference centre and 40 new bedrooms, exclusive rooms with balconies and hot tubs. The Manor’s facilities also include an 18-hole golf course that will be fully redeveloped by the end of May 2023 with the addition of a boat house, and boat and water sports activities.

    Eleanor Richardson, Marketing Manager at Johnsons, said: “The team at Aldwark Manor Estate are currently in the process of implementing huge renovations to the historic estate and are creating a luxury experience for guests and visitors.

    “The whole Johnsons team are excited to be involved in the project and helping them create a tranquil space in the grounds of the estate and we are looking forward to continuing to work with them as the renovations continue.”

     

    Posted 7th Jul 9:31am
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  55. Johnsons plants help clinch Silver Merit Award and beautify Harrogate Hospital grounds

    Johnsons plants help clinch Silver Merit Award and beautify Harrogate Hospital grounds

    We recently sponsored and donated plants to a show garden at BBC Gardeners World Live via Harrogate-based Grant Horticulture and The Northern School of Gardening.

    Charlotte Jones from Grant Horticulture and The Northern School of Gardening won a Silver Merit at last week’s BBC Gardener’s World Live at the NEC in Birmingham.

    The award-winning beautiful border which included 300 plants to the value of almost £2,000 will now be donated to Harrogate Hospital, Johnsons and Grant Horticulture’s local hospital.

    21-year-old Charlotte Jones designed the Border under the theme ‘Wildlife’, which the designer interpreted as a reflection of someone who has lived a ‘wild life’, full of frivolity, fun and joie de vivre.

    Charlotte is currently studying for her master’s in Landscape Architecture at Sheffield University and is in her working year with Grant Horticulture and The Northern School of Gardening.

    The 300 plants donated will now be used to enhance Harrogate Hospital’s grounds and include varieties such as Achillea, Aquilegia, Astrantia, Digitalis, Geranium, Nepeta, Salvia, Iris, Lavender, Miscanthus, Erigeron and herbs including Mint, Thyme and Rosemary.

    Dean Bolton-Grant, Managing Director of Grant Horticulture and founder of The Northern School of Gardening said: “ Garden design is at the very heart of our business. With the pandemic behind us what better way to showcase our talents, in particular, our young designer Charlotte Jones, than with a show garden at BBC Gardener’s World Live.

    “We worked closely with Johnsons of Whixley who kindly donated the plants for our Beautiful Border Garden, affording us the opportunity to support Harrogate Hospital with the gift of the plants which we hope will bring patients and staff a little joie de vivre during their day.”

    Yvonne Campbell, Head of Charity and Business Development Project Manager at Harrogate hospital said: “On behalf of Harrogate Hospital & Community Charity I would like to say thank you to Johnsons of Whixley for this amazing donation and the opportunity to enhance our hospital grounds.  The donated plants have been distributed across the hospital to fill our staff and visitor areas with a touch of colour.

    “I would also like to congratulate Charlotte Jones and the team at The Northern School of Gardening and Grant Horticulture for winning a Silver Merit for their border design, a huge well done and thank you to everyone involved.”

    Marketing Manager at Johnsons of Whixley, Eleanor Richardson said: “ Congratulations to The Northern School of Gardening and Grant Horticulture on their Silver Merit award at BBC Gardeners World Live. We were delighted to sponsor the garden with plants to the value of almost £2,000 and are glad to be donating the plants to our local hospital, Harrogate. We look forward to seeing the plants in the ground and hope they bring joy to staff, patients and visitors at the hospital for many years to come,”

    Posted 23rd Jun 10:56am
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  56. Johnsons inspire garden designers of the future with Platinum Jubilee Competition

    Johnsons inspire garden designers of the future with Platinum Jubilee Competition

    We recently held a garden design competition for local primary schools in celebration of the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee Competition.

    Children from primary schools within a 15-mile radius of the nursery were invited to design a ‘Platinum Jubilee Garden’. They were asked to design a colourful garden and include details of the plants they would use, with prizes on offer for some of the best.

    Over 100 children within the area entered the competition with the winning child, eleven-year-old Theo Copley of Green Hammerton Primary School, receiving over £250 worth of plants for his school, along with several more for his own garden.

    The winning design featured a Land Rover, in recognition of the Royal Family’s loyalty and love for the iconic vehicle.

     

    Celebrating his achievement, Theo said: “I chose to design a Land Rover themed garden because the Queen drove and repaired Land Rovers in the second world war. They are very important to the Royal Family, so much so that Prince Philips’s coffin was carried in a specially-adapted Land Rover at his funeral.”

    Children in second and third place also received a collection of plants for their home gardens, and their respective schools were gifted a small assortment to add to their outdoor areas. Johnsons overall donation to schools within the area came to over £600.

    Marketing Manager, Eleanor Richardson, said: “It’s great to inspire the garden designers of the future with our competition. We were amazed by all of the fantastic entries, which made judging very difficult. We look forward to seeing the plants thrive in the grounds of the winning schools and hope it will remind them of the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee for many years to come.”

    Posted 13th Jun 10:57am
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  57. June Gardening Reminders 2022

    June Gardening Reminders 2022

    June brings with it extra sunlight, warmer temperatures, flowers in abundance and those pesky weeds. There’s plenty to keep you busy within the garden this month, from clipping topiary to cutting back Clematis. Check out our full hints and tips below.

    Continue to stake or support fast-growing plants with appropriate materials such as pea sticks, nets and canes.

    Lightly clip box edging and topiary to remove wandering shoots. Remember to provide feed and water, mainly if they have been growing in containers for some time.

    Trim back the flowering growth of Erica carnea varieties and top-dress with peat-free compost.

    Bulb foliage will be dying down this month, do not remove it until it has gone dry and yellow. Daffodil bulbs will be fine left in situ, but tulip bulbs need lifting carefully, cleaning, and drying off in shallow boxes. Keep well ventilated until ready for re-planting.

    June is the worst month for weed growth. Water with a contact weedkiller under hedges, shrubs, and on paths or crazy paving. Alternatively, use a sharp hoe to keep stirring the soil to prevent the growth of seedlings.

    Sow winter pansies, primulas, violas and Brompton stocks under glass. Foxgloves and wallflowers can be sown outside in a weed-free area of the border to flower next year.

    Do not use lawn mowings as a mulch for trees and shrubs if the lawn has been treated with a weedkiller.

    Plant out young dahlias by the middle of the month. Two or three weeks after planting, pinch out the tip of each leading shoot. This will encourage the production of further side shoots. Tie into stakes when about 18” tall with loose loops of raffia or string.

    During warm, settled weather, syringe sweet peas with a mist of clean, soft water in the early morning or after sunset. If ground watering is essential, give the soil a good soaking of about 3 gallons. Buds which turn yellow and fall off before opening is not a disease but may indicate too much moisture at the roots.

    To increase the number of strawberry plants, select strong runners or young established plants and dig a hole under the leaves. Fill the pot with compost and plant into it the rosette of leaves of the new plant. Peg it down firmly with a forked twig or wire staple and water in.

    Remove self-sown trees such as sycamore and ash from around the garden, and ensure they are removed from near house and wall foundations. Weedkillers effectively dispose of plants challenging to dig out.

    Clematis montana varieties have now finished flowering and will benefit from being cut back before the growth becomes a jungle!

     

     

     

     

    Posted 7th Jun 1:10pm
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  58. The Growers Plantspo - May Herbaceous

    The Growers Plantspo - May Herbaceous

    Add colour to your garden projects this month with May flowering herbaceous plants from varieties such as Allium to Tiarella there’s something for every spot.

    Allium varieties such as ‘Purple Sensation’ and ‘Mount Everest’

    ????Flowers:  May – June

    ???? Position: Full sun

    ???? Height: Up to 1.2m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Ajuga varieties such as Ajuga reptans ‘Catlin’s Giant’

    ????Flowers:  April – May (depending on the variety)

    ???? Position:  Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 0.45m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Astilbe varieties such as ‘Fanal’

    ????Flowers:  May – June, August (depends on the variety

    ???? Position: Full sun -partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist, humus, rich soil

     Pot size: 2L, 5L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Brunnera varieties such as macrophylla ‘Jack Frost’

    Tiny blue forget-me-not flowers appear against heart-shaped silver dusted leaves in spring. A beautiful groundcover plant for a shaded border.

    ????Flowers: April – May

    ???? Position: Partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 0.4m depending on the variety

     Soil: Fertile, humus-rich, moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L  (subject to availability and the variety)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Dicentra varieties such as ‘Bleeding Heart’

    Heart-shaped flowers appear in spring above fern-like green leaves. Great in a shady border or as part of a cottage garden planting plan.

    ????Flowers:  April – May

    ☀️ Position:  Full sun or partial shade

    Soil: Moist, humus-rich, preferably neutral to slightly alkaline

     Pot size: Available in 2L  and 3L pots subject to availability.

    ———————————————————————————————

    Erigeron varieties such as ‘Sea Breeze’ and Erigeron karvinskianus

    ????Flowers: May – October (depending on variety)

    ???? Position: Full sun

    ???? Height: Up to 0.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well drained soil

     Pot size: 2L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Erysimum ‘Bowles’s mauve’

    A long-flowering semi-evergreen with narrow, grey-green leaves. This perennial produces spikes of purple flowers from late February to July and will make a great addition to a long flowering sunny border.

    ???? Flowers: February – July

    ☀️ Position: Full sun

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained, neutral soil

     Pot size: Available in 2L pots subject to availability.

    ———————————————————————————————

    Euphorbia wulfenii

    Is filled with huge heads of yellow-green flowers with ‘bronze eyes’ from late March-May that tower above its bluish-green foliage. Great at the back of a sunny border.

    Available in 2L pots subject to availability.

    ????Flowers:  Late March-May

    ☀️ Position:  Full sun

    ———————————————————————————————

    Geum varieties such as ‘Totally Tangerine’, ‘Cosmopolitan’ and ‘Sunrise’

    ????Flowers: May – August (depending on variety)

    ???? Position: Full sun

    ???? Height: Up to 0.6m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 3L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Geranium varieties such as ‘Rozanne’ and ‘Max Frei’ 

    ????Flowers: May- October (depending on variety)

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 0.6m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Iris varieties such as pseudacorus, ‘Perry’s Blue’ and ‘Tamberg’

    ????Flowers: May-June

    ???? Position: Full sun

    ???? Height: Up to 1.2m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Well-drained, moderately fertile, neutral to slightly acidic soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability).

    ———————————————————————————————

    Lupinus varieties such as ‘Gladiator’, ‘Persian Slipper’ and ‘Red Rum’

    ????Flowers: June – July

    ???? Position: Full sun- partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 1.2m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L, 5L (depending on variety and subject to availability).

    ———————————————————————————————

    Tiarella varieties such as ‘Spring Symphony’ and ‘Pink Symphony’

    ????Flowers: May – July

    ???? Position: Partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 0.4m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Cool, moist, humus-rich soil

     Pot size: 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Tradescantia ‘Sweet Kate’

    ????Flowers: May – July

    ???? Position: Full sun – Partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 0.3m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist but well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ——————————————————————————–

    Please note the above plants listed are subject to availability and is not an exhaustive list of what is available, please contact your sales rep direct for specific requests.

    Posted 18th May 3:01pm
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  59. Welcome to the team Adam Davis

    Welcome to the team Adam Davis

    A warm welcome to Adam Davis, who joins the sales team as our southern sales rep; find out about Adam’s hobbies and new role below:

    1. What will your new job role include?

    Developing the sales and profitability of our Amenity sector, through the management of existing accounts and by seeking out, and developing, relationships with new customers.

    2. What are you looking forward to most in your new role?

    Getting to know the customers and identifying new business opportunities available.

     3. What do you think the challenges will be?

    Continuing to exceed our customer’s expectations around lead time, whilst working within the ever-increasing legislation and environmental uncertainties.

    4. Where did you previously work, and what was your role?

    As an estimator for a kitchen manufacturer – supplying kitchens, on a large scale, to new build developments and refurbishments.

    5. Anything you have learnt so far that you didn’t know before?

    I have already learnt too much to list! Particularly lots of (Latin) plant names!

    6. What do you like to get up to outside of work?  

    I enjoy most sports, mainly playing football and road cycling. I am also part of a running club. I enjoy growing veg and cooking with less commonly used ingredients. But of course, my favourite past-time must be wrestling with my two young boys!

     7. Favourite meal?

    I’ll happily eat most things. As a true Yorkshireman, put gravy on it, and I’m there!

    8. What football team do you support?

    York City FC

    9. You have an allotment; what do you like to grow?

    I love growing chillies, however, I’m trying to grow more alternative veg’, such as fennel.

    10. Skiing or a beach holiday?

    I’d have to say skiing, although I have been skiing indoors in Dubai, so maybe you can have both!

    Vicky Newell, Amenity Sales Manager said: “We are thrilled to have Adam Davis join our Amenity sales team; he will primarily be looking after our customers in the South of England. We wish him well as he settles into his new role”.

    Posted 26th Apr 1:49pm
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  60. Staff achieve over 11 million steps and raise over £700 during March for Cancer Research

    Staff achieve over 11 million steps and raise over £700 during March for Cancer Research

    Johnsons staff have achieved over 11 million steps during March as part of the Cancer Researches Walk All Over Cancer Challenge.

    The staff involved in the challenge raised a combined amount of £736.50 for the Cancer Research Charity and achieved a combined step count of 11.4 million steps.

    28 members of staff at the nursery pledged to walk 10,000 steps each day during March and an internal challenge was organized where staff members merged into teams of four. The team with the most steps during March won a prize from the company.

    The winning team ‘Retatch’ included Steven Morton, Matt Campey, Katalin Dacre and Martyn Osbourne who achieved a whopping 2.3 million steps combined.

    The team were able to rack up their steps during the working day on the nursery with the average outside worker clocking up 10,000-15,000 steps per day, they would then go for additional walks on an evening and weekend.

    Staff taking part in the challenge also included Hannah Holland, Hannah Smith, Katie Short, Frances Whyte, Sarah Greenwood, Hannah Smith(2), Vicky Newell, Tony Coles, Andrew Barker, Adrian Price, Rob Forrester, Terry Cooper, Eleanor Richardson, Rachael McPherson, Chris Davis, Tracey Richardson, Tom Chilton, Mick Huby, Russ Berkley, Alex Harmon, Isaac Onions, Claire Horner, Jonathan Richardson and Dmytro Orlov.

    Walks completed in the challenge include nursery walks, Mam Tor to Kinder Scout, Knockan Crag National Nature Reserve, Duncansby Stacks, Brimham Rocks, Whitby, The Stray, Harrogate and Wentworth Castle Gardens.

    All staff taking part received a cancer-research t-shirt, Johnson’s water bottle and a certificate for completing the month’s challenge.

    Marketing Manager and challenge organizer, Eleanor Richardson said: “ The walking challenge has had many benefits, from team building to improved mental health. Staff have been walking together on a lunchtime, purposely going further afield for walks on evenings and weekends and have all felt the benefits mentally and physically.

    Not to mention the positive impact the fundraising has provided too knowing we have raised vital funds for the world’s leading cancer charity dedicated to saving lives through research. We are over the moon with the funds raised which is what this challenge was all about.”

    Cancer Research is the world’s leading cancer charity dedicated to saving lives through research, influence and information. The funding supports anything from a new research centre to glass slides that are used to analyse cancer cells. Globally cancer research invests 400 million dollars each year across prevention, diagnosis and treatment. Over the last 40 years, cancer survival rates in the UK have doubled. In the 1970s just 1 in 4 people survived their disease for 10 years or more. Today 2 in 4 survive. cancer researchers’ ambition is to accelerate progress and see 3 in 4 patients survive the disease by 2034.

    Posted 11th Apr 11:37am
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  61. Competition: Design a Primary School Platinum Jubilee Garden and win £250 worth of plants for your school

    Competition: Design a Primary School Platinum Jubilee Garden and win £250 worth of plants for your school

    To celebrate the Queens Platinum Jubilee and gardening, we have created a competition for local Primary Schools to design a  Platinum Jubilee Garden and win £250 worth of plants for their school.

    What do you have to do?

    • Download the competition pack here  Competition School Jubilee Garden
    • Draw your Primary School Platinum Jubilee Garden within the white box provided.
    • Get someone to help you label it so we can see what is in it.
    • Make it full of colour: you can use paints, pens, crayons, magazine cut-outs etc.
    • Ask your teacher or parent/guardian to photograph or scan your entry and email it to marketing@nurserymen.co.uk. By Friday 20th May 2022. Make sure to include your name, age and the school you attend.
    • Our Marketing Manager and a local garden designer will judge the entries.

    What will I win?

    • £250 worth of plants for your school
    • A certificate
    • Ten plants for your own garden

    Those in 2nd and 3rd place will win a plant for their own garden.

    Terms and Conditions 

    • You must be aged 11 or under to enter.
    • The school you are applying from must be within a 15-mile radius from us.
    • The competition will end at midnight on Friday 20th May 2022.
    • The winner will be announced on Monday 23rd May 2022.
    • Entries may be featured on our social media, but names will be removed.
    • The winner and garden will be featured on our website, PR and social media platforms.
    • The Promoter will deliver at a convenient time to the winning school for free.
    • There is only one £250 donation of plants available.
    • The Promoter will not take responsibility for any failure to the plant once the prize is received; replacements cannot be issued.
    • Entires who did not win will not be contacted.
    • In the event of any dispute regarding the terms and conditions, the conduct, results, and any other matters relating to this prize draw, the decision of the Promoter shall be final, and no correspondence or discussion shall be entered into.
    • By entering, applicants agree to the above terms and conditions.

    For further information or any questions please email marketing@nurserymen.co.uk

    Posted 7th Apr 3:26pm
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  62. Collection for Ukraine

    Collection for Ukraine

    We have all been devastated by the recent news in Ukraine and have started a collection of items needed. Staff, customers and suppliers can donate items which we will then organise going to the Yorkshire to Ukraine group.

    Yorkshire to Ukraine is run by local people and businesses who have joined forces to start collecting donations and transporting them to Ukraine. So far they have organised and transported 13 vans/trailers, and 5 Artics full to the brim of donations.

    More information on the charity can be found below:

    https://www.facebook.com/yorkshiretoukraine/?hc_ref=ARSClO1twUfC5gK3TkY8Y9bV2uwUl4t88gwdWkhcETyvKnS16RPa-VzJjuWNT3X84B8&fref=nf

    If you wish to add to our collection, please leave goods in our reception area or contact marketing@nurserymen.co.uk.

    Items needed include:

    – Food (Dried food (something they can cook easily), Canned foods, Children’s juices in plastic bottles, baby bottles, baby formula, protein bars)

    – Hygiene products (Nappies, wet wipes, sanitary items, toilet paper, disinfection products, shampoo, conditioner, shower gel, toothpaste and toothbrushes)

    – Linen (Camp beds, sleeping mats/yoga mats, sleeping bags, bedding, towels, blankets, duvets and pillows)

    – First Aid (Bags, dressings, gloves, bandages, painkillers, cough and cold medicine, children’s medicines)

    – Clothing (Brand new. Winter gloves and hats for children and adults, socks, thermals, socks and shoes)

    – Electronics (Power banks, torches, batteries)

    Once we have a large number of items, we will deliver them to the Yorkshire to Ukraine group direct.

    Posted 7th Apr 8:52am
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  63. April Gardening Reminders 2022

    April Gardening Reminders 2022

    Spring is finally here, with trees starting to bloom, daffodils and tulips starting to emerge and bees making an appearance for their first nectar collections. There’s plenty to be doing in the garden this month from deadheading flowering bulbs to applying lawn fertilizer. Check out our latest reminders, put together by our Chairman and Horticulturist John Richardson.

    Prune early flowering shrubs such as Forsythia & Hamamellis after flowering is over.

    Mulch shrubs and fruit bushes when the weather begins to warm up, but not deeply into the centre of the shrub.

    Soak rootballs of new evergreen shrubs before planting and water in after planting.

    Propagate perennials such as Rudbeckias, Heleniums and Monardas by dividing older plant stools, ensuring that you choose a healthy outer section.

    Divide and replant primroses when they have finished flowering.

    In mild weather slugs and snails may well begin to eat the shoots of newly growing perennials. Use environmentally approved slug pellets as a control.

    Continue to dead-head spent daffodils, tulips and other late wintering flowering shrubs.

    Towards the end of the month collect woody twigs to use as supports for perennials before they get too long and straggly.

    Apply residual weedkillers to gravelled driveways and footpaths. Be careful to ensure that the application is confined to the treated area and not the surroundings.

    Begin mowing the lawn weekly, but with the blades set quite high until the rate of weeds that suddenly appear, give the lawn a top-dressing of high Nitrogen fertilizer.

    Make sure old leaves of Helleborus have been removed.

    Tie in the young growth of climbing plants and trained plants. Pinch out some of the young growths if new shoots are too prolific.

    For more hints and tips head to our solution page here

    Posted 7th Apr 9:23am
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  64. May Gardening Reminders 2022

    May Gardening Reminders 2022

    May has arrived as bulbs start to fade in borders and are replaced by vibrant flowering herbaceous and shrubs as summer is on its way. Now is the perfect time to prepare your garden for summer. Check out our latest reminders, put together by our Chairman and Horticulturist John Richardson.

    Prune early flowering shrubs such as Forsythia after flowering is over. Remove deadwood and thin shoots to keep older bushes in shape.

    Pick off dead flower heads of Rhododendrons and Azaleas to allow new growths to develop, and mulch with leaf mould.

    Dahlias may begin to sprout in mild conditions under glass, but don’t plant out until frost is past. Consider taking cuttings of the first shoots.

    Some plants like Forget-me-Nots can spread very rapidly from seed. To contain them, pull up the plants as soon as they finish flowering to prevent them from seeding everywhere.

    Trim lawn edges frequently to develop a firm edge which will not sink when walked upon.

    In dry spells, continue to water those trees and shrubs planted since Christmas.

    If you have not used weedkiller to treat the lawn this Spring, use the grass mowings to mulch trees and hedge plants.

    Propagate greenhouse plants, mainly foliage and climbing plants. Increase shading as necessary, and watch out for those odd late frosts.

    Pick off the flower heads from spent daffodils, tulips, and other spring-flowering bulbs which have gone over, and give a top-dressing of general fertiliser.

    In mild weather, slugs and snails may well begin to eat the shoots of newly growing perennials. Use environmentally approved slug pellets as a control.

    Start spraying roses regularly against greenflies using a systemic insecticide. Remove rolled-up leaves containing Tortrix caterpillar or sawfly grubs and destroy.

    Continue to stake tall herbaceous plants such as Delphiniums. Pinch out the tips of other tall-growing plants. Thin out the older weak shoots from the centre of plants more than three years old.

    Apply residual weedkillers to gravelled driveways and footpaths. Be very careful to ensure that the application is confined to the treated area and not surroundings.

    Begin mowing the lawn weekly, but with the blades set quite high until the rate of growth increases. Dig out those perennial weeds that suddenly appear.

    Continue to support glasshouse grown tomato stems and remove side shoots regularly.  Feed every week or 10 days after the fruits begin to swell. Stop laterals growing from the main stems of cucumbers and remove all male flowers and tendrils.

    Remove raspberry suckers coming up away from the bed row. Thin new canes to 15cm. apart on the support wires.

    For more hints and tips head to our solution page here

    Posted 29th Apr 10:46am
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  65. Plant donation helps Baby Rainbow Memorial Garden bloom

    Plant donation helps Baby Rainbow Memorial Garden bloom

    We have recently donated a number of plants to help create a Baby Memorial Garden in Scunthorpe, North Lincolnshire.

    The Baby Memorial Garden was thought of by parents Andrew and Donna Clifford who tragically lost their baby son, Rory when he was just nine days old in 2019 from sudden infant death syndrome.

    The garden is located in Scunthorpe’s Central Park and will be planted with as much colour as possible to celebrate Rory’s life. Plants donated to the project have included shrubs, trees, hedging, herbaceous and bulbs.

    The rainbow garden will provide a space for parents and families to remember, reflect and commemorate Rory’s and other children’s lives that have been lost before, during or after pregnancy in a beautiful, quiet but colourful space.

    Rory’s father Andrew Clifford said: “Rainbows have been incredibly significant to us since Rory’s passing. It rained for many days after he died and we included lots of rainbows at his funeral because we wanted to celebrate his short life with lots of colours. If a rainbow ever comes out, we tell our children that Rory is here with us and in our hearts, and we think that is true for every family who has lost a baby.

    “Rainbows have continued to play a significant part in our own grieving process, and that is why they have such a profound meaning in this project.”

    Johnsons are just one of the 16 supporters of the Memorial Garden with Hedges Direct, Silica Lodge Garden Centre, SC4, EC Surfacing Ltd, Direct Plants, North Lindsey College, North Lincolnshire Council, Trees Direct, Decorative aggregates and Axholme Turf & Topsoil all offering support and donations.

    Discussing the donation, Johnsons of Whixley’s Marketing Manager, Eleanor Richardson added: “We look forward to seeing the garden come together in the following months ahead and hope the garden can provide an area where Rory’s parents and other families can reflect and remember the lives of babies tragically taken from us too soon.”

    If you would like to donate, volunteer or fundraise for the memorial garden visit the Baby Rainbow Memorial Gardens website for more information.

    Posted 25th Mar 11:29am
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  66. Important notice: order delays possible

    Important notice: order delays possible

    Important notice: order delays possible

    On Thursday, 17th March, P&O ferries announced that they were making up to 800 seafarers redundant and have suspended all upcoming sailings, as you may have already seen in the news.

    The leading ferry firm between Dover and Calais is one that Johnsons of Whixley use on a weekly basis. We don’t currently know when these services will resume, and our transport department is working tirelessly to resolve and rebook other ferries. However, millions of businesses are in the same boat meaning substantial delays are imminent.

    If you have an upcoming order that is likely to be affected, your sales rep will be in touch regarding possible implications for your consignment.

    If you have any immediate concerns, please get in touch with your sales representative directly, or call the mainline on 01423 330234.

    Posted 18th Mar 8:54am
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  67. Johnsons staff pledge to walk 280,000 + steps during March for Cancer Research

    Johnsons staff pledge to walk 280,000 + steps during March for Cancer Research

    Staff at our nursery and in our office have pledged to walk 10,000 steps each during March as they take part in Cancer Researches, Walk All Over Cancer Challenge.

    Throughout March 28 staff members at Johnsons  from different departments will walk a total of 280,000 steps combined which equates to approximately 140 miles per day, 980 miles per week and an overall estimate of 5,000 miles for the month.

    The company’s marketing manager, Eleanor Richardson has organised the internal challenge, where staff members will aim to do 10,000+ steps each day during March. The staff will be divided into teams of four and the team with the most steps during March will win a prize from the company.

    Staff at the horticultural nursery taking part have received a Johnsons water bottle and a cancer research t-shirt. They will record their steps on their smartphones and pedometers for the month and will share photos of their weekly walks on their social media platforms.

    Staff at Johnsons involved with the team challenge include Andrew Barker, Adrian Price, Rob Forrester, Terry Cooper, Sarah Greenwood, Hannah Smith (Sales), Vicky Newell, Tony Coles, Hannah Holland, Hannah Smith (Transport), Katie Short, Frances Whyte, Ellie Richardson, Rachael McPherson, Chris Davis, Tracey Richardson, Katalin Dacre, Martyn Osbourne, Steven Morton, Matt Campey, Isaac Onions, Claire Horner, Jonathan Richardson, Dmytro Orlov, Tom Chilton, Mick Huby, Russ Berkley and Alex Harmon.

    Team 2 Steps Ahead – Andrew Barker, Adrian Price, Rob Forrester, Terry Cooper.

    Team Not so fast but furious – Sarah Greenwood, Hannah Smith (Sales), Vicky Newell, Tony Coles.

    Team Retatch – Katalin Dacre, Martyn Osbourne, Steven Morton, Matt Campey.

    Team No Drama Stacking Bananas – Isaac Onions, Claire Horner, Jonathan Richardson, Dmytro Orlov.

    Team Roecliffe Ramblers – Tom Chilton, Mick Huby, Russ Berkley, Alex Harmon.

    Team Sole Sisters – Ellie Richardson, Rachael McPherson, Chris Davis, Tracey Richardson.

    Team 8 Legged Cat – Hannah Holland, Hannah Smith (Transport), Katie Short, Frances Whyte.

    Cancer Research is the world’s leading cancer charity dedicated to saving lives through research, influence and information. The funding supports anything from a new research centre to glass slides that are used to analyse cancer cells.

    Globally cancer research invests £400 million each year across prevention, diagnosis and treatment. Over the last 40 years, cancer survival rates in the UK have doubled. In the 1970s just 1 in 4 people survived their disease for 10 years or more. Today 2 in 4 survive. Cancer Researchers’ ambition is to accelerate progress and see 3 in 4 patients survive the disease by 2034.

    Discussing the fundraising, Johnsons of Whixley marketing manager, Eleanor Richardson said: “Statistics show that 1 in 2 UK people will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime.

    “Sadly, we all know someone we have lost to cancer or know someone who has survived it.  Without the cancer research carried out, we wouldn’t have the treatments and have the information we do today to treat and survive cancer. The steps challenge is a great way to fundraise for the charity and a great activity for team building and general fitness there are many benefits to walking 10,000 steps per day.”

    If you would like to support Johnsons walking challenge, you can visit their fundraiser and donate here https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/johnsonsofwhixley all money raised will go directly to Cancer Research.

    Posted 2nd Mar 4:04pm
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  68. A stock role for Rachael Mcpherson

    A stock role for Rachael Mcpherson

    Congratulations to Rachael Mcpherson on her new role as Stock Assistant, Rachael is a great addition to the team, and her experience in the retail department has put her in good stead for this new role where she will be making sure stock levels and locations are correct. See what she had to say about her new role below:

    1) Where did you work previously?

    I worked in retail on the line prepping all the plants for the garden centres.

    2) Where did you work before Johnsons?

    I worked for Jigsaw, a clothing brand.

    3)What does your new role involve?

    My new role involves counting and checking all the stock making sure everything is where it should be as well as putting all production orders onto to the system and making stock saleable as quickly as we can.

    4) What have the challenges been so far?

    Definitely getting my head around the computer side of the role anyone who knows me knows I’m the least tech-savvy person going.

    5) What do you like most about your career in horticulture?

    I love that I have the option to work outside amongst the plants, its such a nice environment to work in.

    6) What do you like to get up to outside of work?

    Hiking, camping, travelling anything outdoorsy really.

    7) Tell us something we don’t know about you?

    I am a florist and run my own business alongside my full-time job.

    8) Favourite holiday destination?

    To date, Iceland.

    Posted 2nd Mar 11:32am
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  69. Welcome to the team Frances

    Welcome to the team Frances

    A warm welcome to Frances Whyte, who joins the team as our HR Administrator as Chris Davis retires after 22 years of service at the end of March; Frances is already proving to be a great addition to the team and has a great career ahead of her, see what she had to say about her new role below:

    1. What will your new role include?

    My new role will involve being responsible for all of the different elements of HR administration at Johnsons of Whixley.

     

    2. Where have you worked previously?

    Previously, I worked as a primary school teacher in York for several years, teaching children in Year 5 and 6.

     

    3. What skills do you think you will transfer from your old career to your new career?

    Managing a varied workload and juggling lots of different tasks!

     

    4. What are you looking forward to most?

    I’m really looking forward to starting my career in HR and learning lots of new skills.

     

    5. What do you think the biggest challenge will be?

    Remembering everybody’s names and where they all work!

     

    6. Tell us something you have learnt since being here:

    I’ve learnt a lot already – how to use the time and attendance systems, how to issue contracts of employment, how to create and maintain personal files and so much more!

     

    7. What have you enjoyed the most since starting?

    I’ve really enjoyed getting to know everyone that I’ve met so far, and also working in an office environment.

     

    8. Tell us something you enjoy getting up to outside of work:

    Outside of work, I enjoy reading, photography and spending time with my friends and family.

     

    9. What is your favourite dish?

    Definitely pizza!

     

    10. Favourite TV show?

    My favourite TV shows are Brooklyn 99, The Office and Schitt’s Creek.

     

     Marketing Manager Eleanor Richardson said: “Frances is a bright and bubbly character, who is a great asset to the business; its been great to have her join our team; I look forward to working with her going forward and wish her all the best with her HR career.”

     

    Posted 25th Feb 11:11am
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  70. A warm welcome to Paul

    A warm welcome to Paul

    A warm welcome to Paul Whellans, who joins our sales team as an estimator. He is a great addition to the team and is settling in well with the sales team and wider office. See what he had to say about his role and joining Johnsons below:

    1)How have you found your first few weeks at Johnsons and what have you enjoyed most?

    Enjoyed the outdoor work after 20+ years in an office, In all honesty, had a bit of wobble when I joined the estimating team so soon as it’s so in-depth however I’ve given myself some credit and now I’m really enjoying the work.

    2)Tell us something you’ve learnt that you didn’t know before:

    Probably navigating SAP, I used it many years ago in utilities and it wasn’t user friendly for that industry but for stock control and pricing its been spot on.

    3)What do you think the biggest challenge will be?

    Getting to grips with the millions of varieties we offer.

    4)What was your previous job role?

    Customer Mortgage Expert for Barclays.

    5)You recently moved from the North East, what will you miss the most?

    Running with the pooch along the beach.

    6)What do you like most about Yorkshire (Gods County)?

    So far the quiet, small village life isn’t too bad.

    7)Favourite season and why:

    Has to be summer, love the heat. Actually don’t mind the winter (lived in Nova Scotia, Canada) for 6 years and experienced -31 most winters although not a fan of rain.

    8)What do you enjoy getting up to outside of work?

    Walk’s with the dog, coffee in front of the log burner, travel and anything fitness related, attended a few bodybuilding expo’s in Vegas and Ohio.

    General Amenity Sales Manager Vicky Newell said: “Paul has been a great asset to our team, he has settled into estimating really well, it feels like he has been here for years even though he has only been with us a few weeks.”

    Posted 25th Feb 10:34am
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  71. Farewell Chris Davis

    Farewell Chris Davis

    Farewell to Chris Davis our HR Administrator who retires after 22 years at Johnsons of Whixley at the end of March, Chris has provided support to all business areas for many years and has developed an unrivalled ‘plate spinning’ capability as she dashes from one task to the next in the office and beyond; we thank you for your hard work, loyalty and commitment, you will be greatly missed.

    1) Where did you work prior to Johnsons?

    • Harrogate General Hospital – I was an auxiliary nurse on the then maternity ward
    • Knaresborough Hospital – I was an auxiliary nurse on the rehabilitation wards
    • Various nursing homes –nursing assistant working the night shifts, which fitted around having my children.
    • Sainsbury’s – I was checkout assistant and then Customer service supervisor

    2) What roles have you had while working at Johnsons?

    Order processor, General Admin Manager, Customer Service Manager, HR coordinator / Admin Manager.

    3) What was your happiest experience at this company?

    There have been a few, attending company functions etc but receiving an email of thanks from one of our advisors was lovely and meant a lot.

    4) What will you miss the most?

    Chatting with colleagues

    5) Tell us a funny story from your time at Johnsons: Ian Nelson as he passed me, would sometimes push me around the office on my chair, he did not do it all the time so it was a surprise when he did.

    6)What advice would you give to the person taking on your role?

    Expect the unexpected every day and you will have a busy timetable.

    7)If you could have worked anywhere else, where would it have been?

    Can’t think of anywhere otherwise I would have gone

    8)What changes have you seen in the company over the years?

    The number of the office staff has doubled and there have been massive technology and system changes, therefore some of the intimacy we had has unfortunately been lost.

    9)What is the first thing you will do when you retire?

    Hopefully get a full night’s sleep, not waking up thinking of stuff. I will enjoy and make good use of my free time.

    Group Managing Director, Graham Richardson said: ” Even in our long 101year history, few staff members could boast such a significant and influential impact on our business. Chris’s can-do attitude and unshakeable reliability are simply unique, she will be greatly missed.” 

     

    Posted 21st Feb 3:27pm
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  72. A fond farewell to Ian Nelson

    A fond farewell to Ian Nelson

    We bid a fond farewell to Ian Nelson at the end of this month as he retires after 36 years + of service with us at Johnsons. Ian has been involved with many different positions across the nursery, from general nursery work to spraying and production manager from 2003 until recently. See what he had to say about his time at Johnsons below:

    1) How long have you worked at JOW for? If you exclude my Student middle year, then it’s 36.5 years.

    2) Did you work anywhere else prior to Johnsons? Yep, loads of places. I left school (their decision) in 1971, aged 15. I started out dairy farming, which I liked as a job, but had to live in a weird family!! I did a heap of jobs over the next couple of years (you could leave a job in the morning & line up another one in the day) – my shortest job was 45 minutes in the Ansaphone factory, which definitely wasn’t for me. I was scaffolding for some time before making a career choice of nursing which was good for 3 years or so. Ultimately, I started with the plants for Darlington Borough Council in 1979 and realised this was what I wanted to do, so I studied at night school for A Levels & went to Askham Bryan to do an HND (& I have never looked at those files since!!). Although it wasn’t a conventional early career, and I wasn’t the most reliable of employees, all those jobs I did gave me something.

    3) What roles have you been involved in on the nursery? I can rightly claim it is from the bottom up. I Did my shift of tying-up roses. The first promotion was taking charge of the spraying. That grew into being Technical Manager. Things got bolted on to that remit as the nursery grew. I moved over to being Production Manager at the very start of 2003.

    4) What have you enjoyed the most about your time at JOW? a bit corny but it is mostly about the people. There’s been a good team spirit. The culture of the company has suited me. Quite possibly would have been sacked years ago in a wholly conventional workplace. I am a plants-person, so the new introductions and range changes kept me interested, and you can’t escape the fact that you do get satisfaction from successes that you’ve been an integral part of.

    5) Funniest memory from working here? Well, Terry & Dave wouldn’t be too impressed, and I am probably going back 25+years, but Cyril Burnham driving the Land Rover in the fields at Endfield had us laughing. He was 65 & had never driven a vehicle before. You missed a character for those of you who don’t remember him, Tweedy. Perhaps now there aren’t as many characters as there were – Yapper, Jim Illingworth would brighten up your day even when you were working in a muddy field.

    6) If you could have done any other career, what would it have been? In a perfect world, I’d have liked to have been an architect – and designed something that was still admired years later.

    7) What has changed most over the years? That depends on how long you look back. Going right back to when I started was an extremely seasonal job. At times it was a struggle to keep looking busy in the summer, but in the ‘season’, you’d find yourself lifting trees in the pitch black and then bagging & loading until 9.00 in the evening. Over the last 20 years, change has been more gradual, we’ve got bigger and probably better, but radical change is less evident.

    8) Any exciting plans for retirement? I’m going to have a little business, but I want to work only part-time. I’m a Director at the golf club and have responsibilities there. Now that travel is becoming more feasible; we’ll be travelling again, still many countries to experience. I expect we’ll spend more time up at the cottage in Scotland. So plenty to look forward to. But I’m sure it will, certainly initially, feel strange not coming to the place you’ve been arriving at before 7.30 for the last 35+ years.

    Robert Richardson took over from Ian Nelson in 2020; you can find out more about him and production at Johnsons 100 years on by clicking here

     

    Posted 8th Feb 11:45am
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  73. A new role for Sarah Greenwood

    A new role for Sarah Greenwood

    Congratulations to Sarah Greenwood who has recently taken on a duo role as Sales Estimator/Administration Assistant, see what she had to say about the  new role below:

    1)What will your duo role involve?

    A combination of assisting with quotes for Estimating and general Sales Operations admin for example altering orders and Seed Certificates.

    2)What are you looking forward to most in your new role?

    Expanding my knowledge on plants and learning about another area of Johnsons.

    3)What have the challenges been so far?

    Learning and remembering all the new information on how to do quotes.

    4)What did you do prior to working at Johnsons?

    I was at University studying Geography and then I worked at Beningbrough Hall in the café.

    5)What do you like most about working at Johnsons?

    The people, the variety of things you can do and of course the food days.

    6)Favourite TV series?

    Top Gear.

    7)Favourite food?

    Spaghetti Bolognese.

    8)Tell us something we don’t know about you:

    I worked as a stable groom when I was a teenager.

    General Amenity Sales Manager, Vicky Newell said: “ Sarah has joined our team and has fit in seamlessly. She has been a real asset to our team and has been able to impart her vast knowledge of SAP to the rest of the sales team too.  “

    Posted 2nd Feb 12:51pm
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  74. Brexit, a year on at Johnsons of Whixley

    Brexit, a year on at Johnsons of Whixley

    At the start of every new year, we often reflect on the previous year, this is no different for us as the company reflects on the impact that Brexit has had on business and many others in the horticultural industry.

    Supplying 5-6 million plants to the commercial sector, garden centres and landscape affiliated trades each year it is estimated that we have supplied 230 million plants throughout the UK.

    2021 brought to us many challenges, trials and tribulations, the bureaucratic burden has come at a price with reduced revenue, increased cost and a slower supply chain. Brexit has impacted every element of the business and continues to do so with transport, compliance, incoming goods, accounts, recruitment and even our IT function working hard to mitigate the impact.

    Post-Brexit, UK horticulture, which contributes over £24 billion to the economy, has become one of the most regulated industries in the UK. Johnsons brought in 462 loads from the EU in 2021 and it cost the company £210,000 more than it did in 2020 due to Brexit-related bureaucracy.

    The inevitable consequence of the imposition of the requirement for a phytosanitary certificate accompanying every consignment was highlighted well before the UK left the EU. Post-Brexit, Johnsons are dealing with fewer suppliers and more product is coming to them through traders, therefore exposing them to an increased biosecurity risk.

    One of the opportunities to come out of the EU exit is the UK’s ability to control biosecurity and look after the health of our plants with nurseries and garden centres playing a key role in policing what is coming in and from whom.

    Jonathan Whittemore, head of production and procurement at Johnsons of Whixley commented: “

    Of the costs mentioned above, £150,000 relates to EU plant health – this is money Johnsons is spending in the EU, with EU companies and authorities, on inspections and Phytosanitary certificates. The EU Phytosanitary certificate is a perfect example of the costly bureaucracy that doesn’t achieve its aim.

    Whilst requiring a Phytosanitary certificate to accompany plants coming from the EU, APHA doesn’t give the Phytosanitary certificate any authority. To give but one example, plants due to be collected by Johnsons in Belgium, which were exhibiting symptoms of a suspected disease, were held in Belgium until the plants could be tested. The plants were passed as fit to travel and issued a Phytosanitary certificate. On arrival in the UK, the plants were inspected by UK plant health, seen to be exhibiting symptoms for the suspected disease, but despite having a certificate confirming a negative result AND a phytosanitary certificate issued by the Belgium plant health authorities APHA sent the plants for testing. The plants were quarantined until the negative result came back.

    What is the point of the time taken and the cost borne (by UK businesses) of testing and issuing a Phytosanitary certificate in the EU?”

    Jonathan continues: “ A robust stance is critical in disease control matters, and UK Horticulture should be pleased that this is the approach APHA is taking. But if we are not going to put any credence on the inspections and testing done in the EU then let’s not ask for it to be done, and let’s not pay for it. It is the single biggest barrier to the industry in terms of both timescale and cost, and as already stated, this is money being spent in the EU, not the UK – this is a double hit – expense to UK businesses that could be reinvested in production to help the UK meet its environmental goals, and less money coming into UK authorities that could be spent on things like the NHS.

    We should continue with the inspections and testing by APHA in the UK but instead of insisting on the issuing of a phytosanitary certificate in the EU, recognising the EU processes and Plant Passporting regimes, the same ones we ourselves were part of in 2020, would be a massive move in terms of mitigating UK businesses’ exposure to cost. The cash freed up would allow a focus on investing in our businesses and helping to achieve the Government’s aims of a stronger, more UK- sufficient horticultural supply chain.”

     

    Posted 12th Jan 9:38am
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  75. February Gardening Reminders 2022

    February Gardening Reminders 2022

    Winter is on the way out this month as the first signs of spring start to appear, with bulbs such as snowdrops starting to emerge. There’s plenty to be doing this month in the garden, from planting to final winter pruning and cleaning out the bird boxes for #BirdFeedingMonth. Check out our hints and tips put together by our chairman and Horticulturist, John Richardson below.

    Plant container-grown perennials for an early start to the spring. If large plants, consider carefully dividing them before planting; we all enjoy getting a bit extra at no cost !!

    Be sure to water root-balls before planting. If there is a dry spring, it may significantly slow growth.

    Apply a mulch of garden compost, mushroom compost etc., to all trees and shrubs in potentially dry sites. No need to incorporate it into the soil; worms will do it for you! Don’t apply mushroom compost, which has a high lime content, to acid-loving plants such as Azaleas & Rhododendrons.

    Finish winter pruning this month. First-principles are to remove dead and diseased stems, then cross branches, followed by a reduction in the height of the main stems in the case of roses.

    Cut bushy Eucalyptus back to within 2-3″ of the main stem to stimulate a flush of bushy growth.

    Examine stored Dahlia tubers and place them in a tub of tepid water overnight if they have shrivelled. Cutaway diseased areas of the tubers that have rotted and dust the cuts with flowers of sulphur.

    Do not apply heavy dressings of fertilizer to areas of naturalized bulbs as this will only encourage the growth of the surrounding grass.

    Prune shrub roses in late February to encourage growth from the base. Remove some of the old weedy shoots but don’t reduce height too much as they tend to flower on older wood.

    Divide and replant Snowdrops ‘in the green’ as the flowers go over.

    Take hardwood cuttings of forsythia, deutzia, honeysuckle, jasmine, Virginia creeper, holly, privet, cotoneaster, poplar, willow, gooseberries, blackcurrants etc. and heel-in, in a protected area.

    When the ground is firm, repair any uneven areas of the lawn or where the grass has died out.

    Pot up or transplant last year’s rooted hardwood cuttings.

    If the weather warms up, take the opportunity to prepare compost and boxes for sowing half-hardy annuals by the end of the month. You should have a heat source available for cold nights.

    Cut back Clematis Jackmanii and C. Viticella groups to about 12″. Pyracantha should be pruned to within 2 buds of the mainframe except for extensions, if not done last autumn.

    Put a suitable number of chitted potatoes into a good-sized plastic pot and cover with 20cm of compost. Water as appropriate and continue to add compost as foliage growth continues. Leave to mature and water frequently. Harvest the potatoes when foliage begins to die back.

    Clean out and sterilize existing bird nesting boxes and erect new ones. Feed the birds!

    Propagate a wide range of woody shrubs by layering, towards the end of the month. Peg down a young shoot into the soil under the shrub/tree without detaching it from the tree, but make a cut in the underneath of the stem, or twist it at the point where it will turn it upwards. Pin this down with a suitable forked twig into a couple of handfuls of compost water, and hold firm with a suitable stone. Tie the growing shoot to a small cane to keep it upright and trim to prevent moving in the wind.

    Posted 2nd Feb 11:59am
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  76. March Gardening Reminders 2022

    March Gardening Reminders 2022

    Winter is on the way out this month as the first signs of spring start to appear, with bulbs such as snowdrops starting to emerge. There’s plenty to be doing this month in the garden, from planting to final winter pruning and cleaning out the bird boxes for #BirdFeedingMonth. Check out our hints and tips put together by our chairman and Horticulturist, John Richardson below.

    Make sure the roses are pruned by the end of the month, hard pruning promotes growth, and will benefit any weaker growing plants or varieties. Ensure that you cut back to white healthy wood.

    Sow seed of bedding dahlias at a temp. of 64 deg.F and prick off seedlings into boxes or pots. Take cuttings from tubers started into growth in February when rooted (3-4 weeks) pot them individually into 8-9 cm pots.

    By the end of the month ensure that pruning of all woody trees and shrubs has been completed, remembering that plants that flower early, such as forsythia and weigela, should not be pruned until after flowering. Prune Buddleia and Perovskia late in the month to prevent frost damage.

    For trees and shrubs being purchased late in the planting season, it may well be more successful to purchase root balled or container-grown plants to prevent drying out in a dry and windy month, alternatively, establish a watering system that can water the root systems morning and evening.

    Complete the planting of new hedges, remembering that plants will require watering whenever conditions are getting dry. Hedge plants are often sold ‘bare root’ which can dry out quickly.

    If you did not take heather cuttings last year, you can produce extra plants by layering in late March when the weather is suitable. In a shallow trench beneath the plant, refill the hollow with a compost and grit mixture and peg down the shoot with a suitable stone or peg. Leave shoot tips visible. It may be up to a year before transplanting is possible, but plants should be strong and well-rooted by then.

    Late March is the best time to move snowdrops in spite of the foliage remaining green as well as the odd flower. They should soon recover when watered.

    When indoor flower bulbs are finished, do not remove the leaves as photosynthesis continues to provide nutrition until leaves turn yellow. This helps build up the bulb for the following year.

    Give increased ventilation and more frequent watering to alpine plants in sunny conditions. Leave glasshouse doors open on mild days.

    Read a manual on the annual pruning and care of fruit trees as their requirements relating to tree age and species vary considerably.

    For most fruits, the danger of damage to young shoots occurs in early April to mid-May. We have had a few cold spells this winter and spring, and growth may be advanced compared with most years. In the event of severe frost warnings, cover strawberries and other early fruiting plants overnight with hessian or thick polythene, but ensure it is removed during the day. Wall trained fruit trees may require to be protected from early March as buds break early under the protection of the wall.

    Mow the lawn for the first time this season with the blades set higher than normal to prevent hitting worm casts. Choose a day for the first cut when the grass is dry and the weather is mild. If worm casts are very numerous it may be necessary to spray the lawn with worm killer such as Chlordane. Brushing the lawn horizontally with a besom brush will make a good job and prevent the need for chemicals.

     

    Posted 3rd Mar 3:11pm
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  77. January Gardening Reminders 2022

    January Gardening Reminders 2022

    Why not start your New Year in the garden? January is a great month to plan what needs to be done during the month and beyond, be sure to remember the birds this month as the temperatures drop and have your shears at the ready for pruning and tidying. Below are some January hints and tips put together by our Chairman and Horticulturist John Richardson.

    1) Bring inside bowls of bulbs as they show signs of growth.

    2)  Store shrubs arriving from nurseries in a frost-free shed with straw around the roots. Complete the planting as soon as conditions improve.

    3) Keep house plant warm (45-55deg.) with plenty of light. Do not feed until the plants start growing strongly.

    4) Annual surface growing weeds on light soils should be removed or buried at whatever stage of growth.

    5) Order new Gladioli corms. Unpack them on arrival into shallow boxes and check for disease. Young, high-necked corms with a small root base are better than old corms with a larger flatter root zone.

    6) Remove any recently fallen foliage from around alpines and lightly break up the soil.

    7) Continue pruning fruit trees and bushes; collect and burn the wastage once done.

    8) Treat wooden objects such as tree stakes, wooden wheelbarrows, benching supports etc., but do not use creosote as the chemical and even the fumes can cause harm if in close contact with plants.

    9)  Place a couple of forks of well-rotted manure on top of a mature rhubarb crown to produce an early crop of stems. Or do even better place an upturned dustbin or similar over the whole crown to produce those beautiful red and yellow stems we see in the greengrocers during the Spring.

    10) If the grass needs to be cut due to very mild weather, remove the grass mowings, as it is will be too cold for decomposition.

    11) If you want to make an early start to the gardening year, cover some areas with polythene or cloches to protect the soil from the hardest frost and the heavy spring rain. This can increase soil temperatures by up to 6 degrees.

    12) Have a walk around the garden with some paper and a pencil to identify those spots which need other plants, or just a change of species.  Have a look from the house window, identify the gaps, and plan for the year what you wish to change.

    13) If very hard frosts are anticipated, wrap tender plants such Agapanthus with straw or bubble-wrap and tie securely.

    14) Do you have enough winter colour? Plant willow and Cornus etc., together with coloured conifers and winter aconites for a brighter winter garden.

    15) Clean out all rainwater gutters from garden-related spouts and down-pipes to prevent blockages in Spring.

    16) Keep bird baths topped up and make sure they are not iced over. Also, keep food stores topped up for them.

    In need of more hints and tips? head to our solution page here

    Posted 21st Dec 2:24pm
    Read more >

  78. The Growers Plantspo - Plants for December Interest

    The Growers Plantspo - Plants for December Interest

    We typically think of Holly varieties when we think of December, but there are plenty of interesting plants, including Skimmias, Cornus and Helleborus. Check out some of our favourite December varieties below:

    Cornus varieties such as ‘Midwinter Fire’, and ‘Sibrica’ 

    Cornus are known for their coloured stems that are revealed when their leaves fall. Shades of red, yellow and orange stems are available.

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 3m (depending on the variety)

    ???? Width: Up to 2m (depending on the variety)

    Soil:  moderately fertile soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L,  10L ( subject to availability and the variety)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Sarcococca confusa

    ???? Position: Partial – deep shade

    ????Flowers: December – March

    ???? Height: Up to 2m (depending on the variety)

    ???? Width: Up to 1m (depending on the variety)

    Soil:  fertile, humus-rich, moist, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3LD, 5L,  10L  ( subject to availability and the variety)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Skimmia varieties such as ‘Rubella’ and ‘Kew Green’

    ????Flowers:  April – May (depending on variety) flower buds are seen in autumn-winter.

    ???? Position: Partial – full shade

    ???? Height: Up to 1.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist-well-drained, acid soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Viburnum varieties such as ‘tinus’ and ‘bod Dawn’

    ????Flowers:  December – April

    ???? Position: Full sun or partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 3m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist-well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Mahonia varieties such as ‘Charity’ and ‘Winter Sun’

    Are the perfect addition to a shaded spot in your garden as they prefer full – partial shade with spikes of yellow flowers from November through to March that has a fragrant reminiscent of lily-of-the-valley on dark green holly-like leaves. Prune in spring after flowering.

    ????Flowers:  November – March (depending on variety)

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist-well-drained, fertile, humus-rich soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L, 20L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Helleborus varieties 

    Hellebores are compact, clump-forming perennials with dark green, leathery leaves and stunning flowers.

    A tremendous shade-loving border plant that will brighten up your garden when little else is flowering from December – March.

    ???? Flowers: December – March (depending on the variety)

    ????Position: Partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 45cn (depending on the variety)

    Soil: Heavy, neutral to alkaline soil

    It would help if you planted in partial to full shade for best results and cut back old leaves in January – February to show off new flowers.

    ———————————————————————————————

    Ilex varieties 

    ????Position: Full sun – Partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 20m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist-well-drained, fertile, humus-rich soil

    ———————————————————————————————

     

    Posted 20th Dec 1:26pm
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  79. The Growers Plantspo - Plants for February

    The Growers Plantspo - Plants for February

    Theirs plenty of interest in the plant world in February as the first signs of spring start to emerge with snowdrops popping up and plants in bud, here are some of our favourite February varieties below:

    Camellia varieties in bud

    Some of our Camellia plants are in full bud right now (start of February) this plant makes a great addition to a partially shaded border or large pot with luscious green foliage and flowers available in shades of pink, red and white.

    ????Flowers: February – April (depending on the variety)

    ???? Position: Partial shade (not east-facing)

    ???? Height: Up to4m + (depending on the variety)

    ???? Width: Up to 2.5m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: moist but well-drained, humus-rich, acid soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 7.5L, 10L, 20L + ( subject to availability and the variety)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Cornus varieties such as ‘Midwinter Fire’, and ‘Sibrica’ 

    Cornus are known for their coloured stems that are revealed when their leaves fall. Shades of red, yellow and orange stems are available.

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 3m (depending on the variety)

    ???? Width: Up to 2m (depending on the variety)

    Soil:  moderately fertile soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L,  10L ( subject to availability and the variety)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Sarcococca confusa

    Highly scented white flowers sit above large glossy, rich green leaves come late winter – early spring. It is a great addition to a shady border or a shaded patio spot where you can smell it every day.

    ???? Position: Partial – deep shade

    ????Flowers: December – March

    ???? Height: Up to 2m (depending on the variety)

    ???? Width: Up to 1m (depending on the variety)

    Soil:  fertile, humus-rich, moist, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3LD, 5L,  10L  ( subject to availability and the variety)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Salix varieties with catkins such as ‘Mount Aso’

    Fuzzy pink catkins appear on varieties such as ‘Mount Aso’ during late winter – early spring, a wonderful eye-catching addition to the garden.

    ???? Position: Full sun

    ????Flowers: April – May

    ???? Height: Up to 4m (depending on the variety)

    ???? Width: Up to 3m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: Moist but well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3LD, 5L,  10L  ( subject to availability and the variety)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Skimmia varieties such as ‘Rubella’ and ‘Kew Green’

    Are you in need of some autumn/winter colour? Skimmia Rubella are known for their dark red flower buds that are produced in autumn and last through to winter until the flowers open in spring — an excellent plant for a patio pot or border.

    ????Flowers:  April – May (depending on variety) flower buds are seen in autumn-winter.

    ???? Position: Partial – full shade

    ???? Height: Up to 1.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist-well-drained, acid soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Viburnum varieties such as ‘tinus’ and ‘bod Dawn’

    Evergreen Viburnums such as tinus are a great shrub for winter interest with dark green leaves and clusters of tiny white flowers from December to April.

    A great low maintenance, easy to grow shrub that can brighten a part shaded area of the garden when little else is flowering.

    ????Flowers:  December – April

    ???? Position: Full sun or partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 3m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist-well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Magnolia varieties in bud

    Another sign that spring is on its way… Magnolias in bud, these varieties generally flower from March-April onwards but some may appear towards the end of February.

    ????Flowers:  March – April onwards

    ???? Position: Full sun or partial shade (depending on the variety)

    ???? Height: Up to 10m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist-well-drained, acidic soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Mahonia varieties such as ‘Charity’ and ‘Winter Sun’

    Are the perfect addition to a shaded spot in your garden as they prefer full – partial shade with spikes of yellow flowers from November through to March that has a fragrant reminiscent of lily-of-the-valley on dark green holly-like leaves. Prune in spring after flowering.

    ????Flowers:  November – March (depending on variety)

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist-well-drained, fertile, humus-rich soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L, 20L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Hamamelis varieties

    Hamamelis plants are covered in branches of distinctive, spider-like, fragrant flowers in red, yellow, and orange shades from January to early spring.

    Whilst slow growing this plant variety can become a large spreading shrub or small tree. A fantastic specimen plant that will make a great addition to the middle or back of a border.

    Plant in well-drained, neutral acid soil in full sun to partial shade for best results.

    ????Flowers: January – February

    ☀️ Position: Full sun – Partial shade

    Pot size: 5L, 10L, 20L + (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Helleborus varieties 

    Hellebores are compact, clump-forming perennials with dark green, leathery leaves and stunning flowers.

    A tremendous shade-loving border plant that will brighten up your garden when little else is flowering from December – March.

    ???? Flowers: December – March (depending on the variety)

    ????Position: Partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 45cn (depending on the variety)

    Soil: Heavy, neutral to alkaline soil

     

    It would help if you planted in partial to full shade for best results and cut back old leaves in January – February to show off new flowers.

    ———————————————————————————————

    Jasminum nudiflorum

    A deciduous climber with bright yellow flowers that appear on bare stems in winter and early spring helping to brighten up a dark winter’s day. This attractive climber will grow well against a trellis or low wall once trained as it is not self-clinging.

    ????Flowers: January – March

    ☀️ Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 3m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist-well-drained soil

     Pot size:  2LD, 3LD  ( subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Nandina varieties such as ‘domestica’ and ‘Fire Power’ 

    Nandinas provide autumn- winter interest when leaves turn shades of fiery red and copper.

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ????Flowers:  July  (depending on variety)

    ???? Height: Up to 2m (depending on the variety)

    ???? Width: Up to 1.5m (depending on the variety)

    Soil:  moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 5L, 10L, 20L, 25L +

    ———————————————————————————————

    Pieris varieties in bud

    Pieris plants generally flower from March-May but buds start to appear as pictured in February. Ideal for a partially shaded shrub border with flowers resembling lily-of-the-valley and available in shades of pink, red and white.

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ????Flowers:  March-May  (depending on variety)

    ???? Height: Up to 2.5m (depending on the variety)

    ???? Width: Up to 2m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: humus-rich, moist, well-drained acid soil or ericaceous compost

     Pot size: 2l, 3L, 5L, 7.5L, 10L, 20L (depending on the variety and availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Click here for more monthly plantspo

    Posted 3rd Feb 10:46am
    Read more >

  80. The Growers Plantspo - Plants for March Interest

    The Growers Plantspo - Plants for March Interest

    March sees us cross over from winter to spring, with spring bringing with it many more flowering varieties from Bergenia to Vincas providing exciting spring colour as we see bees starting to emerge and birds making a return from migration. Check out some of our favourite March flowering varieties below

    Bergenia varieties such as ‘Silberlicht’ and cordifolia ‘Purpurea’

    Bergenia’s large leathery leaves make attractive ground cover, while its flowers provide an early source of pollen for bees and other pollinating insects.

    ????Flowers: March – April

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 0.6m depending on the variety

     Soil: Any soil type

     Pot size: 2L, 3L  (subject to availability and the variety)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Chaenomeles varieties such as ‘Jet Trail, ‘Crimson & Gold’ & ‘Nivalis’

    A great addition to a wall or fence in the sun or partial shade-providing colour in early spring when little else is flowering. Flowers are available in pink, red and white.

    ????Flowers: March – May

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 2.5m

     Soil: Moderately fertile, moist but well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 3LD, 5L (subject to availability and the variety)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Camellia varieties

    Some of our Camellia plants are in full bud right now (start of February) this plant makes a great addition to a partially shaded border or large pot with luscious green foliage and flowers available in shades of pink, red and white.

    ????Flowers: February – April (depending on the variety)

    ???? Position: Partial shade (not east-facing)

    ???? Height: Up to4m + (depending on the variety)

    ???? Width: Up to 2.5m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: moist but well-drained, humus-rich, acid soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 7.5L, 10L, 20L + ( subject to availability and the variety)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Cornus varieties such as ‘Midwinter Fire’, and ‘Sibrica’ 

    Cornus are known for their coloured stems that are revealed when their leaves fall. Shades of red, yellow and orange stems are available.

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 3m (depending on the variety)

    ???? Width: Up to 2m (depending on the variety)

    Soil:  moderately fertile soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L,  10L ( subject to availability and the variety)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Corylopsis pauciflora

    Sweetly scented yellow flowers appear on bare stems during March and April gollowed by bronzed, hazel like leaves which mature to bright green.

    ????Flowers: March – April

    ???? Position: Ppartial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 1.5m (depending on the variety)

    ???? Width: Up to 2.5m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist, well drained ,acid soil

    Pot size: 10L, 20L ( subject to availability and the variety)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Erysimum ‘Bowles’s mauve’

    A long-flowering semi-evergreen with narrow, grey-green leaves. This perennial produces spikes of purple flowers from late February to July and will make a great addition to a long flowering sunny border.

    ???? Flowers: February – July

    ☀️ Position: Full sun

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained, neutral soil

    Pot size: Available in 2L pots subject to availability.

    ———————————————————————————————

    Euphorbia wulfenii

    Is filled with huge heads of yellow-green flowers with ‘bronze eyes’ from late March-May that tower above its bluish-green foliage. Great at the back of a sunny border.

    Available in 2L pots subject to availability.

    ????Flowers:  Late March-May

    ☀️ Position:  Full sun

    ———————————————————————————————

    Forsythia ‘Lynwood Gold’ 

    Yellow flowers smother branches from March – April providing a notable cheery sight to the start of spring. Try planting at the back of a dull border or even as a hedge with its full height reaching 2 meters.

    ????Flowers:  February to April

    ☀️ Position:  Full sun or light shade

    Soil: Fertile, moist, well-drained, neutral soil

    Pot size: Available in 2L  and 3L pots subject to availability.

    ———————————————————————————————

    Helleborus varieties 

    Hellebores are compact, clump-forming perennials with dark green, leathery leaves and stunning flowers.

    A tremendous shade-loving border plant that will brighten up your garden when little else is flowering from December – March.

    ???? Flowers: December – March (depending on the variety)

    ????Position: Partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 45cn (depending on the variety)

    Soil: Heavy, neutral to alkaline soil

    2L, 3L

    It would help if you planted in partial to full shade for best results and cut back old leaves in January – February to show off new flowers.

    ———————————————————————————————

    Jasminum nudiflorum

    A deciduous climber with bright yellow flowers that appear on bare stems in winter and early spring helping to brighten up a dark winter’s day. This attractive climber will grow well against a trellis or low wall once trained as it is not self-clinging.

    ????Flowers: January – March

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 3m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist-well-drained soil

    Pot size:  2LD, 3LD  ( subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Kerria japonica ‘Pleniflora’

    A great addition to the garden, brighting up a dark corner, with double yellow flowers that burst from mid-late spring.

    ????Flowers: March-May

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 2m

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Prunus Kojo-no-Mai

    A pretty deciduous shrub with zig-zag branches and crimson buds that open to display white flowers with pink centres in early spring. Its luscious green leaves appear after the summer months and are then followed by bright reddish/orange leaves before falling in the Autumn. A perfect small compact tree for a smaller garden or patio pot.

    ????Flowers: March-April

    ???? Position: Full sun

    ???? Height: Up to 2m

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Magnolia x soulangeana and the variety ‘Susan’

    Another sign that spring is on its way… Magnolias in bud, these varieties generally flower from March-April onwards but some may appear towards the end of February.

    ????Flowers:  March – April onwards

    ???? Position: Full sun or partial shade (depending on the variety)

    ???? Height: Up to 10m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist-well-drained, acidic soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Mahonia varieties such as ‘Charity’ and ‘Winter Sun’

    Are the perfect addition to a shaded spot in your garden as they prefer full – partial shade with spikes of yellow flowers from November through to March that has a fragrant reminiscent of lily-of-the-valley on dark green holly-like leaves. Prune in spring after flowering.

    ????Flowers:  November – March (depending on variety)

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist-well-drained, fertile, humus-rich soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L, 20L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Pieris varieties such as ‘Passion’

    Pieris plants generally flower from March-May but buds start to appear in February. Ideal for a partially shaded shrub border with flowers resembling lily-of-the-valley and available in shades of pink, red and white.

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ????Flowers:  March-May  (depending on variety)

    ???? Height: Up to 2.5m (depending on the variety)

    ???? Width: Up to 2m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: humus-rich, moist, well-drained acid soil or ericaceous compost

     Pot size: 2l, 3L, 5L, 7.5L, 10L, 20L (depending on the variety and availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Sarcococca confusa

    Highly scented white flowers sit above large glossy, rich green leaves come late winter – early spring. It is a great addition to a shady border or a shaded patio spot where you can smell it every day.

    ???? Position: Partial – deep shade

    ????Flowers: December – March

    ???? Height: Up to 2m (depending on the variety)

    ???? Width: Up to 1m (depending on the variety)

    Soil:  fertile, humus-rich, moist, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3LD, 5L,  10L  ( subject to availability and the variety)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Salix varieties with catkins such as ‘Mount Aso’

    Fuzzy pink catkins appear on varieties such as ‘Mount Aso’ during late winter – early spring, a wonderful eye-catching addition to the garden.

    ???? Position: Full sun

    ????Flowers: April – May

    ???? Height: Up to 4m (depending on the variety)

    ???? Width: Up to 3m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: Moist but well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3LD, 5L,  10L  ( subject to availability and the variety)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Skimmia varieties such as ‘Rubella’ and ‘Kew Green’

    Are you in need of some autumn/winter colour? Skimmia Rubella are known for their dark red flower buds that are produced in autumn and last through to winter until the flowers open in spring — an excellent plant for a patio pot or border.

    ????Flowers:  End of March – May (depending on variety and whether its a male or female cultivar) flower buds are seen in autumn-winter.

    ???? Position: Partial – full shade

    ???? Height: Up to 1.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist-well-drained, acid soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Viburnum varieties such as ‘tinus’ and ‘bod Dawn’

    Evergreen Viburnums such as tinus are a great shrub for winter interest with dark green leaves and clusters of tiny white flowers from December to April.

    A great low maintenance, easy to grow shrub that can brighten a part shaded area of the garden when little else is flowering.

    ????Flowers:  December – April

    ???? Position: Full sun or partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 3m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist-well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Vinca varieties such as ‘major’, minor’ and ‘atropurpurea’ 

    A great low growing ground cover plant with pale blue flowers and lance-shaped dark green leaves. It is excellent at suppressing weeds and would make a great addition to the front of a border. It generally flowers from April – September.

    ????Flowers: End of March- April – September

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 0.45m depending on the variety

    Soil: any but very dry soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    Click here for more monthly plantspo

    Posted 22nd Feb 9:40am
    Read more >

  81. The Growers Plantspo - Plants for April Interest

    The Growers Plantspo - Plants for April Interest

    April sees the garden starting to wake up, as more shrubs and herbaceous plants start to bloom including some Clematis. Pieris, Spirea and Brunnera varieties. Check out some of our favourite April flowering varieties below

    Amelanchier lamarckii

    Delicate star-shaped flowers appear in spring against bronze leaves that mature to dark green with great autumn interest.

    ????Flowers: March – April

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 10m depending on the variety

     Soil: fertile, moist but well-drained neutral to acid soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L,12L +  (subject to availability and the variety)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Bergenia varieties such as ‘Silberlicht’ and cordifolia ‘Purpurea’

    Bergenia’s large leathery leaves make attractive ground cover, while its flowers provide an early source of pollen for bees and other pollinating insects.

    ????Flowers: March – April

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 0.6m depending on the variety

     Soil: Any soil type

     Pot size: 2L, 3L  (subject to availability and the variety)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Brunnera varieties such as macrophylla ‘Jack Frost’

    Tiny blue forget-me-not flowers appear against heart-shaped silver dusted leaves in spring. A beautiful groundcover plant for a shaded border.

    ????Flowers: April – May

    ???? Position: Partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 0.4m depending on the variety

     Soil: Fertile, humus-rich, moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L  (subject to availability and the variety)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Chaenomeles varieties such as ‘Jet Trail, ‘Crimson & Gold’ & ‘Nivalis’

    A great addition to a wall or fence in the sun or partial shade-providing colour in early spring when little else is flowering. Flowers are available in pink, red and white.

    ????Flowers: March – May

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 2.5m

     Soil: Moderately fertile, moist but well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 3LD, 5L (subject to availability and the variety)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Camellia varieties

    Some of our Camellia plants are in full bud right now (start of February) this plant makes a great addition to a partially shaded border or large pot with luscious green foliage and flowers available in shades of pink, red and white.

    ????Flowers: February – April (depending on the variety)

    ???? Position: Partial shade (not east-facing)

    ???? Height: Up to4m + (depending on the variety)

    ???? Width: Up to 2.5m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: moist but well-drained, humus-rich, acid soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 7.5L, 10L, 20L + ( subject to availability and the variety)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Clematis varieties such as ‘early sensation’

    ????Flowers: March – April

    ???? Position: Full sun –  Partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 2m (depending on the variety)

    ???? Width: Up to 2m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well drained soil

    Pot size: 10L, 20L ( subject to availability and the variety)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Corylopsis pauciflora

    Sweetly scented yellow flowers appear on bare stems during March and April gollowed by bronzed, hazel like leaves which mature to bright green.

    ????Flowers: March – April

    ???? Position: Partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 1,5m (depending on the variety)

    ???? Width: Up to 1.5m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist, well drained ,acid soil

    Pot size: 10L, 20L ( subject to availability and the variety)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Choisya varieties such as ‘Aztec Pearl’, ‘Sundance’ & ‘White Dazzler’

    ????Flowers: April – May (often have a second flush in summer)

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 2.5m

     Soil: Moderately fertile,well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L (subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Deutzia varieties like ‘Mont Rose’ and ‘Rosea’

    ????Flowers: April – June

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 1m

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Dicentra varieties such as ‘Bleeding Heart’

    Heart-shaped flowers appear in spring above fern-like green leaves. Great in a shady border or as part of a cottage garden planting plan.

    ????Flowers:  April – May

    ☀️ Position:  Full sun or partial shade

    Soil: Moist, humus-rich, preferably neutral to slightly alkaline

    Pot size: Available in 2L  and 3L pots subject to availability.

    ———————————————————————————————

    Erysimum ‘Bowles’s mauve’

    A long-flowering semi-evergreen with narrow, grey-green leaves. This perennial produces spikes of purple flowers from late February to July and will make a great addition to a long flowering sunny border.

    ???? Flowers: February – July

    ☀️ Position: Full sun

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained, neutral soil

    Pot size: Available in 2L pots subject to availability.

    ———————————————————————————————

    Euphorbia wulfenii

    Is filled with huge heads of yellow-green flowers with ‘bronze eyes’ from late March-May that tower above its bluish-green foliage. Great at the back of a sunny border.

    Available in 2L pots subject to availability.

    ????Flowers:  Late March-May

    ☀️ Position:  Full sun

    ———————————————————————————————

    Exochorda x macrantha varieties such as ‘The Bride’ & ‘Niagara’

    ????Flowers: April – May

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 2m

    Soil: Moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 5L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Forsythia ‘Lynwood Gold’ 

    Yellow flowers smother branches from March – April providing a notable cheery sight to the start of spring. Try planting at the back of a dull border or even as a hedge with its full height reaching 2 meters.

    ????Flowers:  February to April

    ☀️ Position:  Full sun or light shade

    Soil: Fertile, moist, well-drained, neutral soil

    Pot size: Available in 2L  and 3L pots subject to availability.

    ———————————————————————————————

    Kerria japonica ‘Pleniflora’

    A great addition to the garden, brighting up a dark corner, with double yellow flowers that burst from mid-late spring.

    ????Flowers: March-May

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 2m

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Osmanthus x burkwoodii & delavayi

    ????Flowers: April-May

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 3m

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L3L, 5L 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Prunus Kojo-no-Mai

    A pretty deciduous shrub with zig-zag branches and crimson buds that open to display white flowers with pink centres in early spring. Its luscious green leaves appear after the summer months and are then followed by bright reddish/orange leaves before falling in the Autumn. A perfect small compact tree for a smaller garden or patio pot.

    ????Flowers: March-April

    ???? Position: Full sun

    ???? Height: Up to 2m

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Magnolia x soulangeana and the variety ‘Susan’

    Another sign that spring is on its way… Magnolias in bud, these varieties generally flower from March-April onwards but some may appear towards the end of February.

    ????Flowers:  March – April onwards

    ???? Position: Full sun or partial shade (depending on the variety)

    ???? Height: Up to 10m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist-well-drained, acidic soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Pieris varieties such as ‘Passion’

    Pieris plants generally flower from March-May but buds start to appear in February. Ideal for a partially shaded shrub border with flowers resembling lily-of-the-valley and available in shades of pink, red and white.

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ????Flowers:  March-May  (depending on variety)

    ???? Height: Up to 2.5m (depending on the variety)

    ???? Width: Up to 2m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: humus-rich, moist, well-drained acid soil or ericaceous compost

     Pot size: 2l, 3L, 5L, 7.5L, 10L, 20L (depending on the variety and availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Ribes sanguineum varieties such as ‘King Edward’, ‘Pulborough Scarlet’

    ????Flowers:  April – May

    ???? Position: Full sun

    ???? Height: Up to 3m depending on the variety

    Soil: Moderately fertile, moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 2LD, 3L, 3LD, 5L, 10L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Salix varieties with catkins such as ‘Mount Aso’

    Fuzzy pink catkins appear on varieties such as ‘Mount Aso’ during late winter – early spring, a wonderful eye-catching addition to the garden.

    ???? Position: Full sun

    ????Flowers: April – May

    ???? Height: Up to 4m (depending on the variety)

    ???? Width: Up to 3m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: Moist but well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3LD, 5L,  10L  ( subject to availability and the variety)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Skimmia varieties such as ‘Rubella’ and ‘Kew Green’

    Are you in need of some autumn/winter colour? Skimmia Rubella are known for their dark red flower buds that are produced in autumn and last through to winter until the flowers open in spring — an excellent plant for a patio pot or border.

    ????Flowers:  End of March – May (depending on variety and whether its a male or female cultivar) flower buds are seen in autumn-winter.

    ???? Position: Partial – full shade

    ???? Height: Up to 1.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist-well-drained, acid soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Viburnum varieties such as ‘tinus’ and ‘bod Dawn’

    Evergreen Viburnums such as tinus are a great shrub for winter interest with dark green leaves and clusters of tiny white flowers from December to April.

    A great low maintenance, easy to grow shrub that can brighten a part shaded area of the garden when little else is flowering.

    ????Flowers:  December – April

    ???? Position: Full sun or partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 3m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist-well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Vinca varieties such as ‘major’, minor’ and ‘atropurpurea’ 

    A great low growing ground cover plant with pale blue flowers and lance-shaped dark green leaves. It is excellent at suppressing weeds and would make a great addition to the front of a border. It generally flowers from April – September.

    ????Flowers: End of March- April – September

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 0.45m depending on the variety

    Soil: any but very dry soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    Click here for more monthly plantspo

    Posted 11th Apr 1:00pm
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  82. Cycle to work and burn calories

    Cycle to work and burn calories

    Head of Production and Procurement, Jonathan Whittemore, will have achieved a whopping 10,000 miles + on his bike this year with an average of 18MPH, meaning he will have burned over 350,000 calories cycling. That’s the same as eating 9,344 burgers saving 356352 c02 emissions from not driving.

    Are you interested in joining the Cycle to Work Scheme? Cyclescheme is an employee benefit that saves you 25-39% on a new bike and accessories. You pay nothing upfront. Basically, the company buys the bike, and you pay the money back each month through a salary sacrifice, which means you save on tax. Over 2,000 retailers are working with Cyclesheme nationally, and it is available in most bike shops locally, although we would recommend York Cycle Works in York or Chevin Cycles in Harrogate. It is a great scheme, and if you need any more information, you can go onto the Cyclescheme website https://www.cyclescheme.co.uk/help/faqs/how-does-it-work.

    Posted 20th Dec 9:27am
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  83. The Employee Awards 2021 Winners

    The Employee Awards 2021 Winners

    Earlier this year, we asked staff to vote for their colleagues for our ‘Employee Awards’. The winners and runners-up were announced at the Christmas party at the end of last month with 13 award categories, including ‘The Neatest Nook’, ‘The Always Hungry’ and ‘The Biggest Smile Award’ below are this year’s winners. 

    EMPLOYEE OF THE YEAR AWARD

    Winner: Terry Cooper

    Runner-up: Tony Green

    Our System Support Assistant, Terry Cooper, scooped up the ‘Employee of The Year Award‘ with the majority vote. Terry is always on hand to help with IT issues that arise and supports our IT Manager, Darren Earle. He helps with regular upgrades, producing reports, has been fundamental in automating many of our processes and is someone who quietly listens to the problems being presented, working up a solution where he can.

    THE BRIGHT BEGINNER AWARD

    Winner: Isaac Onions

    Runner-up: Tom Chilton

    Isaac joined us via the agency in 2019, working outside on the Plant Centre and was taken on full time a year ago and most recently started working in sales, he is doing a great job and has a bright future ahead of him, well done Isaac.

    NEVER KNOWS WHEN TO GO HOME AWARD

     

    Winner: Adrian Price and Tony Green

    Runner-up: Rob Richardson

    We’d say well done, but I think this award requires more of a thank you, thank you for staying when you are required to do so and even when you are not. Thank you for going above and beyond each working day. We hope the nightcaps come in handy if you ever decide to take a nap under your desks when it’s past 8 pm…

    THE BUSY BEE AWARD

    Winner: Chris Davis

    Runner-up: Eric Buckby

    I think we can all agree that Chris is our office rocket, almost sprinting from one task to the next. Thanks for all your hard work, Chris.

    THE ALWAYS HUNGRY AWARD

    Winner: Darren Fawebert

    Runner-up: Simon Harrison

    Darren had the majority vote for this one, with several mentions of the ice lollies he consumed during the summer, Darren, well done, but please leave some ice lollies for the rest of us next year!

    BEYOND THE CALL OF DUTY AWARD

    Winner: Steve Morton

    Runner-up: John Price

    Steve has been with us for over 23 years and was crucial during the start of the Covid-19 pandemic, he never stopped, worked additional hours and held his team together, we couldn’t have operated without him – Thanks, Steve!

    THE EARLY BIRD AWARD

    Winner: Martyn Osborne

    Runner-up:  Jason Dacre

    Martyn is one of the first on site at Johnsons setting up vehicles for the days work ahead when most of us are still in bed, he always goes about his day with a smile on his face whatever the weather and time, thank you, Martyn.

    THE TEAM PLAYER AWARD

    Winner: Steve Morton

    Runner-up:  Luke Richardson

    Steve not only keeps his own department together but is the glue between many others, liaising with staff daily and keeping the business ticking.

    THE NEATEST NOOK AWARD

    Winner: Chris Davis

    Runner-up:  Gary Sutton

    As the gloves say… our ‘Queen of Clean’, if only you could see her show home standard house, fit for a visit from the Queen.

    THE DUCT TAPE AWARD

    Winner: John Price

    Runner-up:  Charlie Gibson

    If John can’t fix it…no, one can! A big thanks for keeping all five nursery sites maintained – no task is ever too big!

    THE JOKER AWARD

    Winner: Wayne Atkinson

    Runner-up:  Paul Lamb

    He was nominated for his elaborate pranks and jokes, including sticking John’s face to a bollard on the A59! There isn’t a day that goes by without a joke.

    THE CAFFEINE ADDICT AWARD

    Winner: Ian Nelson

    Runner-up:  Elliot Green

    Has anyone ever seen Ian without a coffee and fag in hand?

    THE ALWAYS WITH A SMILE AWARD

    Winner: Katie Burlingham

    Runner-up:  Isaac Onions

    Katie can be seen throughout all seasons, time of day and weather conditions with a smile on her face – keep smiling Katie 🙂

    Posted 16th Dec 1:40pm
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  84. Well done Tom and Matt

    Well done Tom and Matt

    Congratulations to Tom Knowles and Matt Campey on passing their 7.5-tonne driving test. We look forward to seeing you on the road soon!

    Posted 15th Dec 5:10pm
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  85. Our Employee of the Year - Terry Cooper

    Our Employee of the Year - Terry Cooper

    Earlier this year, we asked staff to vote for their colleagues for our ‘Employee Awards’. The winners and runners-up were announced at the Christmas party at the end of last month with 13 award categories, including ‘The Neatest Nook’, ‘The Always Hungry’ and ‘The Biggest Smile Award’.

    Our System Support Assistant, Terry Cooper, scooped up the Employee of The Year Award’ with the majority vote. 

    Terry is always on hand to help with IT issues that arise and supports our IT Manager, Darren Earle. He helps with regular upgrades, producing reports, has been fundamental in automating many of our processes and is someone who quietly listens to the problems being presented, working up a solution where he can.

    IT Manager, Darren Earle said: “Since joining the IT Team Terry has expanded his skill set significantly. He has been the lead in a number of projects such as the automation of Sales Quotes, the Despatch Diary revamp and the Production Planning. This is alongside a myriad of smaller features and functions providing automation and time saving within various departmental processes. I could not be happier with the contribution that Terry provides both in terms of projects but also in the day to day support of users.”

    Terry Cooper added ” Having now officially peaked with this prestigious award, I look forward milking every last iota of recognition and prosperity from fame’s fickle zenith. From here there is only the slow inevitable descent into avarice, tabloid scandal, arrest, rehab and finally an underwhelming 2036 sequel starring Ryan Reynolds. Thanks, Everyone ????”

    Terry was rewarded with a voucher and certificate to thank him for all of his hard work and efforts this year – well done Terry.

    Posted 10th Dec 2:50pm
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  86. Ten years on, Kata Dacre

    Ten years on, Kata Dacre

    A big thanks to Kata Dacre, a fundamental member of our retail department who has achieved ten years of service with us. Kata has not been afraid to get stuck in since she joined us and has been involved in various roles before becoming the Retail Deputy Manager. Find out what she had to say about her time at Johnsons below:

    1. How did you come to work for Johnsons?

    Johnsons had a connection with the University I studied at in Budapest. In 2009 I had the chance to come and work for the company and completed 4-months of work experience to get my degree. In 2010, a week after I graduated from Uni, I moved to England and worked for JOW.

    2. Did you work anywhere before Johnsons?

    No, Johnsons is the first company I’ve worked for.

    3. What roles have you worked in previously at Johnsons, and what do you do now?

    The first time I worked on the Container unit, I lifted plants for Amenity, and after that, I drifted to the Retail shed and have worked there ever since, you name it, I’ve done it.

    In the past 2 years, I have been the Retail Deputy Manager. I’m responsible for: checking off the trolleys before they get loaded onto the wagons, monitoring and topping up colour label stock. During the winter season, I check off and help sort the incoming bare root products.

    4. Do you feel like much has changed in the past ten years?

    It has got much busier. I have more responsibility which I like a lot. I have made good friends in the past few years. It was very hard at the beginning regarding the language barrier, the new setting, first-ever job. Still, I’ve received so much support, good and not so good critics, educational opportunities that have made me grow into the person I am today.

    5. Your most memorable day at Johnsons? 

    During my work experience here, I met Jason, and the rest is history. We had our 10th wedding anniversary last month.

    6. If you could have chosen another career, what do you think it would have been?

    If I hadn’t moved to England, I would have spent more time in education. I would like to have become a Garden Designer.

    7. Favourite part of your job?

    Because I do so many different things, I never get bored. There are always challenges which I like.

    8. What do you hope to achieve in the next ten years?

    I’m open to anything. I’m not afraid to learn new things or do something different or maybe look after and run a unit one day.

     

    Posted 8th Dec 8:39am
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  87. Ten years service for Martyn Osborne

    Ten years service for Martyn Osborne

    A big thanks to Martyn Osborne for his hard work and commitment to the company over the past ten years. He works extremely hard and is also known as Johnsons ‘early bird’, setting up vehicles for the days work ahead when most of us are still in bed. He is a crucial member of the JOW team and can be seen flying from one task to the next. Find out what he said about his time at Johnsons below.

    1)Tell us about the last ten years at Johnsons; what roles have you previously been involved in, and what do you do now?

    The last ten years have flown by. For the first five years, I worked in retail for Steve Morton, the last five years Dave Barrett and the last ten winters Tony Green in Incoming Goods and Dispatch if needed.

    2) What did you do before working at Johnsons?

    I was a delivery driver for Oddbins.

    3) What have you learnt during your time at Johnsons that you didn’t know before?

    I have learnt so much about plants and trees, which has been very rewarding. As a delivery driver, you are isolated, so working with people and plants has been new to me.

    4) What has motivated you to come to work each day?

    I enjoy my job and want to do it to the best of my ability.

    5)Proudest career moment?

    Earlier this year, Covid wiped out the retail department and I had to step up while key managers were off ill, it was great that we still fulfilled the diary and order book and i enjoyed the challenge.

    6) As a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up?

    A formula one driver

    7) Favourite plant variety?

    Salvia, there’s so many different varieties, shapes and colours. They come back stronger year after year. They are closely followed by Peonies. Both of which I have an array of in my garden at home.

    8) Favourite memory from your time at Johnsons? 

    While delivering plants to Inverness, I got to see the Northern Lights.

    As a thank you for his service, Martin has been rewarded with a certificate and £100 in vouchers.

    Posted 6th Dec 11:25am
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  88. December Gardening Reminders 2021

    December Gardening Reminders 2021

    As we approach the end of 2021, theirs plenty to keep you busy within the garden this month, from moving plants that have outgrown their space to planting roses and, of course, winter digging. Check out our December hints and tips below put together by our Chairman and Horticulturist, John Richardson.

     

    1)   After long periods of November rain, often heavy, fallen leaves have become a congealed mass on lawns and many garden corners,  try and clear them away to the compost heap before they start to rot and affect so many plants such as herbaceous, alpines, low growing shrubs and plants in containers.

     

    2)  Any plants which are now too big for their location or ‘in the wrong place’ can be safely moved, and the soil in December is usually warm enough to stimulate the production of new roots. Stake tall new plants to prevent wind rock until well-rooted and reduce their size if appropriate.

     

    3)  Place undercover any tender plants which have been overlooked earlier in the autumn and ensure that such plants growing in the ground are wrapped in straw and hessian, polythene is not the best material as it prevents air from getting to the plant.

     

    4)  If you intend to get on with the winter digging, cover a suitable area with polythene so that the ground is not waterlogged when you wish to dig.

     

    5)  Clean moss and lichens from paths and walls.  There are several commercial brands of cleaner available, but bleach is equally as good.  A power washer will make light work of the job, which is impressive when completed!

     

    6)  Lower temperatures and frost is forecast, make sure your bird feeding stations are clean and regularly refilled.  The same applies to an accessible water supply.  Remember, cooked food as opposed to birdseed may well attract vermin.

     

    7)  with long periods of rain expected, don’t forget to put a glass or plastic sheet over your alpine plants to keep off the majority of the rain.

     

    8)  Now is a good time to plant roses, heel them in if soil conditions are not suitable for immediate planting.

     

    9)  Before planting trees and shrubs ensure roots are moist by soaking in a bucket or similar.

     

    10)   This month is a good time to prune Birch and Acers.  Trim the lawn edges for a quick lift!

     

    11)   Check apples and other stored fruits for signs of rotting and throw out damaged fruit for the birds. Remove mummified fruits from the apple trees.

     

    12)  Start Amaryllis (Hippeastrum) bulbs into growth urgently if required to flower by Christmas.

     

    13)  Tidy up the greenhouse during inclement weather, and also prune glasshouse grown grapevines.

     

    14)  Be ready to plant tulip bulbs after the middle of the month to reduce tulip disease (Tulip Fire).

     

    15)  Insulate with bubble-wrap and hessian those plant containers which are to be left outside over winter, in order to prevent the pots cracking in frosty periods.

     

    16)  Thoroughly clean and grease the lawnmower and sharpen or replace the blades.

     

    17)  The earlier any winter digging can be done, the better, as this allows rain, snow, frost and ice to break down clods of soil and make cultivation in the spring so much easier.

    Posted 30th Nov 9:37am
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  89. The Growers Choice: Hedging varieties for full sun

    The Growers Choice: Hedging varieties for full sun

    Is your next garden project a bit of a suntrap? do you require hedging varieties for a full sun position? we have you covered with our favourite hedging varieties for full sun below from Photinia to Prunus and even Lavender for your smaller hedging requirements.

     

    Cornus Elegantissima 

    Grey-green leaves with creamy-white flowers in early summer and red stems that can be seen during the winter periods, plant in a sunny position for best results.

    ???? Flowers: May – June

    ???? Position: Full sun to partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 2 metres

    ???? Soil: well-drained soil

    Available in 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L + pot sizes and as bareroot from November – March

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    Grisellina littoralis 

    A great hedging plant for a seaside retreat with large glossy, apple green ovate leaves. Grow in moist well-drained soil in a sheltered sunny spot for best results.

    ???? Position: Full sun

    ???? Height: Up to 12 metres

    ???? Soil: well-drained soil

    Available in 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L + pot sizes and as a rootball and bare-root plants from November – March

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    Lavender Hidcote – why not choose a lavender plant for a scented small hedge in a sunny position? perfect for the edge of a path or small hedge at the front of a garden. This plant will also attract pollinators to your garden. Head to our pollinator-friendly plants guide for more bee loving plant varieties.

    ????Flowers: July – September

    ???? Position: Full sun

    ???? Height: Up to 0.6 metres

    ???? Soil: well-drained, fertile soil

    ———————————————————————————————

    Photinia ‘Red Robin’- A versatile evergreen shrub that can be used for hedging, trained against a wall and even used as a ½ std tree once trained. It is happy in most fertile soils, in either a sunny or shaded position. If you wish to encourage its strong red growth and more flowers, it will be better planted in a full sun position. White flowers appear by April and into May once the plant is better established. We have found Photinia ‘Red ‘Robin’ to become ‘leggy’ over time if it is not properly maintained and left to run away with themselves, they can grow up to 4m tall and up to 4 m wide.

    ????Flowers: April – May

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 4 metres

    ???? Soil: well-drained, fertile soil

    Available in 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L + pot sizes and as a rootball from November – March

    ———————————————————————————————

    Pyracantha varieties

    Known for their colourful berries available in yellow, reds and oranges which will last from Autumn through to Spring if left untouched by birds. Great against a back wall these Pyracantha will stop intruders. Available potted throughout the year.

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 3 metres

    ???? Soil: well-drained, fertile soil

    Available in 2LD, 3LD, 5L, 10L and 20L + pot sizes 

    ———————————————————————————————

    Prunus Rotundifolia 

    A vigorous, dense evergreen shrub suitable for almost all locations. Large, glossy green leaves make this a go-to plant above other Prunus varieties.  Its density makes it ideal for screening for privacy, and it is a great barrier to noise and wind. Commonly known as laurel, this hedging variety grows up to 60cm per year and is relatively happy in most soil conditions.

    ????Flowers: April

    ???? Position: Full sun – full shade

    ???? Height: Up to 5 metres

    ???? Soil: well-drained, moist soil, do not plant in shallow chalk

    Available in 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L + pot sizes and as a rootball and bare root plants from November – March

    ———————————————————————————————

    Prunus Lusitanica

    Also known as Portuguese laurel, boast luscious dark green glossy leaves on deep maroon stems with small, fragrant white flowers in the summer which are loved by pollinators and red berries in the autumn which are very popular with birds.

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 15 metres

    ???? Soil: well-drained, moist soil, do not plant in shallow chalk

    Available in 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L + pot sizes and as a rootball from November – March

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    Rosa rugosa

    A hardy, easy to grow rose with pink scented flowers from June through to September, followed by bright scarlet hips. A dense, vigorous growing hedging variety happy in full sun.

    ????Flowers: June – September

    ???? Position: Full sun – full shade

    ???? Height: Up to 1.5 metres

    ???? Soil: well-drained soil

    Available in 2L, 3L  + pot sizes and as bare-root plants from November – March

    ———————————————————————————————

    Click here for more hedging solutions

     

    Posted 30th Nov 2:29pm
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  90. The Growers Choice - Plants with winter interest

    The Growers Choice - Plants with winter interest

    There’s plenty of interest to be had from plants during the winter months whether that be the scent of Sarcococca or the flowers of Helleborus plants, check out some of our favourites below

    Cornus varieties such as ‘Midwinter Fire’, and ‘Sibrica’ 

    Cornus are known for their coloured stems that are revealed when their leaves fall. Shades of red, yellow and orange stems are available.

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Flowers: May – June

    ???? Height: Up to 3m (depending on the variety)

    ???? Width: Up to 2m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: moderately fertile soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L ( subject to availability and the variety)

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    Sarcococca varieties such as ‘Confusa’ and hookeriana ‘Winter Gem’

    Highly scented white flowers sit above large glossy, rich green leaves come late winter – early spring. It is a great addition to a shady border or a shaded patio spot where you can smell it every day.

    ???? Flowers: Late winter-early spring

    ????Position: Partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 0.5m

    Soil:fertile, well-drained, moist soil

    ———————————————————————————————

    Hellebore varieties

    Hellebores are compact, clump-forming perennials with dark green, leathery leaves and stunning flowers.

    A tremendous shade-loving border plant that will brighten up your garden when little else is flowering from December – March.

    ???? Flowers: December – March (depending on the variety)

    ????Position: Partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 45cn (depending on the variety)

    Soil: Heavy, neutral to alkaline soil

    It would help if you planted in partial to full shade for best results and cut back old leaves in January – February to show off new flowers.

    ———————————————————————————————

    Mahonia varieties such as ‘Charity’ and ‘Winter Sun’

    Are the perfect addition to a shaded spot in your garden as they prefer full – partial shade with spikes of yellow flowers from November through to March that has a fragrant reminiscent of lily-of-the-valley on dark green holly-like leaves. Prune in spring after flowering.

    ????Flowers:  November – March (depending on variety)

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist-well-drained, fertile, humus-rich soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L, 20L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Skimmia varieties such as ‘Rubella’ and ‘Kew Green’

    Are you in need of some autumn/winter colour? Skimmia Rubella are known for their dark red flower buds that are produced in autumn and last through to winter until the flowers open in spring — an excellent plant for a patio pot or border.

    ????Flowers:  April – May (depending on variety) flower buds are seen in autumn-winter.

    ???? Position: Partial – full shade

    ???? Height: Up to 1.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist-well-drained, acid soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Viburnum varieties 

    Evergreen Viburnums such as tinus are a great shrub for winter interest with dark green leaves and clusters of tiny white flowers from December to April.

    A great low maintenance easy to grow shrub that can brighten a part shaded area of the garden when little else is flowering.

    ????Flowers:  December – April

    ???? Position: Full sun or partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 3m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist-well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Hamamelis varieties 

    Hamamelis plants are covered in branches of distinctive, spider-like, fragrant flowers in red, yellow, and orange shades from January to early spring.

    Whilst slow growing this plant variety can become a large spreading shrub or small tree. A fantastic specimen plant that will make a great addition to the middle or back of a border.

    Plant in well-drained, neutral acid soil in full sun to partial shade for best results.

    ????Flowers: January – February

    ☀️ Position: Full sun – Partial shade

     Pot size: 5L, 10L, 20L + (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Jasminum nudiflorum

    A deciduous climber with bright yellow flowers that appear on bare stems in winter and early spring helping to brighten up a dark winter’s day. This attractive climber will grow well against a trellis or low wall once trained as it is not self-clinging.

    ????Flowers: January – March

    ☀️ Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 3m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist-well-drained soil

     Pot size:  2LD, 3LD  ( subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Posted 24th Nov 5:21pm
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  91. Plant Centre celebrates best year ever

    Plant Centre celebrates best year ever

    Our onsite plant centre is celebrating its best year ever, with a turnover of over 2 million, for the first time in its history. Johnsons of Whixleys overall turnover was just over 15 million, another record for the company in its 100th-year history.

    The plant centre division, which Alice Knowles runs, was responsible for selling over 340,000 items and has seen a 12.62% increase of new customers and an increase in sales of 21.07% on the previous financial year.

    The division’s successes are due to an increase in demand for garden projects and restorations by the public who have been putting their usual holiday funds into their gardens, which has made Landscapers, Garden Designers, Property Developers and others within the industry much busier. People also recognise the importance of a greener world and how plants can help the environment. We have also improved our website and social media pages and sent out regular PR campaigns, which have increased our visibility within the industry and increased the number of new customers on our system.

    Plant Centre Manager Alice Knowles said: ” We are incredibly proud to have achieved our best year ever. We have adapted to the challenges Brexit has brought and have taken on board customer feedback and requirements, including moving away from traditional lines. We have increased our range and have added more unusual and exciting lines. I’m continually looking at ways to evolve the plant centre, including keeping up with the demand and the different requirements.

    There has also been a few changes to our department with new faces joining our sales and operations side; find out more about the whole team below.”

    MEET THE TEAM

    Find out about our Amenity Sector and its changes by clicking here

     

    Posted 18th Nov 9:13am
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  92. The Growers Choice - Hedging for an exposed site

    The Growers Choice - Hedging for an exposed site

    Is your next project without any natural defence and exposed to the elements such as strong winds? we have put together a list of hedging varieties that are suitable for an exposed site below

    Acer campestre 

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 4M

    ???? Soil: any soil (except water-logged sites)

    A deciduous resilient species that filters the wind more than evergreen varieties, creating a more sheltered spot it is a great hedging variety for an exposed site.

    Available in bare-root sizes 60-80cm and seedling 30-40cm. Also available in 2L, 3L, 5L & 10L.

    Crataegus monogyna

    A popular native hedging plant is known for its large thorns, which can be seen after its green leaves fall in Autumn. It is also known for its white scented flowers, which can be seen in Spring.

    A hardy species suited to the cold and windy conditions of an inland exposed site, even in windy areas it will grow up to 3m tall.

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 3M in an exposed location

    ???? Soil: any soil (except water-logged sites)

    Available in bare-root sizes from 40-60cm up to 200cm tall and in container pots after the bare root season.

    Cupressus Leylandii

    Is one of the fastest evergreen hedging varieties that can grow up to 3ft per year with its eventual height reaching up to 12m. Great as a windbreak, general barrier and for noise reduction. A hardy plant that is well suited to a cold exposed site. Perform regular maintenance to help form a dense hedge.

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 12 metres

    ???? Soil: well-drained soil

    Available in 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L + pot sizes

    Cotoneaster Franchetii 

    Is a hardy variety suited to an exposed inland sites and coastal sites with sage green leaves with a white underside and pink flowers in early summer with deep orange berries in autumn.

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 3 metres

    ???? Soil: Any except water-logged

    Available in 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L + pot sizes

    Taxus Baccata 

    A dark green evergreen hedging variety with needle-like leaves, ideal for an exposed site as it filters down the wind.  This variety is commonly known as ‘Yew’. It is a popular variety often used in stately homes grounds and private gardens. This hedging variety is easy to trim and can be used to create shapes for a statement feature or simply cut to create a clean line.

    Red berries are seen come Autumn, which are loved by birds but harmful to humans, pets and livestock if eaten. This slow-growing variety prefers fertile, well-drained soil.

    Available in 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L + pot sizes and as a rootball from November – March

    ????Flowers: April

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 20 metres

    ???? Soil: well-drained, fertile soil

    Grisellina littoralis

    A great hedging plant for a seaside retreat with large glossy, apple green ovate leaves. Grow in moist well-drained soil in a sheltered sunny spot for best results.

    ???? Position: Full sun

    ???? Height: Up to 12 metres

    ???? Soil: well-drained soil

    Available in 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L + pot sizes

     

    Posted 22nd Nov 4:38pm
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  93. November Gardening Reminders 2021

    November Gardening Reminders 2021

    November reminds us that winter is on its way with leaves on the trees falling rapidly and the increase of rain and wind. During November container plants and some ground plants will need protection from the frosts, wind and freezing rain. November is also the start of the Bare Root and Root Ball season so there’s plenty to be on with this month. Check out our latest hints and tips put together by horticulturist John Richardson.

     

    1) The earlier winter digging can be done, the better, as this allows rain, snow, and frost to break down the clods of soil which will make cultivations in the spring so much easier.

    2)Collect and dispose of the fallen fruits from apple trees, many will be damaged and prone to spreading diseases such as brown rot.

    3)Divide and replant rhizomatous Iris, and layer Carnations and Pinks. Peg them into moist soil after carefully cracking a small section of the stem. Ensure the treated area remains in moist soil.

    4)Now is the best time to plant roses, buying plants that are field-grown (bare-root) is the most economic and will survive just as well as container-grown plants if kept moist when out of the ground. For long delays, heel in the roots of the plant in an area that is not waterlogged.

    5)Replace those small patches of the lawn which have become damaged, with turf from a less obvious area. Do not perform this task when the soil is waterlogged or frozen.

    6)Take the opportunity to cut back overgrown hedges, either mechanically on deciduous plants or with secateurs and a saw on large-leafed evergreens such as laurels and rhododendrons. Trim conifer hedges next spring.

    7)Clean moss and lichens from footpaths and walls. There are several commercial brands of cleaner available, but bleach is equally good. A power washer will make light work of the job!

    8)Before the month-end check apples and other stored fruits for signs of rotting and throw out damaged fruit for the birds.

    9)Plant tulip bulbs after the middle of the month to prevent the spread of Tulip Fire disease.

    10)Make sure you have checked the compost heap and the bonfire for hibernating animals before you light the bonfire on November 5th.!!

    11)Collect seeds of any plants you may wish to reproduce for next year. Cover seed-heads with a paper bag and tap them to release seed over time. Do not save seed from plants described as being of F1 (hybrid) origin.

    12)Cut back to ground level the canes of summer fruits such as Raspberries, Loganberries, Blackberries etc. as soon as fruiting is complete. Tie in the growth of this year’s new canes as these are your next year’s fruiting canes.

    13)From the middle of the month begin successional sowing of spring cabbage for winter harvest, and lettuce is sown under glass for use during the winter.

    14)Clean out bird boxes and sterilize them with boiling water.

    15)Insulate with bubble-wrap polythene, the pots of plants which may not be entirely hardy, or the container is a traditional frost susceptible clay pot.

    16)Don’t get carried away with autumn pruning! Plants such as Viburnum bodnantense, Lonicera fragrantissima, and the flowering cherry Prunus subhirtella ‘Autumnalis’, as these will carry sweetly scented pink flowers all the way through the winter.

    17)Lift and store dahlias if not already completed.

    Posted 2nd Nov 9:26am
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  94. Record year and new sales structure

    Record year and new sales structure

    We are celebrating a record year of sales, achieving a turnover of over £15 million for the first time in our 100th year history.

    In addition to the record turnover, the commercial sales department is celebrating a successful ten years in which revenue has grown by 50 per cent to more than £10 million.

    The team has recently appointed third-generation family member Luke Richardson as Sales Director, he said: “Commercial sales have exceeded all expectations, driven by strong performance in our core business and new custom. Reorganising our structure gives us a great foundation to improve our service offering, further incorporate new technology and drive sustainable growth. Despite the pandemic & Brexit, our upcoming annual budget is ambitious and reflects high confidence in the team.”

    The re-structure sees Iain Richardson focus on the general direction of the business, and he will retain a number of key accounts. Tony Coles heads up our all-important Key Accounts sector and is supported by Andrew Barker, who takes on the position of Key Accounts Manager.

    Vicky Newell returns to the business and assumes the responsibility of General Amenity Sales Manager with Jack Witham taking on home area sales, Hannah Smith the North and Laura Holmes the South. Corrina Mills is the companies Estimator and Ellie Richardson continues to work alongside the sales team as Marketing Manager.

    The sales team sell 6 million plants annually throughout the UK and are responsible for providing more than 10,000 quotes per year, up to 17,000 orders and 12,000 deliveries each year.

    Group MD Graham Richardson said: “Our success is primarily down to the hard work and dedication of all our staff, from the quote process right through to the lifting of orders and dispatch.

    Demand remains high as a consequence of a greater appetite for a greener world, considerable exposure from our improved website, expanded PR campaigns and significant social growth with an increase of 377% since 2017.

    These elements have played a key factor in the 30% increase of new customers. This is an exciting time for the business as Luke brings experience, motivation, compassion and an unrivalled knowledge of the market and our family business.”

    Get to know the team 

     

     

     

     

    Posted 29th Oct 1:57pm
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  95. Celebrating 30 years of quality accreditation

    Celebrating 30 years of quality accreditation

    We are celebrating achieving the BSI ISO 9001 Quality re-accreditation for the 30th year in a row.

    We have achieved the ISO 9001 Quality Management,  since 1991. We have also re-achieved ISO 14001 Environment Management standards since April 2010.

    Supplying 5-6 million plants throughout the UK each year, our plants embellish their surroundings and make a positive contribution to the environment.

    The ISO 9001 Quality Management is a clearly defined set of business processes, which defines Johnsons’ commitment to creating products and services following pre-defined standards. ISO 9001 is internationally recognised and one of the most popular international quality management systems.

    ISO 14001 is the international standard that specifies requirements for an effective environmental management system for businesses. It provides a framework that a business can follow of standards on environmental management. Integrating it with other management systems standards, like ISO 9001, can further assist in accomplishing organisational goals.

    We have also invested in 3 new electric 4 x 4 Hisun buggies this month, the robust vehicles will be trialled on the nurseries five sites with a view to replace all dumper trucks by 2025. One charge can last an impressive full working day and will be used to tow trailers and bespoke equipment.

    Graham Richardson, Managing Director at Johnsons of Whixley, said: “We are proud and delighted to have achieved the BSI ISO Quality accreditation for the 30th year in a row. It demonstrates our dedication to adhering to an external system of quality management and environmental standards to ensure the best quality products and services to current, new and potential customers. The new electric buggies are also a great addition and will reduce costs and further enhance our environmental credentials significantly in years to come.”

    Posted 6th Oct 2:42pm
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  96. Welcome back Vicky Newell

    Welcome back Vicky Newell

    Welcome back to a familiar face, Vicky Newell who re-joins our team as General Amenity Sales Manager. See what she says about her new role, and what it’s like to be back below

    1. How does it feel to be back?

    It is great to be back and to see so many familiar faces.

    2. Has much changed at Johnsons?

    Technology has changed considerable, being paperless takes some getting used to. The new quotation tool is amazing and enables many more amenity quotations to be done consistently whether they come in spreadsheet or PDF format.

    3. What will your new role involve?

    My time will be split 3 ways – managing the Amenity sales department, looking after my own Amenity accounts and generating more Amenity business (happy to listen if anyone has any great ideas on the last one !)

    4. What are you looking forward to most about your new role?

    I would like to make a difference and the more the team talks to our customers (new and old), we can improve our offer which will hopefully will generate new opportunities

    5. What do you think the challenges will be?

    Being able to fulfil customer expectations within the ever-decreasing timescales

    6. Tell us something we don’t know about you 

    I help out Knaresborough in Bloom, so can be seen planting, deadheading and watering the tubs and container in Knaresborough from time to time

    7. What do you like to get up to outside of work?

    I have 5 allotments with a friend, so that takes up most of my time on a Sunday, fighting against the weeds!

    8. Favourite food?
    I love Italian food but I am also partial to the odd slice or two of cake!

    Posted 5th Oct 1:11pm
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  97. The Growers Plantspo - May Shrubs

    The Growers Plantspo - May Shrubs

    Ceanothus varieties

    ????Flowers: May – June (depending on variety, varieties such as ‘Puget Blue’ start flowering in April, and others flower for longer than June)

    ???? Position: Full sun

    ???? Height: Up to 3m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L, 20L + (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Convolvulus cneorum 

    ????Flowers: May – July

    ???? Position: Full sun

    ???? Height: Up to 0.6m

     Soil: Poor to moderately fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L (subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Chaenomeles varieties such as ‘Jet Trail, ‘Crimson & Gold’ & ‘Nivalis’

    ????Flowers: March – May

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 2.5m

     Soil: Moderately fertile, moist but well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 3LD, 5L (subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Choisya varieties such as ‘Aztec Pearl’, ‘Sundance’ & ‘White Dazzler’

    ????Flowers: May (often have a second flush in summer)

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 2.5m

     Soil: Moderately fertile,well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L (subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Cornus varieties such as ‘ Sibirica’, ‘Aurea’ & ‘Flaviramea’

    ????Flowers: May – June

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 2.5m

     Soil: Any moderately fertile soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L (subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Deutzia varieties like ‘Mont Rose’ and ‘Rosea’

    ????Flowers: April – June

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 1m

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Euonymus varieties such as ‘Emerald & Gold’, ‘Emerald Gaiety & ‘Silver Queen’

    ????Flowers: May- June

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 1m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L , 5L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Exochorda x macrantha varieties such as ‘The Bride’ & ‘Niagara’

    ????Flowers: April – May

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 2m

    Soil: Moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 5L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Kerria japonica ‘Pleniflora’

    ????Flowers: March-May

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 2m

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Magnolia x soulangeana and the variety ‘Susan’

    ????Flowers: March-May

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 6m

    Soil: Moist, well-drained, acidic soil

     Pot size: 3L, 5L 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Osmanthus x burkwoodii & delavayi

    ????Flowers: April-May

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 3m

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Potentilla varieties such as ‘Red Robin’ ‘Lovely pink’ ‘Goldfinger’ ‘Abbotswood’ and ‘Tangerine’ 

    ????Flowers: May – October

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 1m depending on the variety

    Soil: moderately fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 7.5L, 10L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Pyracantha ‘Saphyr’ varieties in ‘Red’, Yellow’ & ‘Orange’

    ????Flowers: May

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 3m depending on the variety

    Soil: any fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 3LD, 5L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Pieris varieties such as ‘Flaming Silver’ ‘Forest Flame’ and ‘Little Heath’

    ????Flowers:  April – May

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 3m depending on the variety

    Soil: any fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Rhododendron in variety 

    ????Flowers:  May – June

    ???? Position: Full sun –  Partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 2.5m depending on the variety

    Soil:Moist, well-drained, humus-rich, acid soil or ericaceous compost

     Pot size: 3L, 5L, 7.5L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Ribes sanguineum varieties such as ‘King Edward’, ‘Pulborough Scarlet’

    ????Flowers:  April – May

    ???? Position: Full sun

    ???? Height: Up to 3m depending on the variety

    Soil: Moderately fertile, moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 2LD, 3L, 3LD, 5L, 10L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Rosmarinus officinalis and the variety ‘Jessops Upright’

    ????Flowers:  May-June

    ???? Position: Full sun

    ???? Height: Up to 2m depending on the variety

    Soil:  well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L,  5L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

     

    Syringa varieties 

    ????Flowers: May-June

    ???? Position: Full sun

    ???? Height: Up to 4m depending on the variety

    Soil: Fertile, moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L3L, 5L, 10L, 12L, 20L + (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Weigela varieties

    ????Flowers: May-June

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 2.5m depending on the variety

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L3L, 5L, 10L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

     

    Posted 17th May 11:21am
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  98. The Growers Choice - Acers for autumn

    The Growers Choice - Acers for autumn

    Acers (Japanese maples) are best known for their vivid autumn leaves that turn various colours during October, including fiery red, orange, yellow and brown. They make a perfect focal point brightening up dark corners of the garden, and even grow well in pots.

     

    Acer palmatum ‘Aureum’ 

    A medium-sized maple with stunning yellow leaves in spring followed by yellow lime coloured leaves in summer and shades of orange and red in autumn.

    ???? Position: Partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 4 metres

    ???? Spread: Up to 4 metres

    Acer palmatum ‘Garnet’ 

    Has fantastic bright scarlet leaves during autumn that is a garnet stone colour throughout spring and summer, it’s slightly more compact than other varieties so makes a great addition to a patio pot or planted in a smaller garden.

    ???? Position: Partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 2 metres

    ???? Spread: Up to 2 metres

    Acer ‘Ryusen’ 

    Is a great compact weeping Japanese maple variety with mid to bright green leaves in spring and summer that turn an orange-red in autumn.

    ???? Position: Partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 2 metres

    ???? Spread: Up to 2 metres

     

    Acer palmatum ‘Firecracker’ 

    Purple and red shades in spring that have an outstanding autumn colour show of brilliant hues of oranges and reds.

    ????Position: Partial shade

    ????Height: Up to 4 metres

    ????Spread: Up to 4 metres

    Acer palmatum ‘Orange Dream’

    A small-sized tree with a dark orange edge and yellow centre in autumn turning to shades of green during the summer.

    ????Position: Partial shade

    ????Height: Up to 4 metres

    ????Spread: Up to 3 metres

    Acer ‘Shaina’ 

    A compact variety perfect for smaller gardens or even a patio pot. Displays of shades of red throughout the seasons and a crimson red in autumn.

    ????Position: Partial shade

    ????Height: Up to 4 metres

    ????Spread: Up to 3 metres

    Acer ‘Sango Kaku’

    Known for its coral-pink stems and lush green leaves in summer that turn a soft yellow in autumn this will make a great feature tree.

    ????Position: Partial shade

    ????Height: Up to 4 metres

    ????Spread: Up to 2 metres

     

    In need of more inspiration for your next project? head back to our solutions page here

    Posted 25th Aug 1:31pm
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  99. Planters bring iconic Quayside to life this summer

    Planters bring iconic Quayside to life this summer

    Newcastle’s iconic Quayside on the River Tyne has recently been brought to life as part of the NE1 Summer in the City project which has transformed a number of outdoor spaces across the city.

    As part of the project sixty-nine, large planters have been installed along the Quayside. The planters have been made from upcycled concrete manhole rings, which have been decorated and filled with shrubs, herbaceous, grasses and trees, alongside various art installations to enhance the planting design.

    Our customer Southern Green Ltd was commissioned to design and install the planters by their client NE1 Ltd with the planting interventions designed and delivered within 10 weeks including the procurement of all materials. JCC Engineers, Trevor Atkinson Landscapes, AH Events, Glebe House Vintage, Merchant no.1, RASKL Studio and The Traveller and the Bear were also part of the team brought together by NE1 to deliver this ambitious project.

    Southern Green Ltd called upon Johnsons to supply a large number of plants including Carex Testacea, Achillea ‘Cloth of Gold’ Hebe ‘Sutherlandii’, Lavandula ‘Munstead’, Rudbeckia ‘Goldsturm’, Salvia ‘Caradonna’, Astilbe ‘Fanal’, Miscanthus ‘Gracillimus, Campanula ‘Perla Blue’ and Verbena bonariensis.

    Other pop-ups installed throughout Newcastle’s city centre have included a large open-air cinema Screen on the Green at Old Eldon Square,  ‘Wave-Field’, an installation of 8 seesaws,  the Urban Garden at Wesley Square, a 75m long pavement vinyl by artist Tim Gresham, 3D Street Art by 3D Joe & Max and even water activities on the river.

    The ‘Summer in the City’ project aims to encourage tourists and locals into the city, with new attractions and activities to enjoy for all age groups.

    Alex Slack, Head of Special Projects at NE1 Ltd said: “The Summer in the City project and associated Quayside interventions are the result of months of hard work, dedication and commitment of everybody involved. Emerging from lockdown and faced with both material and labour shortages (as well as a relatively short lead in) it was vital that we had the right people in place to deliver our vision. The creativity and innovative thinking of Southern Green coupled with a first-rate service from Johnsons enabled us to achieve something truly remarkable despite numerous challenges. We are absolutely thrilled with the result and are enormously grateful to all who contributed.”

    Liam Haggarty, Southern Green Director, said: “It has been a privilege to be involved in yet another fantastic and innovative project working alongside friends and colleagues at NE1. The project is an exemplar for what can be achieved with a ‘can do’ attitude and a fantastic team of people all willing to go the extra mile from start to finish.

    Johnsons are always great to work with and provide the highest quality plant stock. They agreed to a nursery visit at very short notice, and then collated and delivered everything to our exacting specification within a matter of days, which was one of the key factors to the successful delivery of the works on site – thank you again to Tony and his team.”

    It was great to get involved in this project and bring the Quayside to life this summer. Liam came to the Nursery to choose the plants required.  The aim was to get as much colour in as possible with good quality plants, each batch of plants was tagged to indicate the grade required to be lifted. All of the plants were sent to the site on trollies to avoid damage to the plants and particularly the flowers.

    This is not the first ‘pop-up’ project johnsons has been involved with, click here to see a pop-up garden we supplied in Manchester for a well-known coffee brand.

     

    Posted 23rd Aug 3:55pm
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  100. The Growers Choice: Long-flowering plants

    The Growers Choice: Long-flowering plants

    If you are wanting your garden to bloom throughout the year, be sure to include long-flowering varieties in your projects from Vincas to Erysimum. Below is a list of some of our favourite long-flowering varieties.

    Erysimum Bowle’s Mauve

    A long-flowering semi-evergreen with narrow, grey-green leaves. This perennial produces spikes of purple flowers from late February to July and will make a great addition to a long flowering sunny border.

    ???? Flowers: February – July

    ????Position: Full sun

    ???? Height: Up to 0.75m

    ???? Soil: poor to moderately fertile, well-drained soil

    Available in 2L pots.

    Vinca minor

    One of our favourite ground cover plants is the evergreen Vinca Minor. It is well-known for its capability in ground-covering flaunting its star-like blue flowers which can be seen from April to September. Planting the Vinca Minor in very dry soil exposed to full sun or partial shade will allow them to flourish.

    ???? Flowers: April – September

    ????Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 0.2 metres

    ???? Soil: Very dry soil

    Available in 2L pots.

    Persicaria ‘Darjeeling Red’

    Is a semi-evergreen perennial, well-known for its crimson upright flowers. It can be seen in the Autumn months from September to November, growing up to half a metre tall. For best results, soil moisture must be moist but well-drained.

    ???? Flowers: June-October

    ????Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 0.5 metres

    ???? Soil: Moist but well-drained

    Available in 2L and 5L pots.

    Geranium varieties

    A perfect plant doing well in partial shade to full sun, it’s great for underplanting or filling in any empty gaps in your border, adding beautiful purple flowers from June through to October.

    ???? Flowers: June – October

    ????Position: Sun – Partial Shade

    ???? Height: Up to 0.6m

    ???? Soil: fertile, well-drained soil.

    Salvia varieties such as ‘Caradonna’

    Violet blue flowers grow on purple stems from June to October. Happiest in a sunny position in a well-drained border. The flowers are well-loved by bees and butterflies.

    ????Flowers: June – October (depending on variety)

    ???? Position: Full sun

    ???? Height: Up to 1.2m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moderately fertile, moist but well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L,5L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    Fuchsia varieties such as ‘Tom Thumb’ ‘Genii’ and ‘Mrs Popple’

    A great addition to a sunny partial shade area of a project. They would even look great in a hanging basket.

    ????Flowers: June-October

    ???? Position: Full sun  or partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    Potentilla varieties such as ‘Red Robin’ ‘Lovely pink’ ‘Goldfinger’ ‘Abbotswood’ and ‘Tangerine’

    ????Flowers: May – October

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 1m depending on the variety

    Soil: moderately fertile, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 7.5L, 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    Agastache varieties such as ‘Morello’, ‘Little Adder’ & ‘Blue Fortune’

    ????Flowers:  July – October (depending on variety)

    ???? Position: Full sun

    ???? Height: Up to 1m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L. 3L

    Verbena bonariensis

    Tall branching stems with clusters of lilac-purple flowers from June to September are ideal for the front or middle of a border in full sun.

    ???? Flowers: June – September (depending on variety)

    ????Position: Full sun

    ???? Height: Up to 2m  (depending on variety)

    ???? Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

    Available in 2l  pots (depending on variety) 

    Other long-flowering varieties you could use include Lavender, Hypericum, Erigeron, Penstemon, Nepeta and Buddleia.

    For more garden inspiration, head to our solutions page by clicking here

    Posted 11th Aug 10:33am
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  101. The Growers Choice: Hedging for birds

    The Growers Choice: Hedging for birds

    Encourage birds into your garden projects by planting bird-friendly species such as Ilex aquifolium and Crataegus monogyna. See our bird-friendly hedging favourites below.

    1) Ilex aquifolium (Holly) is definitely a bird’s favourite. Its dense prickly leaves offer windproof shelter along with berries for a Christmas feast. Blackbirds and thrushes are usually the first to strip a holly bush of its berries.

    Available as root balls in the winter and container plants in a multitude of sizes throughout the year.

    ????Flowers: June- July

    Fruits: October – January

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 20 metres

    ???? Soil: well-drained, moist, moderately fertile, humus-rich soil

    2) Crataegus monogyna (Hawthorn) berries are a favourite for Chaffinches, Starlings, Blackbirds and Greenfinches. The leaves are the food plant for caterpillars of many moth species, providing food for baby birds in spring.

    ????Flowers: May – June

    Fruits: September – November

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 6 metres

    ???? Soil: Any soil (apart from water-logged)

    We have a great selection of bare root hedging available from 40-60cm tall to 175-200cm tall from November to March.

    3) Prunus spinosa (Blackthorn) is used by birds to nest among its dense thorny branches and feast on caterpillars and other insects on its leaves, and feast on the sloe berries in autumn.

    ????Flowers: March

    Fruits: September – November

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 4 metres

    ???? Soil: Any soil (apart from water-logged)

    Available in container pots throughout the year or in bare-root form come November – March. 

    4) Prunus padus (bird cherry) Provides a spring feast for pollinators. Its cherries are eaten by birds such as blackbirds and song thrushes and other mammals such as a dormouse.

    ????Flowers: March

    Fruits: August

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 5 metres

    ???? Soil: Will tolerate most soil types

    You can purchase this variety from us throughout the year as a container-grown plant or as a bare root one from November – March. 

    5) Cotoneaster varieties 

    Cotoneaster branches are always full of small red berries from autumn onwards and provide great shelter for a nesting site. They are popular with thrushes, Blackbirds and Waxwings.

    ????Flowers: May

    Fruits: Autumn

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 6 metres

    ???? Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

    Available in a number of pot sizes from 2L to 10L.

    6) Alnus glutinosa (Alder) seeds are eaten by birds such as Siskin, redpoll and goldfinches, as well as its catkins providing an early source of nectar and pollen for bees.

    ????Flowers: February – April

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 10 metres

    ???? Soil: Will tolerate most soil types

    This hedging plant is available in container pots throughout the year and in various bare-root sizes from November-March. 

    Other hedging varieties to consider to help encourage birds into your garden include Pyracantha, Acer campestre, Dog Rose and Malus sylvestris.

    Posted 10th Aug 3:22pm
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  102. Memorial bench pays tribute to past employee

    Memorial bench pays tribute to past employee

    Two employees Krzysztof Scislowski and Tom Watkins, have recently created a memorial bench for a previous employee, Dean Yarrow using pallets.

    Earlier this year, we were notified of a fatal car accident on the A165 near Bridlington, which involved Dean, his wife and toddler Henry. Dean and his wife sadly died at the scene while their son was treated for minor injuries.

    Dean was a well-loved hard-working member of the Johnsons team for 3 years from 2016-2019 and was Deputy Manager at our Whixley site, working closely with Krzysztof and Tom.

    Krzystof and Tom are some of many Johnsons employees with fond memories of Dean and specifically remember him eating his lunch sat on nursery pallets which inspired their pallet bench memorial idea.

    Deputy Cattal Manager, Tom Watkins said:

    “Dean was an unforgettable character; his knowledge and passion for plants were inspiring to me when working with him.

    His ability to always make me laugh both in and outside of work was everything you needed in a good friend.

    This bubbly persona definitely shines through in his son, Henry, who is also a likeness of his mother in that sense. The memorial bench Krzysztof made is a great place for others to share the memory of Dean.”

    Whixley site Manager Krzysztof, said: “

    Dean was a helpful, funny, loved friend not only at work but also after. He always had a smile and was ready to help

    and such will stay in my memory, a lot of the things we did together at Whixley will remind me of him.”

    Group Managing Director, Graham Richardson added: “Dean was a genuinely likeable character who was a valued colleague at Roecliffe, Whixley and in the business generally.

    There is little we can do to ‘soften’ the impact of this tragic accident – memories are all we have and our memorial bench is a fitting tribute.”

     

    Posted 9th Aug 2:33pm
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  103. A new role for Jack Witham

    A new role for Jack Witham

    Congratulations to Jack Witham, who has joined our Amenity Sales team as a Junior Sales Executive Find out what he had to say about his new role below.

    1. What will your new role at Johnsons involve?

    I am going into the Amenity sales team, so it involves several things to do with the Amenity side. Doing quotes is what I have started learning, but it also includes sorting sales orders and dealing with customers, new and old.

    2. How long have you been a part of the Johnsons team?

    I started at Johnsons when I was 17 during the summer holidays whilst I was at six form college. From then, I’d regularly come back in between term times whilst studying at university. After finishing university last year, I stayed on the nursery until taking this new role. My role was predominantly being an amenity lifter, preparing orders for customers making sure everything was to a high standard.

    3. What are you most looking forward to in your new role?

    Going into a different job role within the company is what I am most looking forward to, and working on a range of different things. This is my first job in an office, so it will be interesting to see what it is like inside.

    4. What do you think the challenges will be?

    Doing a job completely different from anything I have done before and learning all the different tips and techniques on computers. My I.T skills are O.K, but there is definitely room for improvement.

    5. Do you have any hobbies?

    I am a big cricket fan which shouldn’t come as much surprise working here. I am the Whixley cricket club captain, playing every weekend in summer when it doesn’t rain. I also have a membership at Yorkshire cricket club and watch them a lot when I can. I think that’s the only hobby I actually have.

    6. Favourite subject at school?

    Shockingly, it was P.E. Unfortunately, we hardly ever played cricket at school, and I wasn’t very good at other sports. I scored an own goal during my football examination, which brought my markdown.

    7. Favourite food?

    I love a Lamb pasanda from an Indian. It has to be the best meal out there. Any Indian food, though, is nice. Chinese is also very good. To be honest, I like a lot of food, just not mushrooms and cauliflower.

    8. Favourite holiday destination? 

    Barcelona is a wonderful city. It’s got everything, plenty of bars, a lovely beach, and lots of Estrella. I’d love to go back again if I get the chance to. Hopefully travelling between countries will be easier soon and I can go abroad again.

    Amenity Sales Manager, Tony Coles said: I would like to welcome Jack into the Amenity Sales Team, Jack brings with him the experience of working out on the Nursery lifting plants for the Amenity sector. I am confident  Jack will become an integral part of the team looking after customers and their requirements in the future and I look forward to working with him.

     

    Posted 4th Aug 8:56am
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  104. Welcome to the team Jacob Heap

    Welcome to the team Jacob Heap

    A warm welcome to Jacob Heap, who has joined our cash & carry team for work experience this August to help fund his racing car.

    1) Tell us about yourself:

    I am 15 years old and about to go into year 11. I race cars as my hobby but hope to do it professionally.

    2)What do you like to get up to outside of school?

    Meet up and go away on holiday with friends. I work on my race car. I work with my dad to help pay for racing.

    3)How did you get into racing driving?

    I tried football and hated it, so my dad bought me a go-kart, and I raced go-karts for 7 years and then decided I wanted to race cars.

    4)Favourite race experience and track?

    My favourite track is Snetterton, and my favourite race experience was there 4 weeks ago when I started in 14th and battled to get to 6th.

    5)What will your work experience money go towards?

    It will help fund my racing car.

    6) Where do you hope to be in five years time?

    Racing in cars at a higher level, winning championships and being as successful as I can.

    To find out more about Jacob and his racing, click here to visit his website

     

    Posted 9th Aug 2:05pm
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  105. August Gardening Reminders 2021

    August Gardening Reminders 2021

    The lighter evenings are slowly on their way out as we enjoy the last month of summer. However, there’s still plenty to be doing this August, including dead-heading, cutting back and dividing. Check out our August gardening hints and tips put together by Chairman and horticulturist John Richardson below.

    1) When going on holiday and concerned about indoor containers being watered, try placing a full bucket of water on the garage floor and placing your pots around it on their own saucers. Using a piece of thick wet string about the consistency of a thick bootlace, tie one end to a piece of old cutlery and place it in the bucket. Push the other end of the string into the compost in one of the pots.  Place strings from the cutlery to all the other pots and cross fingers!!  It works for me !!

    2) Complete the lifting of last seasons bulbs and dry them off naturally in light woven sacks for maximum ventilation.

    3) Keep dead-heading the really good flowering plants, and don’t allow them to dry out. This should encourage new flowers and stop them from setting seed. Where heavy watering has been applied, consider giving the plants a top-dressing of general fertilizer, either dry or liquid, to keep them growing well into the autumn.

    4) Cut back the long whippy growths of Wisteria to within 3 buds of the old wood if they are not required to extend the area covered by the plant.

    5) Keep an eye on the whole garden and spray or pick off pests on Dahlias and Chrysanthemums in particular.

    6) Collect and dispose of the first fallen fruits from apple trees. Many will be damaged and prone to spreading diseases such as brown rot.

    7) Divide and replant rhizomatous Iris, and layer Carnations and Pinks. Peg them into moist soil after carefully cracking a small section of the stem. Ensure the treated area remains in moist soil.

    8) Continue to water new lawns recently established. I suggest that it would be better to leave further lawn development until after mid-September when the weather is cooler.

    9) It is important to provide water for wildlife in the dry months, a substantial bird bath plus a large saucer of water let into the ground for mice, hedgehogs, insects etc., will be much appreciated!

    10) Collect seeds of any plants you may wish to reproduce for next year. Cover seed-heads with a paper bag and tap them to release seed over time. Do not save seed from plants described as being of F1 origin.

    11) Cut back to ground level the canes of summer fruits such as Raspberries, Loganberries, Blackberries etc., as soon as fruiting is complete. Tie in the growth of this year’s new canes as these are your next year’s fruiting canes.

    12)From the middle of the month begin successional sowing of spring cabbage for winter harvest and lettuce sown under glass for use during the winter

    13) Make sure to leave time to be able to sit back and enjoy the late August evenings before the need to start winter digging and tree pruning becomes an urgent matter!

    Posted 6th Aug 2:36pm
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  106. September Gardening Reminders 2021

    September Gardening Reminders 2021

    The mornings now have a fresh feel to them, but overnight temperatures are still staying above 10 degrees. It really does feel as though we are coming to the end of the summer now, but there’s plenty to be doing in the garden this month; below are some hints and tips put together by Chairman and horticulturist John Richardson.

    1)The first 10 days of September is the last time to be taking cuttings of tender perennials such as pelargoniums and fuchsias. Roots will form much quicker before the cooler weather sets in. It is better to take cuttings at this late stage to root them round the edge of a pot and leave them in the pot until transplanting next spring. Alternatively, bring the old plants under cover in a cool but frost-free room and take cuttings early next year.

    2)Have you ever thought of buying a greenhouse? Now is a good time to buy at a discounted price, with the whole winter to erect it and have it ship-shape for the start of next spring.

    3)Time to check bigger trees around the garden; September can be a windy month and well worth the knowledge that boughs are not likely to come crashing down on the house, the garden and the new greenhouse in the winter sales.

    4) If you have time to spare on the weekend, take a notebook around the garden and note those plants which are happy in their location, are growing too big, have the wrong colour combination with neighbouring plants, or really need more space. It will make your winter sort-out in the garden much easier.

    5) Planting new shrubs in autumn has the benefit of warm soil to get the plants established before winter and the soil is usually moist; delay bare-root tree planting until November and be sure to install a stake at the time of planting. Always put the stake on the windward side and secure it with a proper tree time.

    6) September is a good month to plant spring-flowering bulbs, but leave tulips until November, as this will help prevent the fungal disease ‘tulip fire’. If you find mice digging up your crocus bulbs, cover them with fine chicken wire, which won’t affect grass mowing but should dissuade mice.

    7)If you have heavy soil, dig over the garden borders later this month as the bedding plants need to be removed. This will make digging easier as the soil will not be at full water capacity as in later months.

    8) Crocosmias form large mounds of roots and corms over the years, separate them with 2 forks by pulling them apart, or remove the soil and untangle them with the help of a hosepipe jet.

    9) Continue to trim fast-growing hedging, and don’t overlook the weeds in the hedge bottoms.

    10)Newly planted perennials will do well when planted over the next 6 weeks. Give the roots of new plants a good soaking before planting, and firm in well to the original depth and place a good mulch around the plant to prevent moisture loss and winter frost damage to young roots.

    11) During this month and next, the lawn can be cut less frequently but will really benefit from mechanical scarifying or the regular use of a spring tine rake to remove the old ‘thatch’. Aerating the lawn by means of a machine or a garden fork will work wonders, in conjunction with a specific lawn weed-killer and an autumn lawn fertilizer dressing.

    Posted 16th Sep 3:27pm
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  107. October Gardening Reminders 2021

    October Gardening Reminders 2021

    The temperatures have dropped and trees & shrubs are changing colour  –  autumn is officially here, but there’s still plenty to be doing in the garden this month from planting bulbs to taking cuttings; below are some hints and tips put together by Chairman and horticulturist John Richardson.

    1) Give conifer hedges a final trim and finish planting evergreen shrubs while the soil is still warm, and new roots will develop quickly.

    2) Lift and store carrots and potatoes. Cut back strong stems of tall shrubs like lavatera and Buddleia to half their length to prevent winter damage. Complete the cutting back to 15 inches in February/March.

    3) Collect the seed of those plants you may wish to increase and will come true from seed. Store seed in paper bags in a sealed container on the bottom shelf of a refrigerator. If unsure when to sow the seed, sow half on the collection and the other half in the spring.

    4) At the end of October give the glasshouses and frames a thorough clean both inside and outside. Scrub down the benches with a mild disinfectant before hosing down the entire area.

    5) If you have electricity in the glasshouse, check that the earth-breaker is undamaged and clean.

    6) Fix grease bands to the trunks of apple and pear trees.

    7) Clean out ponds and water features, and remove water pumps for the winter.

    8) Repair broken fences, patios, trellises, steps, fall pipes and walls.

    9) Take hardwood cuttings of forsythia, deutzia, honeysuckle, jasmine, Virginia creeper, holly, privet, cotoneaster, poplar, willow, gooseberries, blackcurrants etc., at the end of the month.

    10) Make several collections through the month of fallen leaves, and store them in a wire-netting enclosed area to ensure they rot down over winter. Do not leave fallen leaves on the lawn.

    11) Clean out leaves from around alpine plants. If permanently outside and not in a cold frame, cover with a pinned down sheet of glass over winter to prevent the plants from becoming water-logged.

    12) Lift Dahlias, Gladioli, and other tender perennials when temperatures fall sharply and store them in a frost-free place.

    13) This is a good month to lay turf providing the ground has been firmed, raked, levelled and weeded.

    14) If the weather warms up at the end of the month, take the opportunity to prepare compost and boxes for sowing half-hardy annuals by the end of the month. You should have a heat source available for frost prevention on cold nights

    15) Be sure to have a stock of sand or salt for very frosty mornings when paths and roads are slippery.

    16) Plant new daffodils, but don’t plant tulips until mid-November to reduce the risk of Tulip Fire Disease.

    17) When planting new trees larger than 2m., place a diagonal stake into the prevailing wind to prevent the tree from leaning over in the first year.

    18) Remember, when selecting shrubs, birds don’t like yellow berries!!

    19) lift and divide rhubarb crowns at 5-year intervals, a spade is the best implement to use!

    Interested in plants that are looking good this October, click here to view

     

     

    Posted 4th Oct 1:01pm
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  108. The Growers Plantspo - August Herbaceous

    The Growers Plantspo - August Herbaceous

    Are you in need of some inspiration for your next garden project and after some late-flowering herbaceous plants? check out some of our favourite August flowering varieties from Anemone to Rudbeckia.

    Achillea varieties such as ‘Terracotta’, ‘Cloth of Gold’ and ‘Moon Dust

    Achilleas are a great addition to a mixed border or cottage garden in full sun – partial shade with flat-topped flowers that bloom from June – September with many cultivars and colours to choose from ranging from yellow to white and pink.

    ????Flowers:  June-September (depending on variety)

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade (depending on variety)

    ???? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Anemone varieties such as ‘September Charm’, ‘Honorine Jobert’ & ‘Hadspen Abundance’

    ????Flowers:  August – October (depending on variety)

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 1.2m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist, fertile, humus-rich soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ———————————————————————————————

    Alchemilla Mollis

    ????Flowers:  June-September (depending on variety)

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 0.6m

    Soil: Humus-rich soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Alstromeria varieties such as ‘White Magic’, ‘Indian Summer’ and ‘Inticancha Maya’

    ????Flowers:  June-September (depending on variety)

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 0.9m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 3L

    ——————————————————————————————–

    Agastache varieties such as ‘Morello’, ‘Little Adder’ & ‘Blue Fortune’

    ????Flowers:  July – October (depending on variety)

    ???? Position: Full sun

    ???? Height: Up to 1m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L. 3L

    ——————————————————————————————–

    Agapanthus varieties such as Africanus, ‘Twister’ and ‘Polar Ice’

    ????Flowers:  July – September (depending on the variety)

    ???? Position: Full sun

    ???? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

    ——————————————————————————————–

    Astrantia varieties such as ‘Claret’, ‘Hadspen Blood’ and ‘Rosea’

    ????Flowers: June – August (depends on the variety)

    ???? Position: Full sun -partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist, preferably humus-rich soil

     Pot size: 3L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Aster varieties such as ‘Monch’, ‘Bahamas’ & ‘Barbados’

    ????Flowers: August – October (depends on the variety)

    ???? Position: Full sun

    ???? Height: Up to 0.9m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Well-drained, moderately fertile soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Campanula varieties such as ‘Perla Blue’, ‘Perla White’ & ‘White Clips’

    ????Flowers: July – September (depends on the variety)

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 0.3m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist, well-drained, soil

     Pot size: 2L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Coreopsis varieties such as ‘Limerock Ruby’, ‘Golden Sphere’ and ‘Sunkiss’

    ????Flowers: June – September (depends on the variety)

    ???? Position: Full sun -partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 0.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 3L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Crocosmia varieties such as ‘Lucifer’ and ‘George Davidson’

    ????Flowers: August – September

    ???? Position: Full sun -partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 1.2m (depending on variety)

    Soil:Moderately fertile, humus-rich, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 3L, 5L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Dahlia varieties such as ‘Happy Days Pink’, ‘Happy Days Red’ and ‘Happy Days Yellow’

    ????Flowers: June – September (depends on the variety)

    ???? Position: Full sun -partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 0.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 3L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Echinacea varieties such as ‘White Swan’, ‘Magnus’ and ‘Alba’

    ????Flowers: July – September

    ???? Position: Full sun

    ???? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Most soils, except very dry or boggy

     Pot size: 2L, 3L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Erigeron varieties such as ‘Sea Breeze’ and Erigeron karvinskianus

    ????Flowers: May – October (depending on variety)

    ???? Position: Full sun

    ???? Height: Up to 0.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Eryngium varieties such as ‘Neptune’s Gold’

    ????Flowers: July – August

    ???? Position: Full sun

    ???? Height: Up to 0.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: dry, well-drained, poor to moderately fertile soil

     Pot size: 2L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Geranium varieties such as ‘Rozanne’ and ‘Max Frei’ 

    ????Flowers: June – October (depending on variety)

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 0.6m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Geum varieties such as ‘Totally Tangerine’, ‘Cosmopolitan’ and ‘Sunrise’

    ????Flowers: June – August (depending on variety)

    ???? Position: Full sun

    ???? Height: Up to 0.6m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 3L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Helenium varieties such as ‘Moerheim Beauty’, ‘Short and Sassy’ and ‘The Bishop’ 

    ????Flowers: July – August (depending on variety)

    ???? Position: Full sun

    ???? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Leucanthemum ‘Banana Cream’ and ‘Snow Lady’

    ????Flowers: June – September (depending on variety)

    ???? Position: Full sun – partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moderately fertile, moist but well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Liatris varieties such as ‘Alba’, ‘Floristan’ & ‘Kobold’

    ????Flowers: August – September (depending on variety)

    ???? Position: Full sun

    ???? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moderately-fertile, reliably moist soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L

    ———————————————————————————————

    Monarda varieties such as ‘Balmy Lilac’ and ‘Balmy Pink’

    ????Flowers: July – August

    ???? Position: Full sun- partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 0.4m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability).

    ———————————————————————————————

    Nepeta varieties such as ‘Six Hills Giant’, ‘Walkers Low’ and ‘Junior Walker’

    ????Flowers: June – September (depending on variety)

    ???? Position: Full sun- partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 0.9m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L, 5L (depending on variety and subject to availability).

    ———————————————————————————————

    Penstemon varieties 

    ????Flowers: July – October

    ???? Position: Full sun- partial shade

    ???? Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)